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Discussion Starter #1
My husband brought me a baby bunny. He found it when he was working ground today in preparation for planting crops. It was running around in the field, probably because it's nest got destroyed by the machinery.

It's eyes are open and it can hop around, though it pretty much just sits totally still. I put some grass in the cage with it, but I don't think it's eaten any. I don't know if this bunny should be able to eat on it's own or if I should attempt to feed it some formula. I hate bottle feeding wild things, as I usually end up killing them.

Any help would be appreciated.

Jena
 

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Jena said:
My husband brought me a baby bunny. He found it when he was working ground today in preparation for planting crops. It was running around in the field, probably because it's nest got destroyed by the machinery.

It's eyes are open and it can hop around, though it pretty much just sits totally still. I put some grass in the cage with it, but I don't think it's eaten any. I don't know if this bunny should be able to eat on it's own or if I should attempt to feed it some formula. I hate bottle feeding wild things, as I usually end up killing them.

Any help would be appreciated.

Jena
Jena, I have never seen a wild baby rabbit survive.
 

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Jena- you can try offering it milk in a saucer. Wild rabbits are much smaller than domestic rabbits of the same age so it might be able to survive- I pulled mine out of a dogs mouth when it was about small enough to sit in the palm of my hand- fully furred and eyes open and only one bad cut- it was able to drink milk from a saucer and eat bread, but it wouldn't eat grass for awhile- mine lived to be about 7 years old. And he always loved his dish of milk.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I got the bunny to take a little bit of milk/egg yolk with an eye dropper. I read that overfeeding is the number one killer, so I quit with that. I'll try the dish though....and bread.

I don't have high hopes for his survival, but he'd have zero back in the field.

Jena
 

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;) My wife and found four baby bunnies a few years ago and they did fine. We used a dropper at first using skim milk with a small amount of canned milk. Then used a toy plastic baby bottle to feed them several times a day. All did well and were later released on our property. Just don't over feed them and don't use too much heavy cream.
We also used a card board box lined with crass clippings.
Good luck
 
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I second the squirrel world link post above. LouRea is wonderful with
e-communication and has tremendous amounts of useful info on her site. If its eyes are open you are lucky. Eyes closed are difficult because they require the soft feces of the mother to keep their gut flora in check and thus be able to digest their food. That's why baby rabbits are so difficult to get to survive because few people know this, few people have access to the special night time soft droppings and the kit gets diarrhea and dies. Get puppy or kitten replacement formula over the general cow's milk. There is not quite enough protein or the right kind of fats in it. Goat's milk is a little better than cow's. I won't discredit the results some have gotten using bread as they posted, but per my experience and research (I do wildlife rehabilitation) one isn't supposed to feed rabbits grains or refined grain products as that increases the rabbit's chance for enteritis which they are susceptible to anyway. Offer fresh greens (no iceberg lettuce or cabbage), maybe a slice of apple or berries, clover, grass clippings, any food that will provide them more fiber than sugar. If it will take the dropper, go for it. You will eventually get a feel for how full is "full" so start light like you are doing. Follow the website link above's advice for feedings and frequencies. Good luck and enjoy the experience.
Charles' Wife
 

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We saved three a couple of years ago. If its eyes are open you can probably feed rabbit pellets. We also fed cabbage, small amounts, and grasses they would find in their habitat. Just happened to have a rabbit cage that we put a flower pot on its side for them to hide in.

At the time we were building a new chicken house and transfered them to it in order to have more room to exercise. After a week I started leaving the door open and one day they were gone. I still leave water out for them or their offspring.

We didn't try to tame them because we wanted them to keep its fear in order to survive. Give them lots of peace and quiet.

Yvonne
 

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Same thing happened to us pretty much. Looks like the nest was raided by some predator and her siblings were killed. Eyes open and fully furred. We started the lil darling on puppy replecement and shes doing fabulous! gaining weight and size daily. We also give her rabbit pellets, (The commercial kind not the rear end kind :no: ) and all the veggies we can find or have. She's rough on carrots and dandelions I tell ya! She's also very curious and friendly. Good luck with yours!
 

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I found a little bunny last year, but he didn't make it. :( I seem to recall it was something very basic and obvious that I did not do --- I was also told that many of them die from shock.

