Wild Blackberries???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fordy, May 8, 2004.

  1. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............On the northern end of my property I have a very healthy and growing community of what I believe is wild blackberries. They are very small and very sweet if they live long enough to ripen. Of course, birds, bees and all other creatures that like sweets start harvesting before they reach maturity. The thorns on their vines are like the "needles from Hell" and only the brave venture into their inner sanctum. I don't know if they can be harvested and canned or what. They are on MY side of the fence so I (as the Only Human with access) have thought about maybe trying to save some for future consumption. I putup a sign with Big red letters that said "All Winged Trespassors will Be Shot" and I was promply stung by a Bee whom didn't like My attitude I suppose. Maybe I will just sample the "Fruit" and let Mother Nature allocate her Resources as SHE see's fit. ........fordy.. :eek: :)
     
  2. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Fordy,

    Bees pollinate the blackberries for you. I think the only times bees might be interested in the berries themselves would be once they start to go (drunken bees anyone?)

    Mike
     

  3. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    Fordy, you said "if they live long enough for them to ripen" does this mean the leaves turn brown and die before the berries mature? I live in Mississippi and we have enjoyed blackberries all my life up until a few years age and now the brambles have some kind of disease that defoliates the two year old plants before the fruit ripens. I've checked disease books,asked the county agent and I can't find anything that resembles the symptoms that they show. I personally think that some kind of virus has been released that is supposed to "CONTROL" those bad ole briars. I can't confirm this for the USA but I did find an article where this was done in Australia.
    Blackberries are a very beneficial plant (roots, leaves and berries) and I am sick about not being able to harvest them anymore, maybe with time they will over come it but I don't expect it in my lifetime.
    The dewberries are starting to get ripe here and the blackberries are loaded down with fruit but they look like a fire has gone through them, the fruit will be no good.

    Tom
     
  4. charles

    charles Well-Known Member

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    Heelpin,

    Drive up to God's country, the northern part of the State between Batesville and Tupelo. Ours have no problem. Pick all you want, in fact, pull all you want too. The beasties are everywhere.
     
  5. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've discovered a nice stand of dewberries on our farm, which are a wild blackberry. The thorns are not nearly so mean if you wear garden gloves to pick. ;)
    Youngest son and I go out with cups to pick, and I always tell him to be sure and eat a few as he goes to make it enjoyable. ;) Last time, when my cup was full, his was still empty, but he was happy. lol.
    If we have any left after we've had our fill, I freeze them on a plate, then bag them for the freezer.
     
  6. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    Charles, glad to hear that, I'm tempted, there's nothing better for sick stomach or diarrhea than blackberries. I think they could cure some serious gut problems if you used them right.
    I hope what we have here is just localized and doesn't spread, it has destroyed the fruit but we still have to contend with the briars.
    I'll be headed North come Fall!

    Tom