Who are We?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Obser, May 13, 2006.

What best describes your present "degree" of homesteading?

  1. Current homesteader (homesteading is a way of life – self-sufficiency is important or dominant)

  2. Homestead resident (most needs met by outside income or savings – somewhat self-sufficient)

  3. Rural resident (live in rural area with little self-sufficiency or homesteader lifestyle)

  4. Future homesteader (concrete steps already taken)

  5. Possible homesteader (like the idea and have plan to homestead later)

  6. Wishful homesteader (like the idea but no real plans)

  7. Urban / suburban homesteader (live in town with some self-sufficiency)

  8. Former homesteader (now doing something else)

  9. Special case (?? Can you explain?)

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    As we read the threads it becomes obvious that varying degrees of “homesteading” are represented – from experienced, current homesteaders to those who are just beginning to consider the idea to those who were homesteaders but are no longer – with countless gradations between.

    The poll is not a test or a statement of what is “best”. It simply asks for a statement of fact.
     
  2. Spotted Crow

    Spotted Crow Well-Known Member

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    I'm a suburban person. I have two pet chickens of which one provides me with eggs and the other company...I like to grow my own veggies because prices are outrageous these days and these home grown items taste so much better. So I'm a wishy-washy homesteader... :shrug:
     

  3. ChickenMom

    ChickenMom Well-Known Member

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    We are sort of in the middle between the first and second option. We have an outside income but are working hard toward self sufficiency.
     
  4. MomOf4

    MomOf4 Well-Known Member

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    I agree with ChickenMom - I voted #2, but we are between 1 and 2...heading toward 1...
     
  5. Beltane

    Beltane Enjoying Four Seasons

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    Somewhere between 1 & 2 I guess. My DH works from home, and I work outside of the home at a non-profit. Although we grow our own veggies and have chickens, we 'purchase' our raw milk from a farmer up the road and utilize that to make our own cheese and butter. We have access to our own water well and we heat with wood. Although we are experiementing with solar power, we are still 'grid-tied.' I believe everyday we move closer and closer to being self-sufficient...that is our ultimate hope one day. :)
     
  6. Niki

    Niki mini-steader

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    I fit two categories, but only voted under one. I consider myself a "homestead resident" and a "future homesteader" with concrete plans. I suppose I could kinda fit the "suburban homesteader", too, in a way LOL Maybe I shoulda just voted "other" :shrug:

    Anyway, I live in a pretty small town - within "city" limits on just under an acre. When I bought my house a few years ago, I looked at houses out in the country, but as my children were relatively young, I wanted them to be able to walk to school or to friends' houses and stuff since I had to work through the week. It wasn't what I wanted, but it was affordable and fit what I felt my kids needed - and I guess me, too. Also, being a single mother, I was afraid of being in a remote location with me at work and the kids at home by themselves during the summer.

    I have plans to sell at some point, but not sure when exactly. My SO and I have plans to buy property together, but the "when" of that is still pending. So is the "what" as far as that goes. We have talked about buying a farm so he can get back into beef cattle, we have talked about mountain property and building a little cabin, we have talked about living in Canada, we have talked about living up north during the summer and in the south during the winter and we have talked about just buying an RV and travelling.

    I have a feeling we will settle on the farm. That seems to be the topic that keeps re-occurring more than the others. So while there are "concrete" plans to do "something", that's as far as we have gotten at this point. Moving beyond this point will depend on when he is offered the price he wants for his business.

    Currently I am in Ohio and he is in Florida, but we both have a passion for this way of life. He still uses his wringer washer and I can't wait to ship him some of my homemade laundry detergent!! :D He also raises chickens, has a vegetable garden, etc. He leads a very frugal life and is unbelievably self-sufficent for still being such a big part of the "grid".

    As for me, I am also frugal and am always looking for new ways to be self-sufficient, saving money or utilizing things that I or someone else would have normally thrown away.

    While my self-sufficiency or homesteading is still in its infancy, I think that a big part of homesteading is more of a mind-set. What I mean is that I have never been interested in climbing the corporate ladder. I am happiest when I am taking care of my family, cooking something spectacular or have my hands in the garden dirt. I don't care about having a new car. Mine works just fine. I don't care about making more money, I care more about living below my means and finding new ways to make the money I do have more valuable.

