Whole wheat flours

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by longshadowfarms, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    King Arthur brand has a flour they call "white wheat flour" which they say is 100% whole grain ground from a different kind of wheat than normal whole wheat flour is ground from (a red wheat). Our local mill sells something called Graham flour which is supposedly similar. Has anyone ever heard of Graham flour? Do you know if it is 100% whole grain? Does it sound like what King Arthur calls "white wheat flour"? Our local mill's flour runs $7.25 for 50 lbs through our coop as opposed to the $1.79 for 5 lbs of King Arthur.
     
  2. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whole 'white 'wheat flour will not be the same as Graham flour. Graham flour is a bit sweeter and coarser than reg whole wheat. It is also darker and richer looking than whole wheat. My research says that the whole white wheat is sweeter tasteing than reg whole wheat, perhaps that is the similarity. But I don't think the finished product will look the same. Graham is just denser in texture. It also spoils/goes rancid faster since all the germ, bran, and endosperm are used. I haven't bought it in a long time, since we seldom eat bread or crackers now.
    Someone else surely knows more about this than I do, but maybe it was some help.


    Halo
     

  3. miclew

    miclew Well-Known Member

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    That are NOT the same. Graham flour is a coarsely milled whole wheat. White wheat is a different strain of wheat. It is supposed to have all the nutrtion of reg whole wheat but lighter in color and not as bitter. I haven't tried it. I don't use graham flour for my regular baking because it will make the loaves too dense. I use King Arthur regular whole wheat which is very finely milled.

    michele
     
  4. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    ****
    I saw that in Wally World the other day and wasn't sure what to make of it. So I bought the whole wheat flour and used the recipe on the back. The bread was nice and moist and had a really good flavor. My kids inhaled it LOL

    I paid $2.08 for a 5 lb bag.
     
  5. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I was told by someone else who buys from that mill that the Graham flour is yellow and very fine. They said it was best for cookies, biscuits etc. I couldn't find anything in my Rodale's natural food cookbook or a whole grain cookbook I had. I surfed the web later last night and found basically what the poster said about the Graham flour being coarser and having more of the germ in it. Something I read said something about the Joy of Cooking cookbook so I looked in there and it said that it was a more finely ground flour with the added germ. Guess I'm as confused as ever now. I may just try it and see how it is. My kids like the coarse, heavy bread anyway so if it is coarse, I'll use it for bread. If it is fine, I'll try it in all sorts of stuff since everything I've read says that it is more nutritious and has more fiber. Thanks for the responses!
     
  6. Snugglebunny

    Snugglebunny Well-Known Member

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    I buy the King Arthur White Wheat on a regular basis. It's the only way (so far) that I can get my hubby & kids to eat any wheat, and only if I hide it in cookies or something. King Arthur is one of my favorite things.
     
  7. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    I went on the King Arthur website and this flour sounds like a dream come true! I feel so guilty baking with white flour but we just don't like the taste of the whole wheat.
    Please report back if you try it! (I called my local store and they don't carry it, but I asked them to get some.)

    Thanks for this thread!
     
  8. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I have used the King Arthur white wheat for a while. The question was whether or not the Graham flour is similar (I don't think so now) because the price is a lot better. $2.08 a bag is even worse than what I pay! Wonder if I'm thinking of a sale price. Anyway, the King Arthur white wheat flour is not just like white. It is MUCH lighter and holds moisture a lot better than regular wheat flour. I'd say the taste and texture are about mid-way between white and wheat. You could try mixing the King Arthur white wheat with white flour for a while to start to convert them, slowly increasing the amount of white wheat until they get used to it. Cornell has a formula for improving the nutritional value of white flour. It isn't as good as whole grain but it might be a good start as you get them used to whole grains. The Cornell forumula is as follows:
    For each cup of white flour you are using in your recipe, put into the bottom of the measuring cup 1 Tbsp soy flour, 1 Tbsp dry milk solids and 1 tsp wheat germ. Then fill the remainder of the cup with the unbleached flour. Mix before using.
    Good luck! Guess I'm pretty blessed that my kids really like the whole grain foods!
     
  9. boren

    boren Well-Known Member

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    There are many kinds of wheat. Here's a grossly simplified form:

    Flour used for bread is normally hard red wheat. It's high in protein hence forms good gluten to help bread rise. If you hold the grain (*** do people call is berries, it's grain!?! It's a kernel of corn, no a corn berry) in your hands it will be a dense red/brown grain with a smooth exterior. When you grind it the outside brown layer form the bran in the flower. Since it's a red/brown colour it makes the flour a redish colour. It also imparts of abit of bitterness. People are used to this being whole wheat flour.

    Normally in commercial flour the germ is removed so it adds little colour. The germ contains oils and spoils fairly quickly.

    On the other side of the scale there's soft white wheat. The grains are golden in colour with a puffy look to them. The grains are more puffy than hard red, they almost look bloated. They aren't good for bread, but work well in pies, cakes, etc where you don't need such a high level of gluten.

    Within the last 10 years there's been an increase in growing hard white wheat. This probably has to do with the increase in available strains, and the preference many consumers have shown for it. The grain has the same light golden bran as the soft white, and it doesn't have the bitterness that the hard red brings with it. A pdf describing hard white in more detail is here:

    http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/library/grsci2/mf1111.pdf

    The flour you are buying in going to be a combination of soft and hard white flour to produce a consistent protein content.

    Graham flour I can't find much information about what type of wheat is used to make it. It's a coarse grind whole wheat flour, and that's about all I know about it. Since it's more coarsly ground you can't expect to use it as a direct replacement.

    I buy wheat in 50lb bags for the outrageous price of $15. (I used to pay $5) If you're buying a lot of those little 1lb bags you might want to consider grinding your own. Plus you would get the wheat germ which is good for you.
     
  10. Timedess

    Timedess Guest

    noone has mentioned so far, I don't think, that if you do buy large bags of already-ground whole wheat flour (with the germ in it), you can freeze it in smaller bags to extend it's 'shelf life'.

    i use the prairie gold (also called golden 86) wheat to grind (well i did until my grain mill got dropped; i need another one). it is the 'hard white wheat' that has been mentioned already and i wouldn't buy anything else (to grind.)
     
  11. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know what you are calling "white wheat flour" so I may be way off base.. I used to work as a grain miller in a flour mill for a few years. Whole wheat flour is yellowish in color, because of the bran and germ, if it is white whole wheat flour I would guess it has been bleached with chlorine or novadelox(just another chemical), these are things that we used. If you ever buy Rag-a-muffins from Washington bakeries you have used this flour. Hope this helps.
     
  12. R.

    R. Well-Known Member

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  13. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    THANK YOU, R.! Excellent website and I have a distributor near enough to get to occasionally. Think I'll give it a try next time I get over that way.

    As for storage, flour should be ok for a year if stored in a cool, dry place away from rodents and bugs. I go through about 25 lb a month so it isn't a huge issue but I do keep it in a 50 gal metal drum in our basement which is cool and dry. Freezer space is at a premium here so I can't even imagine trying to store it there! Looked again at the price and my last purchase must have been on sale! The King Arthur wheats were about $3 for 5 lb :eek: