who has a metal lathe and/or a mill?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by tallpaul, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. tallpaul

    tallpaul Well-Known Member

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    What kind and what do you use them for. What are your favorite projects. Myself I always have wanted them and "fell into" some nice equipment in the last two weeks.
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    TP, I have both. The mill I have is a small bridgeport and the lathe is an antique engine lathe. The mill is used more frequently, mainly as a precision drill press. I do have a full set of collets and a decent supply of end mills. I use the mill to repair farm equipment and seldom make anything from scratch. I did recently make an adapter to connect a splined shaft high pressure pump to fit up to a PTO shaft so that the pump could be driven by the tractor. Recently I reworked a trigger for a crossbow for the neighbor and had to mill some stock off the mechanism after it was brazed. I use the old lathe to straighten shafts or to chase threads that are buggered. I really would like to have a hydraulic iron worker and a full set of punches and the ability to shear angle iron. I have a DC welder and most hand tools. The most used tool I have is a portaband bandsaw.
     

  3. tallpaul

    tallpaul Well-Known Member

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    Agmantoo Myself I always have wanted them and "fell into" some nice equipment in the last two weeks. A friend of a friend died and the kids blew out the tools. The big stuff went unbelievably cheap. Two georgeous BIG south bends and two big mills
    went for 300-600 each. My friend bought one big lathe and both mills. I was helpin him unload the truck and was kinda whinin that I had been lookin and I have been for a while. He mentioned there wass till a small lathe and smaller mill in the basement. We went to move his stuff and I checked out the basement shop. THere was a craftsman/atlas 12"/24 lathe with a BUNCH of tooling and extras with the bench etc. The guy said 500-600 and I said I'd do the 500... the mill was not anything I knew about at the time and I was a bit disappointed. It was an old horizontal mill. It was clean but I was expectin a smaller benchtop vertical but the guy asked if I was interested and I asked how much? He said 100.00.. I asked if the tooling came with it and he said yes... so whats a guy gonna do? I came to find out that the mill which is a burke #4 BTW is a good unit and the horizontal is actually better at quite a few common mill jobs for a hobbiest. So as we were looking around/moving my stuff and my friends big stuff I also aquired a few other tools... There was a cut off type band saw - I asked how much? 20.00 was the answer so... there were two drill presses in the basement shop... same thing how much? 25.00 each- with tooling so they came home. One is a modern type and decent. I figured the chuck alone was worth it... the other was a bigger ugly desktop unit with belts etc and I was not really wantin it but the tooling and to get it out of there for them etc I took it too. It was a sleeper! It is a sensitive drilling machine. I find out they were/are used to drill precision small diamiter holes- Then there was the big ole hydraulic press... not the bar type but this one has big threaded rods and some real iron plates... its pretty robust. for 50.00 ya just don't say no... then there was a file cabinet. The card type with two trays per draw and several drawers in the unit. I asked and he said 5.00 empty. It would be ieal for the tooling for the lathe/mill so I wanted it. he starts cleaning it out and there ended up being hammers and pullers and some other tools in there too. He asked me for 25.00 for the tools and the cabinet- I mean how do ya say no? So it seems that I now have that basic metal shop I always have wanted... I have had welders arc/mig and torches and a plasma cutter for a while no and use them more than I ever thought I would. Now I need to figure out what tooling I actually have now. I am remodeling a room in the garage that used to be a house behind mine at one time. I had finished the main room with insulation and drywall years ago and this other room was broken up by tile walls for a shower stall and a wide interior tile/block wall that was nothin but a waste of space. I am not sure why they did it the way they did but since its not load bearing it is coming down too. I will end up with a nice 12 by twelve area minus a small water closet it should be big enough for all the machine tools and I will climate control it. I am pretty pumped and I have been wantin to do somethin with that area for a long while now- besides filling it with projects/junk!
    I figure there will be alot of use for repairs as you stated and do but I really want to play a bit more eventually. Maybe even get some cnc stuff down the road. Then again Like I really need another hobby ;)
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    TP, are you new power machines single or three phase? I am envious of all the "new" tools and particularly at the give away prices!
     
