Will this vertical method by okay for my tomatoes?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by hengal, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. hengal

    hengal Well-Known Member

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    This year I am growing more tomato plants than I ever have before - 36 plants, 6 different varieties. To make the maximum use of my bed I'm picturing a long "wall" of welded wire fencing (5' high) attached at each end to a wooden post cemented in the ground. Then, I will have the bed running lengthwise in front of this fencing. Will welded wire work okay? I figure it would give me plenty of places to tie the tomatoes to. I've been trying to look up as many pictures of this as I can to get ideas. These are the materials I have on hand at home. Will this work okay?
     
  2. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    It should work fine if they are determinate tomatoes. I tie mine up with old nylon hose sections.

    hollym
     

  3. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    It depends on what type of tomatoes you have . I have some that are 4 foot tall and some that will grow up past my 6 foot tall trellis and hang down again.
     
  4. hengal

    hengal Well-Known Member

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    Okay, well these are all inderterminate, so I guess I'll have to get 8 foot posts at each end and attach the welded wire to them maybe a foot off the ground for added height. That should give them at least 6 feet to grow up. Geesh, I've never seen a 6 foot tomato plant! :eek: This should be fun!
     
  5. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    You're going to want intermediate supports for your wire or it will end up sagging.

    I do something similar using livestock panels wired to t-stakes. Easy to put up, easy to take down. When the tomatoes start climbing over the top I begin pruning them to encourage side branches.

    .....Alan.
     
  6. matt_man

    matt_man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We grew pink oxhearts last year and we have always used welded wire or cattle panels. They grew up six feet and more than halway down the other side last year. We also tie with old pantyhose or use tomatoe clips.
     
  7. hengal

    hengal Well-Known Member

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    You're going to want intermediate supports for your wire or it will end up sagging

    Yes, I was going to use metal fence (t) posts for the middle supports. You know - cattle panels are a good idea! I forgot about them. Would they maybe be a bit sturdier too?
    However, I already have the welded wire fence still new in the barn.
    Mattman - silly question - what are pink oxhearts?? :confused:
     
  8. matt_man

    matt_man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pink oxhearts are an heirloom variety of paste tomato. You can get them at bakercreekseeds.com. We live close to there and go to their spring planting festival every year. That is where I got the plants to try last year. I won't go back to growing anything else now. They worked great for all my needs. I made BBQ Sauce, Spaghetti Sauce, regular sauce, salsa, and stewed tomatoes with them. They grow really big and are really meaty. They are not as dark red in color and are (as their name suggests) heart shaped. We saved seed last year and are growing 86 plants this year instead of the 22 we had last year.

    We had to use hog wire for one portion of our trelis last year and that is pretty flimsy but worked good with extra t-post for support.
     
  9. hengal

    hengal Well-Known Member

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    Mattman -

    wow - those sound great! I'll have to look into getting some of those, as I'd like to try to make sauce and salsa. This will be my first year trying that and I understand that the meatier the tomato the better. I ordered from Bakercreek earlier this year. I like their selection. I bought from them (seeds)and have growing Roman Candle, Yellow Pear and Plum Lemon. (must have been on a yellow kick this year) I have 3 other red varieties that came from elsewhere. Lucky for you to be so close to them! :) That would be great!
     
  10. SelfSufficientO

    SelfSufficientO becky3086

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    I use welded wire for mine too. If my indeterminates grow over it that is fine. Tomato plants don't have to grow up to produce tomatoes. Good luck with yours. I am growing several different varieties myself.
     
  11. Heritage

    Heritage Well-Known Member

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    We use cattle panels for our tomatoes and when they grow to the top of the panel I just bend them over and grow them sideways. It doesn't look too neat at first, but they will easily fill out and you've got a tomato hedge. Last year I put up a 16' cattle panel and when I pulled the suckers off my grape tomatoes, just stuck them in the dirt under the panel. They grew 10 times better than the suckers I brought inside to root.
     
  12. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This should work but the maters may get a little higher. I use the welded wire for my cucumbers and 1/2" rebar for the tomatoes. A 10 foot section 3 feet in the ground gives 7 feet for the tomatoes to grow. My rebar is 27 years old this year. Yeah it's rusty but it doesn't rot like tomato stakes. I use my old t shirts to tie them up. Gotta cut them and rip them but they rot to nothing.

    Have fun!!!