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I am in the UK - people's main concerns at the moment are financial I guess (not much difference there) What do people think of the US? Hard to say and I am going to take some time to get my thoughts in iorder before I answer that :)

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I do :) I just don't post often because I have a very busy life, no time for writing long posts or replying to threads often. I just quickly scan whatever is being talked about & then move on.
I often want to write more but then something gets in the way & before I know it the thread I was going to reply to is 3 weeks old...

Just like Hoggie I would have to think about what to write.
Giving an honest opinion about what people in my country think of Americans requires lots of tact and explainations, I guess.

My husband (American, living here) usually tells people he's Canadian.

Saves him a lot of hassle and aggravation. Dutch people have no 'politeness'-filter between their brain and their mouths, and what they percieve as a honest and straightforward comment can be considered as a very rude remark by the person recieving their 'honest opinion'.
And, yeah, their opinion on Americans is usually very honest. *sigh*
I wasn't aware of this untill I married one... I frequently get lectured on the evils of fundamentalist Americans by random people (and republicans are seen as fundamentalists, in the way as some republicans view all muslims as fundamentalists... Just the other side of the coin).
A lot of people view Americans as the global terrorists and bullies, using up all the wealth and giving nothing in return.

And for the record, above is not MY opinion, but opinions I encounter in my daily life when people find out I'm married to an American.
Have to say that as a whole, I'm not too thrilled with the USA as well, but the individual Americans I know are all wonderful people. Your nature and wildlife is very beautiful too.

Anyway, the Dutch don't like this generation of Americans, no. Bush did a lot of damage in terms of international relations. When I'm not so sleepy and if you are genuinly interested in the reasons why then I'll try to explain more.
There is always a background and a context as to why people feel the way they feel, but I'll only write it down if you are truly interested, since I don't want to spend a lot of my precious time writing a long post only to be bashed by people on here who can only see CRITISISM of their beloved country and think it's my personal opinion instead of just an explaination.

Because the above has happened to me before.
 

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Thank you Kitty-cat. I might not like to hear what you say but I want to hear your thoughts.
My 2 DD's have traveled abroad twice in their young lives and oldest DD is getting ready to study abroad this spring in England. I think it will be wonderful for her to see America from far off looking in. At 18 she is very conservative and I wonder if the experience will change her.
Thanks again.
 

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Just curious about our out-of-country posters. Tell us a little about your area. What are the main concerns in your country at this time? What do most people there think about Americans?
I read here daily but don't post too often any more. I'm a Canadian engaged to be married to an American that I met through this forum. I live in the south-west coastal corner of BC. It's very beautiful and lush, has a temperate climate with lots of agriculture and the citizenry here is represented by people from many nations so we celebrate a lot of multi-cultural festivals here year-round.

I'd say the main concerns in this area are the economy, just like everywhere else in the world right now. Also, people here are gearing up getting prepared for the Winter Olympics in 2010 and the influx of people and global attention that will be bringing to the province that winter, so that's kind of fun and exciting.

Regarding your last question - as has already been mentioned, a thorough explanation would require a lot of tact and diplomacy. Being honest in a nutshell though...... so please don't kill the messenger ...... most people here (and remember that's people from many nations here) think that most Americans are condescending and oppressive towards non-Americans and don't really care or know or even want to know much about the rest of the world. I think I'll just leave it at that. :shrug:

Now can I please ask you a question Melissa? I know that you are a very caring and sincere person so I would like to ask why did you ask that last question about what other people think about Americans?

I'm not trying to be offensive but I think if you had not asked that last question you might have gotten a lot more responses to the other questions from many more non-Americans on this board. I guess that remains to be seen.
 

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I think most of the world would agree with kitty-kat. Most do not think to much of us as a country, but when they meet americans as individuals they like them. Many dislike America, but like Americans if that makes since. I travel out of the country quite a bit and I have had the pleasure of meeting people from all over the world, and my rules are simple, don't talk about politics and religion and I can get along with anyone from anywhere. Sorry, I know this thread is for non-us citizens, but I think it is a great thread, very interesting topic!
 

