Why is our Husky dog doing this???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Hears The Water, Mar 25, 2004.

  1. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Andy my dd's male Husky mix is realy ticking me off!!! He has taken to going around the house marking things. He is a two year old and he has been neuterd. He is just now lifting his leg to pee, but has been lifting his leg to mark for quite a while now. He has this realy annoying habit of just marking stuff. Last week it was a 50 lb bag of wheat whe had not yet put into a bucket. He has marked my piano, my table, my son's bed corner, and he realy likes plastic bags. A couple of times we have had trash bags with different things in them, like toys, clothes, paper trash, and he will mark them. I am getting pretty frustrated. He is an inside dog for the most part. He goes on a chain for short intervals at a time. I think he may be frustrated because DD does not take him for runs, and he cannot go free because he kills our chickens. He also barely eats and is very finacky (sp) when he does eat. He realy likes canned food, but hates dry. He is a good dog I love him, but I think if he pees on one more of my things I am going to take him back to the pound where we got him....*sigh* no, not realy. I love him too, I am just frustrated and would welcome any and all advice here. Thanks in advance. BTW we have three more dogs, all female all spayed and we also have four cats, all fixed, two males and two females. I don't know if this will make any difference or not.
    God bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  2. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    My blue heeler that was fixed still lifts and pees like his brother, (not fixed) The fixed one still humps females.

    As for the marking, what have you tryed?
    Spray bottle of water, screaming fit (this is what finally worked to housebreak my heelers), firm scolding as they have to stay near the spot (use a leash with your foot on it) basicly he does it because he can get away with it. He is saying it is his terriory to mark as he feels the need. It sounds funny/odd but it could help if your husband would pee in the dogs area and on him a few times. There is no mistaking who is boss then.

    They like to pee on plastic because it holds the smell really well, yhew-wie!!
     

  3. sheeplady

    sheeplady Well-Known Member

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    I have read that putting a bellyband on can curtail this. You can buy them in a dog supply catalogue or try to make one. Basically its a wide cloth band with a liner, washable cotton or use disposable pad, like sanitary napkin, and the band has velcro on the ends. Secure it around the dog over his urethra when he is in the house. Supposedly after lifting his leg a few times the dog will be disgusted with this wet pad on and will be cured of doing the marking bit. Worth a try anyway.
     
  4. It will only take one time.Well worth the time.Works on any animal that cant stay off of something or has to pee on everthing
     
  5. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Northern Sled Dogs are very basic creatures. They have a high prey drive and a need for physical exersize. That's what they were bred for! They react to boredom and to challenges to hierarchy matters very basically. too. I can see why your dog is doing what he's doing. You have no business having a high energy dog like this without giving him the exersize and challenges that he needs to stay mentally and physically healthy. He is young, he is bored. He is bred to travel all day long! ON top of this you have a multiple dog household with no idea how to handle pack structure or what it is and how it impacts canine behavior. Do your dog a favor....find him a home with someone who understands what he requires and get a chihuahua!

    LQ
     
  6. I agree with quaker. Your dog is probably as aggravated with you, as you are with it. Huskies do not eat much for their size as a matter of fact.
    They will kill and some will even hunt food. So they do not belong around non-canine animals.
    Sled dogs can and need to be run everyday.
    These dogs can run 15-25 miles a day, no problem. If you don't let them, they decome destructive. He may start digging and chewing, slowly tearing apart your house.
    Alot of people today are putting their dogs on a treadmill for execise. I would suggest that if you can't provide the work that this dog needs you turn it over to a huskie rescue group.
    I had just the other day a friend say they were looking at a huskie. Small house, small kids, no time, not an outdoors person, not to mention not a dog sledder! I told him not to do it. I'm sorry if I am attacking you, I am only speaking the truth. There are many dog breeds that breeders and petshops say are great family dogs that just have no business in a family setting.
     
  7. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm afraid that I have to agree with LQ and Magic Panda on this one. I almost feel sorry for the dog and I don't mean that as a reflection on your caring for the dog. I think that you just don't understand the animals needs. Contact a rescue group for that breed.

    (Don't get a chihuahua! The cats might think it is a large mouse! ;) )
     
  8. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dave, I have to disagree (politely) with you. Right now, there is a big baby of a doggy sleeping in my kitchen who, if he had his way, would live in our house! Oh, he enjoys doing his rounds outside, but once that's done, he wants to be in here!
    Only problem is that he also loves to find "odoriforus" stuff to roll in too. Oy vey!

    (Enough thread drift ;) )
     
  9. Hears The Water

    Hears The Water Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you all for your valued suggestions. I will take them all into consideration. Especially now that I came home today and one of the dogs had eaten the back off our couch. Yes, the back off the couch. you can see the springs, foam and wood. It was a yucky couch to begin with but it was all we had. The big problem was that we where all gone and there was no one here to watch them. So we are not sure if it was Andy or my puppy, (black lab) Emma. But I am betting on Andy.

    LQ, I am going to choose to believe that you feel very passionatly about Huskies and that is why you chose the words that you did, not that you where personally attacking me. But realy, that was my first reaction. But we all know that it is impossible to read tone of voice, so I realy don't know how you would have said it if you where standing face to face with me.

