Wild grapes

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by countrygrrrl, May 8, 2004.

  1. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    I have wild grapes --- or at least, I think they're wild. It's possible they're cultivated varieties planted a long time ago.

    I would really like to encourage them to produce. I did get some grapes last year on one stock. But I'm unsure what to do.

    The grapes were entirely tangled up and overgrown with other plants when I first moved out here. It took me a good year, but I got them cleared of multiflora, that bull briar stuff, polk, all kinds of grasses, poison ivy and who knows what else. :rolleyes:

    This spring, I cut all of them back severely (I have three places with old stocks -- at least, I think that's what you call the big main roots) and they've taken off gangbusters.

    But what do I do now? Do I keep snipping off the ends? Should I fertilize them? Or ... ?

    I've also planted some domestic varieties in the yard, if that makes any difference --- although I suspect it doesn't.

    :confused:
     
  2. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    are you going to fertilize them ?are you going to try a trellis on the wild ones ?that way you can get an idea of what they are. next yrs. crop grows on this yrs canes .
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The grapes that grow wild here have tiny grapes about the size of a pea, and are mostly seeds. They can be very invasive and not anything desireable to have around. If your grapes had any grapes more the size of a cherry, then they are domestic grapes.
     
  4. The grapes I saw last summer weren't very big. And boy howdy is it invasive stuff!

    I was hoping, however, at least the taste was good --- which would make it worth the effort. Maybe not, though --- ??

    CG NLI
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The birds will spread the seeds. My fence rows along the roads were totaly covered with them until I started running cattle in the fields. They kept them trimmed down, but once the cattle were gone the grapes were right back. Birds also spread Mulberry seeds. They are worse than grapes in fences and evergreen trees. I don't know anyone who used the grapes. They might make wine.
     
  6. Well, I appreciate the birds spreading the passion flower (I have it everywhere and boy is it pretty! esp. trailing along the fences :) ) and I have some sour (I think) cherry trees right at the fence posts that I know the birds are responsible for.

    But these grapevines are soooooo old and so well trained along the fence that I'd hope3d it was purposeful. :rolleyes: Dang!!

    Then again, the whole place was totally grown over when I got here. Lovely land, I'm not sure why people didn;t take care of it properly.

    So that's that, the wild grapes are history and I'm starting more domestic ones down there instead because I do like the way the vines look!

     
  7. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    The tiny wild ones are fox grapes and I picked a boat load when I was 12 or so and made jam. I got about 1/4 of a small jar for all the work.
     
  8. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie "You have to be odd to be number one." Dr Seuss

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    I have wild grapes running over one side of my barn. It's a big bank barn and by fall the vines will have reached the top. I don't do much with them because they're rather small, bigger than a pea but smaller than a cherry. However, the chickens love them! The purple chicken poop is so artistic! Adds such lovely color in the fall.

    Stacy in NY
     
  9. primal1

    primal1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Purple chicken poop, what a riot! hehe

    I have three 2" thick old vines that stand about 20' feet tall in three trees they have killed. How would one go about getting these under control? I've been thinking of cutting the trees down and then proping them up on some cedar fence posts so then i could start pruning.... these vines at the moment are FULL of young grapes.
    Should i wait till fall and is this the best way?

    thanks.
     
  10. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    Wild grapes are small. About 1/2 to 1/3 the size of concord grapes.
    They are very prolific.
    They will destroy a woods and trees if left go.
    They can be used in jams and/or wine - using about 1/2 what the receip
    calls for in concord.
    They should not be harvested until after a hard frost.
    Have made jelly and wine from them. Tastey.
    The vines are a pain in the backside.
    The people that know - foresters - say that there are 7 years of seeds in the
    ground that if you kill all the existing vines - you will have to continue for the
    next 7 years to eradicate all of them.
    Any other questions?
     
  11. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    We have wild grapes along the entire front of the property running along the river. Over 600 feet of tangled mangled mess. Some of this stuff is even trying to cross the river. The grapes are bigger than peas, smaller than cherries, but it doesn't matter....the birds eat them all before we get to try out a wine or jam recipe :( The one thing we have used them for is stuffed grape leaves.....yum!
     
  12. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Yoikes, Doc. You just convinced me. There's some vines I'm going out to cut ... now! :eek:

     
  13. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Hey, Countrygrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrl (there's some more 'r's' for you!)

    If you're cutting the grapes, save the vines for baskets or wreaths. The thick, heavy stuff can even make furniture, depending on it's diameter.

    Meg :)
     
  14. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    :D I'm eternally indebted to you for all the r's, Meg!

    I was thinking the same thing --- I cut some HUGE vines a little earlier, then went around and chopped some smaller ones. There's grapevines throughout the trees here, though --- I've debated since I got here whether to chop them. Soooo, yea - I may have enough to make a nice chair for the front porch! :)
     
  15. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    I have some wild grapes growing along and old fence on the west side of my house. I let it stay because it grows in the tops of one tree onto the next and creates shade by filling in all the open spaces. Plus none of the trees growing there are worth anything (more of those obnoxious mulberry trees. I have 6 along the fence rows by my yard and dozens of seedlings trying to take over).

    Do chickens eat mulberries? The wild birds just can't keep up! and they totally ignored them until they had eaten all my cherries :(

    Mel-
     
  16. primal1

    primal1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wild grapes do make the best jelly and jam, i made 6 large mason jars from the berries i collected last fall.... still have a jar left.
    Any of you guys who eat game meats like deer and boar should try wild grape jelly with the meat MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM... it even tastes awesome on store bought pork. hehe.
    I don't drink but would so love to taste the wine... might have to try making some.
     
  17. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to add that anywhere the vines contact the ground the plant will put down roots.
    Therefore they are hard to get rid of.
    One way is to put antifreeze or an toxin on the newly cut vine and that should help; otherwise there will be new growth next year.