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heather said:
THANKS!
I was using one yesterday & got to wondering about it -
For God's sake, when you're using tools please keep your attention on the task at hand. When you start daydreaming and your mind wanders you increase the chance of injury exponentially. Case in point: Mr. Philips forehead :D
 

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freeinalaska said:
They used to be a trademark of Allen Manufacturing Company.
That which we know as an "Allen wrench" was originally a trademark of the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut. They effected the trademark 1943.

Some people don't just talk about them, some actually know how to use them (and do).


:rolleyes: YAY! :rolleyes:
 

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Happy Scrounger
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what about torx? (inquiring minds want to know)

ever wonder why a "spoon" is actually called a spoon and not "bowl on a stick"? I do...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wisconsin Ann said:
ever wonder why a "spoon" is actually called a spoon and not "bowl on a stick"? I do...
wonder no more............


The English word spoon derives from Old English spōn, meaning "chip or splinter of wood or horn carved from a larger piece, shaving," from a Proto-Germanic root spūnuz (cf. Old Norse spann, sponn "chip, splinter," Swedish spÃ¥n "a wooden spoon," Old Frisian spon, Medieval Dutch spaen, Dutch spaan, Old High German spān, German Span "chip, splinter"), in turn deriving from the Proto-Indo-European root spe-, denoting 'a long piece of wood', probably in the sense of a wedge (cf. Greek sphen "wedge").[1]
 
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