Wild baby bunny emergency

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by TexasArtist, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    While cooking dinner tonight my moms dog found a patch of baby bunnies. All but one were killed. How do I take care of the little guy??

    The baby has hair and is smaller then the palm of my hand, not including the fingers here. I'm not sure if the little eyes are open or not. I've had him/her about 3 hours and has been sleeping all that time.
    How do I tell how old the baby is?? Is there some special diet to feed him/her?

    Thanks for the help
     
  2. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    Call your state fish/wildlife office. Ask them for a referral to the nearest wildlife rehabber that handles rabbits. Rehabbers are licensed/trained to handle wild animals so they can be re-introduced to the wild after recouperating from injuries.
     
  4. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    We had that happen with our kitties once, the cats killed the mother. We fed them baby food spinach from a jar, they did real good. Once they were little bunnies, and older, we put them back outside. Try not to handle them alot, keep them wild, and put them outside once they are about 4 to 6 weeks old (sounds like yours are right around 2 weeks). Give them graze from outside in about a week in addition to the spinach. You can stop giving them spinach at 4 weeks if they are doing well. Just don't try to tame them too much. At least 1 of the 2 we put outside did fine, there was always one bunny on our property that was not as scared as the rest, but still kept it's distance. Sure was interested in us, though. :)
     
  5. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    Greens I don't believe, as a whole, really shouldn't be given to kits or anything that isn't already on solid food to begin with. And even then greens should only be given sparingly as diarrhea, and therefore dehydration, could result. Spinach, specifically, has goitrogenic properties and contains oxalates which tend to block the absorption of calcium and therefore potentially weakens bones - especially developing ones.

    As I suggested earlier, it may be best to contact a wildlife rehabber that knows what they're doing with rabbits....
     
  6. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    BTW, this info was given to us from the local vet and they said it would work fine. I have also heard this information from major show rabbit breeders in the Illinois area, and I have used this method myself, both on wild and domestic rabbits. Yes, it is not as good as mother's milk, but as far as I know they don't make rabbit replacer! We fed it with a syringe. No, they weren't as plump and healthy as a rabbit on it's mother, but it helped them live, grow and ultimately get back out into the wild, where they could eat more of their natural "stuff". BTW, that is why Alfalfa is not as good for them as grass, alfalfa has a high content of green leafy, high protein. It can give diarrhea. I don't know why the spinach never did with our though, I just know you can use it.
     
  7. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    For milk replacer the puppy stuff is recommended. Also you have to make sure to stimulate the babies to make them go to the bathroom. :eek: Of course finding a rehab person is best!
     
  8. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    I understand that the instructions may have come from a veterinarian. Unfortunately, if I followed every bit of incorrect information that I have received from "local" vets that I have dealt with regarding the majority of my animals they would have all ceased to be long ago. Example, a midnight emergency trip to an exotic "specialist" with a giant green iguana that for some reason blew up like a football within a two hour timeframe. Fortunately, by the time the hour long drive to the vet was over she returned to normal size. X-rays were taken and an exam performed regardless. I proceeded to argue with the "specialist" that the iguana was gravid as I could clearly see upwards of 14 eggs clearly on the film. The "specialist" told me I was seeing things, pronounced the iguana healthy, accepted a fee approaching extortion for the level of care that he provided and sent us home. Three weeks later the iguana remained healthy and laid 36 eggs successfully.

    Unfortunately, in my experience, unless it's a dog, cat, horse or cow iit can be more of a crapshoot when you take an animal in to a vet. By the same token, there are plenty of diagnoses and procedures that should be performed only by a qualified vet. Unlike their human counterparts, most veterinarians simply do not have the luxury of being able to actually specialize in any one particular animal which, unfortunately, can work against them. Most do the best that they know how - sometimes that just simply isn't good enough.
     
  9. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    Very true, but if you noted above, I also have direct experience with it, and so have other major rabbit breeders. Never said it was the "technical perfectionist" way to do it, just said it would work.
     
  10. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    How is the little bunny doing? Let us know!
     
  11. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    I would like to thank every for their advice. I tried to return him to his mommy but she wouldn't take care of him anymore. I had touched him so like many wildlife she rejected him. :( I took him back in and tried to feed the little guy but it was just to late and Mr. hoppy died the next morning. :waa: I took him out to the back pasture and buried the little guy where I would have set him loose.
    Rest in peice Mr. Hoppy
     
  12. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    On another note. I have learned a lesson about this board there's very few people that will help when you ask for it. Instead of helping they would rather blast you and treat you like you were some sort of murderer and you did some things on purpose. You bunny forum folks really did try and help adn I can not thank you enough, but the homesteading part where I post the same question I didn't get to much help. Just got told how bad I was. :( Did my post really sound like I went out and dug up the bunnies on purpose? or that I trained my dogs to do such a thing?? I'd realy like to know. I thought I was pretty clear on how things came about me finding the little guy and his brothers/sisters. I guess not. :(
    Once again I'd like to thank the helpfull peole of the bunny forum
     
  13. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    I had no idea, I am going to go take a look.... Yes, you probably could have left the bunny, and it would have been better, but hey, you didn't know, and you were trying to do the best you could. Mother still might not have taken care of it anyhow, because the dog had "touched" it. So don't worry, you did the best you could. I didn't have any issue whatsoever. Obviously you didn't purposely let the dog get it.
     
  14. 2horses

    2horses I'm a silly filly!! Supporter

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    I went and read the other thread and I thought folks were helpful on there, too. Yeah, maybe one or two threw a general opinion about rehoming wildlife out there, but I didn't get the impression they were blasting you for anything personally. Just take those kind of posts with a grain of salt, and not to heart. From what I read most were sympathetic and helpful and wishing you the best of luck - which is pretty much what you'll find in any one of the forums on this board! :) Sorry if a couple seemed harsh to you, though.

    The bottom line is you tried your best, and we're sorry you lost the little bun anyway - that's the worst part! But at least you tried.

    Pam :cool: <------- has gotten to know some of the more frequent posters, and realizes most comments are typical for them...
     
  15. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    I was a participant in that "other" thread. It's not at all your fault that the dogs got the doe and I do not believe anyone saddled you with any blame for that. Accidents DO happen. Having said that, you admitted to not knowing how to properly care for orphaned kits. Knowing that, did you attempt to locate and/or contact any local wildlife rehabilitation facilities at all as was suggested? Or did you take the "advice" of complete and total faceless strangers trapped in a box that had absolutely zero way of knowing the particular health of the kits you were dealing with and attempt to keep the kits alive yourself? Would they have lived with a licensed, educated rehabber or even a veterinarian trained to detect injuries or poor health as opposed to a well-meaning but unprepared animal lover that was "trying to do the right thing" ?

    Sorry if it feels like I'm beating up on you yet again but there are reasons for things like wildlife rehabitation, the individuals trained to handle it, and the laws that surround and govern it as well. I've seen this too many times to care to think about with native snakes and amphibians.

    Do I feel bad that the kit died? Absolutely... Do I feel bad that when people freely ask for advice they don't like some of the advice given to them and become disgruntled because they don't get the answers they were looking for?? Absolutely not. You asked...People offered various advice...You chose the advice that you'd follow... The rabbit is dead... Who's fault is it? No one that offered ANY of the free advice that you got. There's just nothing I can say to change that... Sorry....
     
  16. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    Give me a break. LOL