    We adopted Andy for my dd almost two years ago. We where not setting out to choose a dog that day. We where in a local Pets Mart where they have the Humaine Society come in and offer dogs for adoption. We could hear these pitiful cries from the back of the store and when we where looking at the dogs we saw this Husky/German Shephard Mix desperatly trying to get out of the cage he was in. Devon was looking at him and she made eye contact with him and she siad later that she could see into his soul. She was convinced that this was the dog for her. I understand what she means. Emma is like that for me. If I had it to do all over again, I would not have gotten him. I would never recomend a Husky to anyone who is not willing to make the time for one of these dogs, or has cats, or small barnyard animals. Or even small animals in the home. But this is all hindsight. We have him and love him. So I wonder, do any of you who think I should find a Husky rescue have any suggestions as to how to deal with my daughter who will have a broken heart? I am serious about that question, not being snotty or anything. I have suggested once before that maybee we needed to find him a home where he would be better able to fit in. But I was voted down. Perhaps now that the couch is toast I will be better able to make these kind of suggestions. Any and all advice is appreceated.

    BTW, A chihuahua wouldn't last long at our house, the other dogs are German Shorthair Pointers and a Black Lab. One of our cats weights seventeen pounds and the other is around twenty. The two females are normal sized though. Any of the above listed would love nothing more than to eat a small doggie. Besides too shakey for me. I need serene dogs.

    God Bless you and yours
    Debbie
     
  10. creymc

    creymc Active Member

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    I dont really think you need to surrender your dog to a rescue group if youre willing to make a few changes. It sounds like this dog has been passed around enough and at least we know hes loved where he's at which is half the battle right? Sled dogs do however need a lot of exercise. Maybe you could put a little scrae into your daughter telling her that if she doesnt start tending to his needs better he will have to go. I also suggest doing a little bit of research on pack animals. This is very typical behavior.He's challenging you to find his place in the pack and if you let it get too far out of hand he will ALWAYS be in charge. There are ways to let him know whos boss and an obidence class thats focused on positive reinforcement will do wonders.

    good luck!
     
  11. I would first like to commend you on your higher level of thinking. It takes alot to see when people are just being honest and concerned. Many people would not react so positively to the advice we have given you. :) So you deserve credit. I would simply inform your dauhter of her responsibilty towards the dog. The dog must be walked twice a day atleast two miles. Make her do that. The dog should be involved in some kind of workout a few times a week. Many people do load pulling work with their dogs. So get a wagon and a dog harness. Get some books or read online. Even just trying to develop this pulling behavior in your dog will make it happier. Pulling is what they love. You could try obedience, agility any dog sport you can think of. Just give her the responsibility of completing these tasks with the caveat that should she not, the dog will have to go. You can involve any other dogs aswell (in the fun). As far as the explaining or how to deal with her being upset. I would let it stand that these are the rules if they are broken it will be her fault that the dog goes and she will have to deal with it. I know that sounds harsh but learning to accept consquences and then deal with them is very important. Sometimes people say I am cold but rather, I learned young the facts of being responsible and taking responsibilty.Good luck
     
  12. LisaBug

    LisaBug Well-Known Member

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    Debbie, you've received both good and not so good advice here. First of all, huskies really do need exercise and not just on a leash. If possible fence in a play area, as large as you can make it. Even running and playing in that sort of a situation will help Andy's destructiveness. Is there any reason he can't stay out in a kennel/fenced area part of the day? Perhaps make the fencing tall/strong (bury the bottom foot and line with rocks) enough for all the dogs to stay out a portion each day. I know they'll drag in dirt and mud, been there done that. That should also help him with his peeing, give them a short log placed upright to have their 'peeing contests' on. With his eating, try adding water to dry food, let it soak maybe 5 minutes and feed. Or change feeds but keep it a dry type food. We used a couple different kinds before we found one the dogs like and we feed it wet all year. What they don't eat right away is taken and given to the chickens (rarely happens). Now, if you need to discipline a husky one of the best ways is to roll him over, hold his muzzle in your hand and give him a stern talking to. He's being put in a submissive position and it does work.

    A young male was giving us attitude problems so every time he tried to prove his dominance we rolled him over, grabbed his muzzle and sternly talked to him. Sometimes it turned into quite the wrestling match. We've seen quite a change in him, from bully to buddy. Something else to remember, Huskies are a 'wild' dog and right now spring is in the air. That could be part of it. Don't give up, some dogs are more hard headed than others and it could take the right combination of different ideas to help.

    How do we know this? Right now we have a sled dog kennel of 18 Siberian Huskies and a Golden Retriever. When a female comes into season they usually come in the house. After the newness wears off some of the girls get a bit ticked and start pooping and destroying stuff. More excercise helps to curb this. I don't mean to step on any toes but we've had quite a bit of experience with this.

    Good luck!

    LisaBug
     
  13. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Debbie,
    Sorry to hear about your dog problems! You've had some great advice, and since you have two GSPs, and a lab, I'm sure you are used to high energy dogs. I agree that marking is usually a behavioral problem. Have you caught him doing it? The reason I ask is that we had a Keeshond that we thought was marking. It turned out that he had kidney problems, and just couldn't make it until we got home. I hope that your dogs problem is behavioral, and can be fixed with excercise and training, because those kidney ailments seem to be chronic. My parents had a beagle that ate the couch. He had separation anxiety. If it's not one thing, it's another :rolleyes: !