One thing I did this year was to raise the mower blades very very high - it makes for much more mowing, but so far I've passed over two nests (that I know of) without harming them.

They're cute little guys, aren't they? :)
 

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Hi,
I know this is going against the grain, but i'll say it anyway. Why bother with the rabbit. It's not endangered, it just an old garden eating, disease carrying varmit. Your place would proably be better off by not having it around. I dislike rabbits, especially wild ones. I hate them with a passion. Garden theiving rats with long ears and a short tail.

I would suggest a quick blow to the back of the head with a rubber mallet , that should fix'em good

Want some good receipies????

Be good
Jagger
 

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My dad used to bring them home to us all the time. He'd knock over a burrow with his dozer and feel bad about the babies. we used to feed them formula with an eyedropper and they all did pretty well. In fact, a box full got loose once and we found all but one. Thought maybe the dogs had got him, but 3 weeks later the little fellow hopped out from under the chifferobe in the hallway looking a bit scrawny but otherwise okay. Figured in a house with five kids, he had survived on crumbs and dropped food and the odd oreo cookie under the couch. Good luck with them. ;)
 

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My parents raised a couple of thumbsized pinkies they found one morning in their frozen driveway. They must've fallen off the momma when she left the burrow. They bottle fed with kitten milk replacer until those things were 4 months old. They were half grown! When their eyes were open and they got furry, they offered a bit of oatmeal, grain, seed, fresh clover and alfalfa, vegetable peelings, eventually adding commercial rabbit food to the diet.

Mom made bunny nests out of an old angora sweater. At first, the nest was in my dad's pocket where he could keep them warm and feed them the few drops at a time, then into a small box in a lunch pail. My parents took the bunnies everywhere with them, even to their doctors appointments, because of the care they needed. Feeding and stimulating was pretty much a full time job.

I imagine a bunny old enough to run would be too old to attempt bottle feeding. The saucer or dropper may work a little, but going with a more natural diet of what is available in their habitat would be better for the bunny.
 

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Jagger becasue some people care. If you are going to say things like that in a thread about saving something go away. :rolleyes:


Dandelions are a favorite of ours. Shes taking puppy formula and lots of fresh veggies, grasses, rabbit food, etc. just never too much of anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Jagger said:
Hi,
I know this is going against the grain, but i'll say it anyway. Why bother with the rabbit. It's not endangered, it just an old garden eating, disease carrying varmit. Your place would proably be better off by not having it around. I dislike rabbits, especially wild ones. I hate them with a passion. Garden theiving rats with long ears and a short tail.

I would suggest a quick blow to the back of the head with a rubber mallet , that should fix'em good

Want some good receipies????

Be good
Jagger
This bunny would hardly make a mouthful.

I don't garden so don't have anything against bunnies. I do understand where you are coming from though. I am heartless when it comes to coons, possums and mice. If I find a nest of mice, I feed the babies to the chickens...alive.

Jena
 
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Jena said:
My husband brought me a baby bunny. He found it when he was working ground today in preparation for planting crops. It was running around in the field, probably because it's nest got destroyed by the machinery.

It's eyes are open and it can hop around, though it pretty much just sits totally still. I put some grass in the cage with it, but I don't think it's eaten any. I don't know if this bunny should be able to eat on it's own or if I should attempt to feed it some formula. I hate bottle feeding wild things, as I usually end up killing them.

Any help would be appreciated.

Jena
Do you have any eye droppers? If you do put milk with a little bit of lukewarm water in a cup and put it in the microwave for 18 seconds. Then feed the rabbit until it starts licking it's lips. (That means it's full.) Feed it every 2 hours.
 

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Jena! You are reading a whole thread on this subject right now! Did you forget how to read? Do so..check out the links left for you and you will know how to care for the bunny and how to protect your family from all of the diseases it is capable of giving to you.

LQ
 
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yesterday my cat brought in a baby rabbit. it is so small that it is smaller than my palm. my mom and i have been feeding it kitten formala out of a baby bottle. it has been drinking and for a bed we put him in a box with a sweatshirt and have been heating up two water bottles to keep him warm. so far he has been doing good i have done this kind of thing before but not this small of rabbit please email me at [email protected]
thank you so much

chandra
 
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jagger that is so rude to kill an animal that did nothing to you why would you be so cruel and mean sorry but that is my opinion
 
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