    I have so much more I want to learn, but no matter how much I learn, I don't think that I will ever be content that I know "enough". That's enough rambling. I think you get the drift ;)
     
  7. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    we are somewhere between "living rural" and "heading there" (not truly an option for the poll but wish it was.) I work and DH stays home with the goats (milk and future meat), chickens (eggs), garden (only at my insistance--he thinks he'll kill any plant he goes near) and we heat mostly with wood and want a solar water heater but need money to do it. I dragged my husband from the fancy Los Angeles coast to Nashville, then 45 minutes away from there to 6 acres in southeastern Williamson County, and if I could just raise these darn (human) kids, I'll drag him out somewhere even further away. They need school and with our pattern of interaction homeschooling is simply not an option for us...

    Just this "moderate" this lifestyle has raised everyone's eyebrows--heaven's, you'd think we were doing something illegal the way my mother reacted!

    Anyway, I'm glad I happened across this forum.

    Vanessa
     
  8. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Obser, you guys KNOW I'm between 1 and 2 right now. As soon as the mtg. is paid off I'll still be getting SS but will not have to work anymore. There's really no way to be 100% independent of some kind of outside income be it a 401K, SS, or personal investments, at least in my mind in this day and age. If the societal situations changes then so will the income change.
     
  9. Qwispea

    Qwispea Well-Known Member

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    I would be in the second choice..but it doesn't matter. I work for everything I own..and whether I grow all my own food..or purchase some of it from other growers..I'm self-sufficient. And nothing anybody can say will change that fact..no matter what!
     
  10. emulkahi1

    emulkahi1 Well-Known Member

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    Well Obser--I wavered between almost all of them. Finally chose 'wishful homesteader' since we currently live in town, with no concrete plans of going anywhere anytime soon. Though I do grow many of our veggies in the garden, and we hunt most of the meat we eat. So I guess that is somewhat self-sufficient--or at least w/in the food category. Of course, there is still a lot of food stuffs we do buy in the store. Try to do so in bulk when we can. Also, even though we live right in downtown Roundup, I seriously doubt it fits anyone's idea of 'urban'. So we don't really fit there either.

    *Sigh* LOL--that usually seems to be where we end up fitting in...Nowhere really. But everywhere kinda. Maybe that is a good way to be? Works for us I guess :shrug: :) ! Good poll!

    Erin
     
  11. Shadow

    Shadow Well-Known Member

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    We have been living on the farm for 21 years, growing most of our food but have income from a job up till I retired in 1998. We worked hard setting up a retirement income, some rental property and some owner financeed property. Sorry but we just did not want to live on a subsistence level. Sure you can live self sufficent untill sickness of some type or just one bad turn of luck. We planned carefully and so far its ok.
     
  12. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I've had to go with door number three...rural resident. Although I'm close to number two; dh just could care less. About the only thing we really do homesteady as a couple is eat the eggs my hens lay :p

    Of course, we've got the sheep and I do homesteady things with the wool, but at this point only one has ended up in the freezer. I think over the course of the next couple of years this will change (especially when I heard dh telling someone about the nais program...nearly fell off my feet!)
     
  13. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I voted with the majority as I have a job and buy many things with my earned income. I was closer to #1 when I had my business on my property. I am not working towards your number one choice as I don't see it as a feasible long term plan. As some one else said it will take a pension and or 401K and social security as you will need cash flow to maintain all of the listed lifestyles.
     
  14. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    You forget though that a lot of people in catagory 1 are doing it they are just being their own boss thru selling produce and or honey at farmers markets or they have a buissness they do out of their home and are their own boss.
     
