wild rabbits

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by jackie c, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I've been considering raising some rabbits next year, and was wondering if any of you experts have raised wild rabbits? Would like to know difference in taste, feed, and any other pros and cons. I have lots of wild ones around my place and was thinking of trapping them, is there any advice on how to do this? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    First, if you live in the U.S., you will need to check with your state Fish and Game department to find out if it is even allowed in your state! Most states make it illegal to raise the wild species, while other states require a license or permit. You will also need to know how to identify Tularemia.

    If you are in Europe, you also need to check with your laws, since the "wild" rabbits are of the same species as the "domestic" rabbit (oryctolagus cuniculi) and Brown Hare, both of which may be diseased or carriers of Viral Hemorrhagic Disease, so I don't know what the laws may be in regard to trapping and raising the "wild" species, there.

    What is your purpose in wanting to raise the wild species?

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Association
    http://www.prma.org/
     

  3. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    No specific purpose, there's just so many of them here, but if they are disease prone and regulations I don't want them, I'll go with the domestic, I was just wondering :eek:
     
  4. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    If there are so many around. Why bother with raising any of your own? Just trap or hunt a few from time to time and let mother nature pay for the feed bill.
     
  5. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Now why didn't I think of that! :eek:
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    A couple of issues about this. Sure, you could trap them or hunt them for food. If it is hares that are the wild rabbits in your area, they are subject to population 'boom and bust' cycles. So, you might have a lot around this year, and then the ecology changes about the predators after them (bobcats, coyotes, wolves? etc.) and the numbers could plunge. But, you could take advantage of the abundance while they are there.

    The other thing is I wouldn't recommend attempting to capture them for raising, mainly for the reason of the wildlife regulations don't allow for it in Ontario. Also, being wild creatures, it could be quite difficult with them being stressed and not as much guarantee they would breed or raise their young as effectively as domesticated rabbits. Go with domestic, if you want to raise rabbits. They are also better tasting.
    :)
     
  7. emiliozapata

    emiliozapata Well-Known Member

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    my question is regarding the use of a wild buck to breed to my females as i was hoping to introduce some "hardiness" genes into my breeding stock to help my rabbits survive the MI climate. the trapped buck would be used just to breed once with my does and not housed with or near them. Would this solve tularemia risks as well as other transmissables?
     
  8. icewytch

    icewytch Member

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    hullo. :)
    i live on a small island in the north sea off the UK. here, rabbits were introduced a few hundred years ago and have still a detrimental effect on the small amount of arable land we have here (we are roughly twelve miles long by four at the widest)
    what we do here is freely hunt and shoot them for food (plus i tan my own skins so i use those) and for that, the uk law says you only need the landowners permission to hunt. rabbit here are classed as `vermin`.
    we are careful though, not because they are in danger of dying out, but because every few years miximatosis sweeps throught the burrows.
     
  9. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

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    Emilio
    domestic rabbits are a different species from our cottontails. i asked the same question once & was told by someone whose opinion i respect A LOT that they cannot interbreed & successful attempts to do so result in spontaneous abortion or stillbirth.
     
  10. emiliozapata

    emiliozapata Well-Known Member

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    interesting information, as i never considered genetic differences between the wild rabbits and the domestics. I think i will reconsider the attempted breeding as I feel that once a doe loses one litter she is shot, at least that is my experience. Thank you.
     
  11. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

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    thank Pat Lamar.
    he is the one that told me. if you got the questions the guy is a gold mine of info.