Why would doe dry up?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by squirrelgirl, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. squirrelgirl

    squirrelgirl Active Member

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    We have a 3 year old Nubian doe and in about 1 1/2 weeks she went from giving about 2 quarts to 1/2 quart. Nothing changed in her diet, she acted the same, and I milked her on the same schedule I had for about 5 months. I want milk alot longer than this. Any ideas why she would dry up that much in that short of time? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well do you know if, in previous years, this would have been time for her to dry up? If she was bred later than usual this year her body clock may have been set. Other that that it could be worms, heat or being pregnant. But that is still a big drop in a short amount of time...

    Christy
     

  3. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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    how much is she drinking? did the temperature drop? When it is cooler they drink less. Try giving her warm water to encourage her to drink more.

    Also goats do have a natural time when they drop in production, this maybe hers.
     
  4. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    We found this to be true in the dairy, and why we would rather grow out our own replacements rather than purchase milkers. When a doe is milked her first and second lacation for a short time (perhaps she nursed kids for 12 weeks, or was hand milked for 3 months) the following years they simply have no will to milk through our heat. We had it happen to much for it to be coincidence. Why it's important you set the lacation in your own does, or purchase from those who will be milking as long as you do. Others don't have this happen to them...a friend of mine has a doe who went top 10 in milking after other shorter lacations :)

    I would worm her or fecal sample, check the hay feeders for mold, clean out and check if anything has happened to the waterer. Also this time of year the mills change from liuqid molassas to dry molassas so the grain isn't a cinder block when you pour it, also they move oils, if her grain is unpalatable because it has linseed oil or another smelly oil, if she eats less calories she makes less milk. My does nearly the day they are bred start on the slow road decline. Right now the girls are due end of Feb, and we are down to once a day milking, and protecting every drop! Certainly no flush of milk out in the barn this time of year, but they will make 10 months. Vicki
     
  5. squirrelgirl

    squirrelgirl Active Member

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    This was the first year I had her and the first year she was milked she just raised her kids the years before. That may be what the problem was. This actually happened back in September (been very busy this was the first chance I had to post) so it was not cold and we had very mild heat then. She has access to all the water she can drink. If she starts this next time what can I do?
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    There isn't anything to do, we just kept milking them because we needed the milk. But limit their grain, feeding alot of grain to a doe giving only 2 or 3 pounds of milk is wasteing your money, it would be better to dry her. And it does get to that point even in bred does, where it simply isn't worth the time to go out and milk that 2 pounds out :)

    When you raise out your own kids, and believe me you will like your own kids as milkers soo much better, they can have longer lactations because you train them to it, they have your temperment. Buying other peoples goats is like trying to raise other peoples children! Mine mind me soo much better!

    So another question to the folks you buy goats from...that list is getting mighty long! How long do you milk for? Because if a doe only nurses kids for 12 weeks, she isn't going to make much of a milker. vicki