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I'm on lifetime homesteading project number 5, all in Indiana and Michigan.
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This is from a news segment from Fox 5 News in San Diego. The quote is from a local large-scale egg producer. What does he mean? The link is below.

"Hilliker says the ranch sets aside a lot of eggs to sell directly to the community and they try to keep prices fair and consistent, even when it gets tough. The other side of the business involves wholesale.

“The egg market is all controlled by supply and demand. The government sends out a price every week and we follow it,” Hilliker said.

"It’s a large factor for why we are seeing prices soar."

HUH? Can someone explain what he means?

 

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A niece in the Phoenix area says they are paying $13 a dozen
 
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The singular reason that eggs are increasing in price far faster than virtually any other food product is because of a sustaining bout of the avian flu.

The avian flu has severely impacted egg yields nationwide. Farmers continue to lose tremendous amounts of their poultry flocks, and this is having a direct impact on the number of eggs they can ship out. According to the USDA, approximately 60 million birds have succumbed to the avian flu to date.

There simply is not enough supply to meet demand, thus driving egg prices to heights unseen.
 

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I have a good friend that has a egg producing farm. He has 9 houses 650 ft long. His dad did the same as he was growing up. Theyre really struggling because they are not getting any more for eggs now than they did 3 years ago but their feed costs have gone up around 37 percent. So in effect they are making 37 percent less now than they did when eggs could be had for 1.50 a dozen. Its all a scam just like when the lumber companies were losing money then suddenly a supposed shortage and theyre raking in billions in profit.
 

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I'm getting about 8-9 dozen a week and raised my prices 50% a few weeks ago but, for some reason, I still am losing money on them. We use about 1 dozen a week and the rest are given to 1 neighbor, 2 relatives, and 4 friends. I never was good at math, but I think my business model sucks.
 

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“The egg market is all controlled by supply and demand. The government sends out a price every week and we follow it,” Hilliker said.
Its a contradiction. If the government sets a price, then its not a function of supply and demand. The whole statement sounds like Orwellian double-talk.
 

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I'm getting about 8-9 dozen a week and raised my prices 50% a few weeks ago but, for some reason, I still am losing money on them. We use about 1 dozen a week and the rest are given to 1 neighbor, 2 relatives, and 4 friends. I never was good at math, but I think my business model sucks.
Gos along with chicken math. Funny how neighbors and friends want free or cheap eggs when the feed is high or the store price is high. When eggs are .99 at the store they will buy them not your 2.00 ones.
 

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A niece in the Phoenix area says they are paying $13 a dozen
That is insane. We have around 30 chickens and we sell to our friends and neighbors for $2 a dozen. $13 per dozen is Ludacris.
 
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What does he mean?

“The egg market is all controlled by supply and demand. The government sends out a price every week and we follow it,” Hilliker said.

HUH? Can someone explain what he means?
He means exactly what he said only he didn't say it well. It's the supply and demand market (the producers) that sets the prices, not the government. The USDA keeps track of the current market prices and sends a list every week to the producers to let them know what is happening. The USDA doesn't set the prices, it only shows them what the prices are in the market. Then it's up to the producers to set their prices accordingly, as the producers choose to do. It's the same system in all countries. Maybe this will explain it better for you:

Chapter 5 - Pricing and sales policy.

.
 

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“The egg market is all controlled by supply and demand. The government sends out a price every week and we follow it,” Hilliker said.
HUH? Can someone explain what he means?
I think it means the quality of journalism sucks.
Since those two statements run contradictory to each other, either the reporter misquoted the source or the reporter never did their job to clarify the contradiction.

However, your fundamental question stands. Are the price of eggs price controlled? Or are the price of eggs determined by market forces (supply & demand)?
 

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I'm getting about 8-9 dozen a week and raised my prices 50% a few weeks ago but, for some reason, I still am losing money on them. We use about 1 dozen a week and the rest are given to 1 neighbor, 2 relatives, and 4 friends. I never was good at math, but I think my business model sucks.
That's okay.

My business model sucks, too, but I know that people who need eggs are getting them.
 

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around here the seller sets the price not an agency of the government

now the price WIC (Women Infants and children) is willing to pay for eggs would be set by the Gov so they may use the WIC max amount as the highest they will put the cheapest eggs
what S.N.A.P or similar programs may also set a max reimbursement and because they invested in certain producers or have contracts with them or those producers get farm substadies based on WIC or other food substaties get

everyone wants a THEM to blame and the GOV is typically a good one to blame but the reality is if the Gov set the price of every private commodity then it would be time to UN-elect everyone in every state house who wasn't speaking out against it and start over.
 

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Egg futures contracts used to be traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (I was a "runner" there a long time ago when it was live trading). I'm not sure where they are traded now electronically but this is one way prices are set by (large) buyers and sellers in the market place. Locally, prices are set/determined at the weekly auction. They auction produce and eggs in the morning before cattle and hay are auctioned.
 

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I haven't boughten an egg, or a chicken, or chicken feed in 12 years. My costs are zero, I keep what we need, I give several dozen eggs a week to local folks that need them, granddaughter sells a bunch at the farm stand.
 

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I'm on lifetime homesteading project number 5, all in Indiana and Michigan.
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I haven't boughten an egg, or a chicken, or chicken feed in 12 years. My costs are zero, I keep what we need, I give several dozen eggs a week to local folks that need them, granddaughter sells a bunch at the farm stand.
Interesting. What do they eat?
 

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Posted 1/12/23 6:22 PM CST

i have no idea of who sets the prices of eggs. The broadcast news wide eye lament millions of chickens succumb to bird flu and prices of eggs are up 60%. At the same time the business section of the paper says the large egg suppliers with a few million laying hens only lost 5 to 10 percent of their flocks and were prepared for it and began restocking flocks as soon as possible yet egg prices have jumped 150% to 200% at retailers.
 
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