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I live just north of Toronto, Ontario. It's a beautiful, hilly, green country with lots of forest and farms. We get four distinct seasons here which I love, I enjoy each season for what it is and they are all fine if you prepare and dress for them. Winter really makes you appreciate summer and likewise the other way around.

I think the big concern here is the economy although our finances in this country are far better then the US. Our banking system is different and more stable and I believe Canadians as a whole have less debt per person then Americans. Obviously the US economy has a major effect on ours but we are far more stable here financially.

As for what people here think about Americans, lets just say that Barak Obama has a lot to do in rebuilding the image of the USA. As much as many Americans seem to think that Canadians live in igloos and drive dog sleds to work, many Canadians think of Larry the Cable Guy as your average American. I drove the States for a few months in a tractor trailer and most of the people I met were no different than I was, just your average joe trying to make a living.
 

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My dh is not American. In fact he is from a secular Muslim country that is a parliamentary democracy. I've lived abroad much of my adult life in several different countries, and it was not through the military (so the opinions I hear are from regular citizens). Most of the rest of the world has similar concerns to ours. The economy is foremost on people's minds. My in-laws in Turkey are not as concerned about the economy right now as friends in Germany, UK, France, UAE (expats, that is), and Denmark because they just came out of a period of hyperinflation and their economy is better than ever. I know you asked what non-Americans think of America and while I'm American, my in-laws are not and most of my friends are not and I *know* what a lot of the rest of the world thinks of America because they are more than happy to tell me. Note that these are all people who do not live in North American or Latin American. This is what I hear from people across the ocean. Americans as a whole are not well-liked just about any place you go in these parts of the world. I will put it this way... when we are abroad (which is frequently for visits and regularly for living abroad) and we have to speak English (i.e. we're in a country where we don't speak the language), I have dh speak because I don't want to give myself away as an American. Dh speaks English with a very heavy accent and I speak with a Midwest American accent. I almost always try to hide the fact that I'm an American when I'm abroad because there isn't a high opinion of Americans. I often get an earful when people find out I'm American. They see us as imperialists, unsophisticated, uneducated (they think our education system is inferior, which I would agree on), and as a previous poster suggested, they believe we are all right-wing extremists. (Don't shoot the messenger, I'm just restating what I have personally be told by non-Americans). Occasionally, I get "compliments" when abroad... I'm told, "Oh, I would have thought you were Canadian."

When Obama won the election, we were getting phone calls and emails from friends around the world congratulating us. They think that we finally have made a good political decision. One friend told dh that he felt embarrassed for America that we voted Bush into office not once, but twice and they can't understand voting for someone so lacking intelligence and foreign relations. They think that we have finally voted in someone who is really, really smart and will surround himself with smart advisers, of whom he is not afraid to ask advice. He is respected abroad.

I'm not trying to turn this into GC. This is actual information I have gotten abroad from non-Americans. I'm sure those non-Americans who have responded or are reading this are nodding their heads and saying, "Yep, exactly!"
 

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I live in Vancouver, which according to global polls is now considered the most desirable place in the world to live. I don't know if this the kind of thing you want to know. I'm Canadian married 30 years to an American citizen with landed immigrant status since he was a teenager. His parents were both university professors who brought their family of 3 young teenage boys here in the early 60's (during the Viet Nam War) so they wouldn't be drafted into military service when they came of age. They've all achieved successful, happy lives here.

I travelled south with my husband during the late 70's and met all their other American relatives still living in California and they all are very nice people. But they didn't know much about Canada and they had a lot of misconceptions about Canadian politics and our way of life so they didn't want to come up here to visit us. Their kids thought that we are British subjects ??? AND communists ??? who all live a life of hardships, that it snowed here most of the year, even in the summer, and that we had to import ALL our food from the USA because of the cold and that we didn't have paved roads and drove on the left side of the road and that the majority of us speak French. So I kind of got the impression that American kids didn't learn as much about Canada compared to what Canadian kids learned about America. I hope the worst of their misconceptions have changed over the past 30 years. :D
 