  5. tallpaul

    tallpaul Well-Known Member

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    Agmantoo- mine are the single phase 110... the neighbor got the three phase (bigger) machines WITH a converter... I have been looking for a long time. I know where a bridgeport is/was sitting in pieces that a guys dad took apart as alzheimers set in. I need to get ahold of him and see if its still there and available. I was afraid of it but since the bigger stuff goes cheap sometimes It may be worth looking at. The best thing to me is my stuff short of the cut off bandsaw are all AMERICAN IRON! That makes me happy!
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    TP, I know a Rube Goldberg method of running 3 phase equipment off single phase. I was going to share the info with you if you needed same.
     
  7. tallpaul

    tallpaul Well-Known Member

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    thank you- I get a little funny with ethnic engineering when it comes to electric.... makes me nervous- well that and "rigging" gas lines :)
     
  8. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    what do you do run it off of multiple circuits tied into one line?
     
  9. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a bridgport mill and two lathes, one 13" x 40" Senca, and one that will swing 24" and 7' bed, (it is close to 125 years old) and old Lincon lathe which later became Pratt and Wittney machine, (not the engine company),
    I repair things, mill out things, have made engine transmisson plate adaptors, and other transmisson adaptors, it jsut depends on what the need is,
     
  10. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    A 3 phase rotary inverter is simply the two 120 volt legs of a 240 volt circuit, going to, and running a generator to produce the high leg for the third phase, and then going on to supply the two 120 volt legs.

    120 Volts_________________________________________________120 volts
    + !
    + high leg ! Generator ____________ 167 volts
    + !
    120 volts_________________________________________________ 120 volts

    Well it didn't come out like I tried to draw it, but you should get the idea from it.
     
  11. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As stated basically a rotary phase converter is a 3 phase motor that is running on single phase and in the process generating a third phase,

    there are three easy ways to get a ROTARY three phase converter,

    first buy a commercial one, all pre made, with capacitors and all, just hook it up,

    the second is to use a STATIC phase converter, and use that to start the converter motor and let it take over,
    a static phase converter is a group of capacitors that when engaged electronically shift the phase of the third leg to get the three phase motor to rotate, and after a pre set time it kicks out and let the motor run on two of the three phases making the third phase in the process,
    (there are plans and information on the net and in books on how to make a static converter),

    the third that I know of is to use a small sub hp motor (1/4hp to 1/3hp) to rotate the larger three phase motor and then kick in the power to the three phase motor after it is rotating up to speed and then kick out the smaller HP motor and let the "3 phase converter" provide power to the machine or machines,

    I have used both static converters, and I have used rotary converters, (the rotary are better)

    the rotary will provide truer three phase,
    the static will run the three phase motors on two of the three windings but the motor has to be rotating first, and that is what the static converter does it works as and uses the third winding of the three phase motor as a starter winding. (regardless if it is a motor being used as a converter or one of the motors on a machine),

    many of your applications you can use a static converter just fine, (if it starts with out load and if you ar over powered and can live with only 2/3 of the power of the motor),
    but if it starts under load (air compressor) you will need a rotary converter to be able to give as full of power to it as one can possibly give, (the converter has to be up and running to properly supply the heavy load),
    that can be accomplished in one of two ways depending on your situation, leave the converter on during the time your using the machine, or using a stepped timed starter, that will start the rotary converter first and then say 10 seconds later start the motor on the load, (this is one method to run 3 phase refrigeration compressors on single phase)

    (if you really wanted to you could use a static converter to say start your largest motor)
    say the lathe and then use that motor to become the converter for the other tools, you would have to let your lathe run all the time your using the other tools,

    on ebay there is a guy that sell plans for rotary converter, that uses a small hp motor to start, Lindsey publications sell information on how to make static and well as rotary.
    but a good inter net search may turn up about the same information for free,
     
  12. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    lost the post try again,

    converter using a pony motor,

    http://www.team.net/www/shop-talk/hm3phase.html

    self starting or static, good information

    http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/ph-conv/ph-conv.html

    should use a motor that is about the same size as your largest motor wanting to run, but once it is started you should be able to run up to about 3 times the HP, if the other motors are started separately, as the other running motors act as converters as well,

    one more thing when wiring your tools into the circuit, mark the manufactured leg, and do not hook any of the starter control component's, (transformers and or coils) to the manufactured leg of the 3 phase, as it probably will not not have the same voltage to ground as the grid produced power, and the steadiness of the power will not be the same as the grid produced.