Why doesn't my cheese melt?

Discussion in 'Dairy' started by Whisperwindkat, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. Whisperwindkat

    Whisperwindkat Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand it, my colby and monterey jack cheese just doesn't melt in the oven. If I take a slice of it and put it in the microwave for a few seconds then it melts fine into a delicious gooey pile of cheese. However, in the oven it simply turns crispy. I made mac and cheese yesterday that simply was not fit to eat because the cheese didn't melt. I don't know what to do or what I did wrong? Help, please.
     
  2. suzyhomemaker09

    suzyhomemaker09 Well-Known Member

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    It would help if you could post your recipe...helps anyone who knows troubleshoot
     

  3. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    If it's goat cheese, the proteins are different. It just will *not* melt the same. I've had the same frustration.
     
  4. Whisperwindkat

    Whisperwindkat Well-Known Member

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    Here are the recipes that I am using:

    Monterey Jack
    1 gallon milk ( I use raw goat milk)
    2-4 oz. buttermilk
    1/4 tsp. rennet

    Bring milk to 88 degrees, add buttermilk and stir
    ripen for 15 minutes
    mix 1/4 tsp. renet in 1/4 c. cool water and add to milk. stir for 1 minute.
    allow to set fo 30 minutes or until clean break is obtained
    cut curds to 1/2 inch cubes and let stand for 5 minutes
    heat slowly, while stirring, for 1 hour bringing the temperature to 100 degrees
    remove from heat and stop stirring
    when curds sink to bottom of pan remove whey to 1 inch above curds
    while stirring add cold water to reduce temp to 85 degrees stir curds and additional 5 minutes
    drain curds well, add canning salt and place into sterile muslin cloth. tie up into a ball and place on a dinner plate. place a 2nd plate on top, upside down, apply a 6-8 pound weight on top and let sit overnight.
    Remove cloth the next day and air dry.

    Colby Cheese
    warm 2 gal milk (again I use raw goat) and 1/2 c. buttermilk to 86 degrees
    add 1 tsp. rennet to 1/2 c. cool water, stir into milk and let sit for 30 minutes or until clean break is achieved
    cut curd into 1/2 in. cubes let rest 10 minutes

    increase the temp of the cheese gradually to 100 degrees, stirring gently
    hold temp for 30 minutes
    drain whey to level of curd
    add cool water to bring the temp down to 80, hold temp for 20 minutes
    lift curds into a colander, drain for 20 minutes then add 1 T. salt mixing well
    place curds into clean muslin cloth, tie into a ball and place on dinner plate with another plate upside down on top. press overnight with 6-8 pounds
    unwrap the next day and let air dry. age for 6-8 weeks

    Thanks for any help. Blessings, Kat
     
  5. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Kat, the only comparison I can come up with is the low fat cheese from the store. It doesn't seem to melt as well as the full fat cheese. Maybe adding a little more cream to the milk and not pressing it as long will give you a moister cheese that will melt better. Just a guess.
     
  6. Whisperwindkat

    Whisperwindkat Well-Known Member

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    thanks Linn. My goats are nubians, and their milk is really creamy although it might not be creamy enough. I just might try adding more cream to the milk and seeing how that does. How much do you think I should add to get the fat content up more? Thanks for your help, Kat
     
  7. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't really know, maybe a couple of ounces per gallon. I guess you could experiment to see how much difference it makes. Maybe someone else might have an idea. Any suggestions?
     
  8. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

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  9. Otter

    Otter Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't make cheese, just read here to learn, but I do know that sometimes I freeze cheese to get it to melt better later (when you freeze it, it gets all crumbly) and for mac and cheese I make a cheese sauce if I'm doing it with hard cheeses.

    I melt a spoonful of butter and cook a big, heaping spoonful of flour in it, then I mix in a half-cup of milk, stir well and slowly mix in my grate/shredded cheeses, stirring the whole time. Then I pour the whole thick (sometimes gloppy) cheese sauce over the cooked macaroni and just pop it in the oven to brown on top.

    That might help you without changing your recipe.
     
  10. highlandview

    highlandview Well-Known Member

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    I had the same problem with some store bought (not low fat cheese) recently. I thought the cheese was overly dry or stale - if cheese can be stale.