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Mostly I lurk, and occassionaly post, because I have a lot to learn from all of you, regardless of country. My perspective is (again) a little different since I am a Canadian, but a first generation immigrant from the US. My parents also come north in the 60s, not to avoid the draft, but for work. I have a large, extended American family on both coasts and in between. Most people I know here are very concerned about the local and world wide economy. If pressed, intelligent people would express that Americans are pretty much likeus (living fairly close to teh border helps understanding on both sides. That being said, I don't know many fans of Bush and I do notice an upswing of interest and hope with the new President. There's been lots of talk about a "new day". I'll admit now that it's over that I voted Democrat myself (registered in N Carolina), but I'm heding my bets as the Democrats tend to be protectionist. I guess what I'm saying is that most Canadians have only a superficial understanding of the US, and it's easy to fall in to beleiving stereotypes (ie. loud, conservative), but deep down, people are people wherever they live.
 

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Hi, another Canadian here. I live in Nova Scotia. I am in the country side of the Annapolis Valley which is a prime agriculural area. As the crow flies I am quite close to the Bay of Fundy which I find moderates the weather, when the tide is in in the summer were a little cooler than those who are more inland. We are a little more balmy than most of Canada excepting BC Coast and a green Christmas is always a possibility but we always get some snow by January.
I will try to separate US people from US politics...My husband and I have many business dealings with Americans and many other countries and on the whole we find most people to be much like us but maybe the Americans are a little more uninformed. I find that your media sources tend to keep it that way. We get a lot of US based news here, and it's difficult to get full stories if thats all you watch.
Anyway I just have to post a link to a Rick Mercer video... He's a popular Canadian Comedian who does a whole thing on "Talking with Americans" This one is really old but I still giggle. And yes I know he does lead them down the garden path a bit.
[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seYUbVa7L7w&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seYUbVa7L7w&feature=related[/ame]
 

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I read here daily but don't post too often any more. I'm a Canadian engaged to be married to an American that I met through this forum. I live in the south-west coastal corner of BC. It's very beautiful and lush, has a temperate climate with lots of agriculture and the citizenry here is represented by people from many nations so we celebrate a lot of multi-cultural festivals here year-round.

I'd say the main concerns in this area are the economy, just like everywhere else in the world right now. Also, people here are gearing up getting prepared for the Winter Olympics in 2010 and the influx of people and global attention that will be bringing to the province that winter, so that's kind of fun and exciting.

Regarding your last question - as has already been mentioned, a thorough explanation would require a lot of tact and diplomacy. Being honest in a nutshell though...... so please don't kill the messenger ...... most people here (and remember that's people from many nations here) think that most Americans are condescending and oppressive towards non-Americans and don't really care or know or even want to know much about the rest of the world. I think I'll just leave it at that. :shrug:

Now can I please ask you a question Melissa? I know that you are a very caring and sincere person so I would like to ask why did you ask that last question about what other people think about Americans?

I'm not trying to be offensive but I think if you had not asked that last question you might have gotten a lot more responses to the other questions from many more non-Americans on this board. I guess that remains to be seen.
No one has to answer all parts of the post. You can answer any portion you wish.

I don't know exactly why I asked it that way, the thought just popped into my mind as I was thinking about some recent events here in the US like the economic trials. I kind of have the thought that many people in the US are a bit spoiled and was thinking about people around the world and that most of them seem to thrive using much less resources than we do. We could learn from that I think.
 

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I kind of have the thought that many people in the US are a bit spoiled and was thinking about people around the world and that most of them seem to thrive using much less resources than we do
Before you start thinking you live the high sophisticated life compared to us, suffice it to say that we Canadians are just as spoiled, wasteful, and self-absorbed as Americans. However, I advise every American who "thinks" they know how Canadians live, to come up here and visit. You will be sadly disappointed in that our cities and small towns are pretty much identical to yours. No seals, no igloos, no eskimos---unless you're talking WAY WAY up north, and that is NOT most of Canada. If you've been to the Washington or New York state, that pretty much sums up what most of Canada is like. :D
 

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So I kind of got the impression that American kids didn't learn as much about Canada compared to what Canadian kids learned about America. I hope the worst of their misconceptions have changed over the past 30 years. :D
I had friends from Canada when I was in college (sadly they moved on and I do not keep in touch with them anymore), and one of the first things they brought up in our different-countries discussion was how little Americans are taught about Canada, and they were so very right. I don't know if that has really changed much, unfortunately.