  15. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I am a special case as you all know. I had a Homestead in the Marshall islands I built our home and turned a wedding gift of a pair of chickens into over 100 in a few years by using a top hatch incubator. Started with a few pigs and ended up with 15. Had lots of bananas papaya's and many more things. Two canoes and went fishing on the ocean and lagoon regularly for our meat.Or hunting crabs and snails with my wife on the reef, fishing with a cane pole at the reefs edge on a moonlit night with her. I gathered and husked and took out coconut meat to supplement my pigs food every day. we made handi crafts from natural materials to sell e.c.t. and I taught elementary agriculture moving between 5 schools for a little over a year. Then I made a Homestead in AR about 3 years ago had a jersey for milk lots of different poultry sheep a little bull I bought at auction 4 days old and butchered at 9 months old with my wife when I was on leave last Nov Big garden sold $400 of produce out of my first years garden. Now that it is fertile I will do a lot better when I get home.ALL the animals are gone given away mostly all but the cow I sold at a loss for $400 cause I did not know about HT. I was deployed to Kosovo Involuntarilly extended as I had planned to get out in June when my contract was up. Well I have served 4 years in the 90's and My IRR time before I came in the guard on a years trial so when I am finally done I will be homesteading for good this next time plan to raise 90% of our food all open polinated and heirloom varieties sell at the farmers market raise bees raise a few rare breed animals. e.c.t. I want to save to buy some more land as 2 acres is to small I am going to make an acre of fruit trees about an acre of black berries/blueberries/grapes and an acre of vegetables for a market garden. That is my special case. TRUE homesteader temporarilly on hold
     
  16. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    P.S My wife planted the squash and beans in the areas I had prepared last NOV yesterday I thanked her and asked her if she only did it for me she said "yes" she does not really like gardening go figure atleast she helps me out anyway usually.
     
  17. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Some in #1 do have a long term plan and are making it work. I would venture a good guess that many don't have a long term plan and are more on a day to day basis. As someone that ran a business from my home and closed it down while profitable I can say that it didn't have a big enough long term picture although it was providing well in the short term, like most small businesses in the world today.
     
  18. SFM in KY

    SFM in KY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    More or less self-sufficient to the extent that age permits. Own the place (mostly ... buying more land) and retirement income pays the basics. Raise ponies for additional income which pays their expenses and the land "improvements" ... new barn, shelters, etc.

    Don't garden because I can't work outside much during the middle of the summer and it's all I can do now to get the horse work done.

    I grew up on a ranch that was third-generation "homestead" ... my grandparents actually did homestead the original 640 acres, purchased the additional "home place" and my parents retired from the ranch in their 70s.

    Consequently I grew up in the "homestead environment" ... because of the remote area, we did not have electricity until I was about 10 or 12 ... indoor plumbing and telephone arrived after I was grown, married and gone from home. Raised nearly all our own food other than flour, sugar, coffee and that kind of thing, went to town maybe once a month during the summer, sometimes not for 3 months or more during the winter. Still did some of the farm work with a team of horses when I was small though had switched to tractor power by the time I was in my teens.
     
  19. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Well it is pretty hard to have a long range plan especially with how fast things are changing these days, The one thing that I can count on is My God is the same today yesterday and Forever. I make plans but he determines my footsteps and I can make my plans but it may be all to no avail as this very night my name could be up, and for what purpose would my plans amount? to naught I dare say. I say I am going here or there for a while and do buissness though I better remember to say God willing because he is the one in control of my life, My Life and future is in his hands and he will provide. It is important to have goals but as for myself I am not going to be concerned about long term buissness viability, In my buissness growing good food I should not have to worry, people will always have to eat and if no one else wants my homegrown food I will eat it myself. Homesteading for me is who I am and I am not going to change anything because it is not "Viable" long term I do things because they are right and good I dont care if it is financially the best. Perhaps I am naive and will die an old impoverished man, but so be it atleast I will have lived my dreams and remained as FREE as humanely possible in this day and age of encroaching enslavement from every angle.Free in every sense of the word and will have done my best to make the world a better place as I shine brightly as a beacon of truth and humbly ("ok" I am not as humble yet as I should be but it sounded good) follow the footsteps of my peasant ancestors as I try my hardest to preserve the original animals and plants and way of life they worked so hard to develop and perfect over thoasands of years and that sustained them as they sustain me as I march on beating my undersized drum oblivious or resisting to the utmost of my abilities all intrusions into the less well worn and challenging overgrown path of faith I trod.
    HELP I think old hoots and Bumpuses posts with a little Gordonshumway thrown in for good measure are starting to bring my true self out of the closet.Speaking from the heart now. Am I poetic because it is past bed time and i am sleepy or am I sleepy because I am poetic? Or maybe I am not poetic at all just sleepy my roomate just came in the computer room and asked me isn't it past your bed time?
     
  20. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    I'm in between homestead resident and rural resident,but I could also fit into future homesteader. I chose rural resident,because that's my main objective in life..to be rural. The homesteading part is hopefully something I can continue to do and expand on throughout my life.