I do understand why Melissa posted the last question, though. I often wonder the same thing, and I'm truly interested to hear the truth, even if it seems harsh. If it makes you all feel any better, I rarely have the inclination to shoot the messenger!
 

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No one has to answer all parts of the post. You can answer any portion you wish.

I don't know exactly why I asked it that way, the thought just popped into my mind as I was thinking about some recent events here in the US like the economic trials. I kind of have the thought that many people in the US are a bit spoiled and was thinking about people around the world and that most of them seem to thrive using much less resources than we do. We could learn from that I think.
Thanks Melissa. :)
 

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It would be all worth your while to google Canada and all the different provinces just to see what kind of place this is.
I live in beautiful east central "sunny" Alberta in an area called Kalyna country, which is mostly a mixed farming area, 10 miles from the nearest town. Lots of world famous AAA grain fed beef, and thousands of miles of clean pure air here!! To the west is our capital city, Edmonton, and to the north is Fort MacMurray (capital of Newfoundland...lol),one of the biggest oil deposits in North America.....which by the way, most of the oil companies here are from the U.S. so don't yap about our "dirty oil" if you don't know which country is doing the polluting - a very sore spot with me with Bush and the protesters that are ignorant of the facts.
Our region ranges from the rockies to muskeg, and pine and spruce forests, to prairie, badlands and desert, and lakeland. We don't get hurricanes here, and only a few tornados. We have few garden pests, and no cockroaches or rats!!! and only some rattlesnakes in the southern badlands and desert area. We don't get much snow here in this area, for years not enough for snowmobiling even, but our temperatures will dip to 40 below at least for a few days every winter. Summers rarely get to 90 in the north half, and the humidity is low, so they are quite enjoyable..... and most important -very low population. I can go 1 mile north of my place and be in uninhabited bush for 50 miles. An average 3 bedroom, 2 bath house sells for over $300,000.00 here-I didn't add too many zeros. We do have satellite for tv, and high speed internet, and all the modern asian technology like ipods and bluetooth.....
Our biggest concern here has to do with the free trade agreement, and the BSE and COOL, and the general backlash from your failing economy in regards to our export prices and our own economy.
It is common to hear about Americans using/wearing Canadian flags when they are travelling abroad, and I feel sorry for you all that are scared to show your true identity in other countries. I know most of you are just the same as us, but lacking knowledge of Canada and generally being self centered -tho it's not your fault for your school and political systems. It seems like your politicians seem to keep important facts away from you, plus being arrogant, ignorant and condecending to other countries. Of course it's been listening to Bush and some of his remarks about Canada's resources that get my hackles up.....just because a river crosses into the states does not mean you own all the water in the river on our side of the border!! And of course this "dirty oil" business -the pollution is just a drop in the bucket compared to the pollution you guys have in most of your cities. We have had our share of idiots (eastern french) running our country too, but finally seem to have solid ones with a Prime Minister from the west, and a local Ukrainian farmer Premier. So hopefully Obama will be better, and improve the worlds image of the U.S. and improve relations with us and other countries.
 

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I live south west of Sanza and closer to the mountains so our climate is a bit more moderate in the sense that we get the odd reprive from the winter cold by way of chinooks. I think Alberta tends to be a lot more philosophical about our southern neighbors because we have a closer working relationship wiht the US by way of oil & gas and ag exports. I do agree that most Americans know less about us than we do about them but quite a few seem conditioned to believe that we're all about clubbing baby seals, decriminalized pot and gay marriage because that's about all the Canadian news reported in the US but we get a lot of US news up here.

I do think that our greatest concern right now is the economy and the sinking stock market. Both have a direct effect on our existence. I think many Canadians are watching what Obama does next because he was pretty loud about eliminating NAFTA and that would certainly impact certain sectors of the Canadian economy.
 
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