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Hi,

I found this site a few months when I was looking for ideas on food storage. My goal was to prepare my family for the possibility of high inflation and food shortages. After reading a lot of great posts it seems to me there are four types of people here: short-term preppers, long-term emergency preppers, homesteaders and survivalists.

Short-term Preppers: People preparing for short-term emergencies, power outages, etc.

Emergency Preppers: People preparing for long-term (1-year) breakdowns in civil services and disruptions in supplies (food).

Homesteaders: People interested in living a more self-reliant life maybe even off the grid.

Survivalists: People preparing for the end of civilization.

I thought I had a clear plan but now I not sure who I am. Instead of choosing one I think I am going to work my plan in stages. Prepare for short-term emergencies, then long-term emergencies and then off the grid (I will stop here, as it is a little depressing reading all the worst-case scenarios. I figure at that point it will be in God’s hands).

Going from no preparations to fully self-reliant seems overwhelming. Does this sound logical to all of you experts here (or anyone really)?

I would love to hear your thoughts.

John
 

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AFKA ZealYouthGuy
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John, welcome aboard.

First, know this, there are no "professionals" here. Everyone here has their own ideas, some time-proved, some not... some work for other people, but not for me (because we are different), some experiment, some use only what they have known.

What we DO have here are many people with many experiences. Our resident food storage guru is A.T. Hagan. The reason he is our guru, isn't because everyone does everything like he does, but that he does many things and experiments what is best for him and reports to us when we ask. It's all about sharing information.

Like anything, the more you do it, the more experience you will gain. Hopefully, with guidance we can all minimize costly mistakes... although in my life, those are the ones that I remember the clearest.

I think there is a good and healthy progression that happens when you start small and then increase as situations arise that prove the worth of prepping (in your own life and those around you). I would be more worried if you went from non-prepper to survivalist (on your list of progression) because those people seem to be flashes in the pan.

Slow and steady wins the race. Unless of course the race is over before you start... then scratch that.

These are uncertain times. I think you have to move at what you and your family are comfortable with.

Again, welcome aboard.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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i think my family, and myself by default, fall into the middle two categories and favoring the third. being off the grid has never been a goal, but since my dad grew up in the depression and mom during ww2, they both embraced homesteading tendencies and prep for long term tendencies. we have always grown and canned food. we have always had some sort of livestock and have hunted for meat. we have always cut firewood to provide or suppliment heat.

i think seedspreader gave good advice. do what you are comfortable doing. i like to look long term and adjust my preps and skills accordingly. my goal isn't "survival"...it's living. i try to enjoy all of the tasks associated with my way of life. i try to learn skills that allow me to be as self-reliant as i can be.
 

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Big Front Porch advocate
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Hi John... and welcome.
Survival is many things. I hope this forum can help someone survive just the economy and living costing more, even in a city apartment to all the way to doing it all themselves and anything in between.

So, we all usually start small, and work to more reliance upon ourselves and less on running to the store for everything twice a day.

And there are general prep stuff, like for storms and such and then there are the 'zombie attacks' we sometimes talk of.

Anyway, welcome - find where you're comfortable and go that one step further to grow a bit....

Angie
 

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Then there are the weird ones like me who think that prepping is a means of long-term frugality, are optimists, liberal pacifists, so we don't own any weapons and are sitting targets if the tin foil weirdos are actually right. :p I think they used to call us hippies. (P.S. I'm not a homesteader, either, but a farmgirl-turned-landowner... crop land, so really, truly I fall into none of the categories.)
 

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I think I fall within the first three. I started out by getting a BOB ready for everyone in the house (there are 6 of us and two dogs). That took me to preparing for short term emergencies and/or power outages. In my area the main power outage will come in the winter with a snow storm and (less likely) a hurricane in the summer. We have had only one day so far this year but I had my lanterns, coleman stove w/propane, lots of extra blankets and wood for my fireplace to keep up warm. Two years ago this would not have been the case.

About a year ago I started to ramp up my food storage. I have always had "extra" and could get thru a week or two if needed. My first goal was to get 3 months put up, and then 6 months and so on.

I have also learned how to can my own food and just this weekend have bought my first sewing machine. I have bought heirloom seeds to start my first garden in several years. I would love be a little more self sufficiant but I live on the outskirts of a city and do not have enough land for chickens or other livestock. I have also looked into getting off the grid but I just dont see it happening, no extra $$, its expensive. My DH and I have made the decision to move within 5 yrs. There are personal reasons why we cant move before that so we are using this time to decide where we would like to move.
 

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Super Moderator
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That's IT!

I am a HIPPIE! :happy:

I am not really a prepper: I just have some meat, canned goods for the next power failure, things that I bought on sale, chickens, battery powered lights, candles, a fireplace, a garage full of all sorts of tools, whatever wood I come by, and so forth!

It was all very convenient when we had no power.:viking:

And, I am NOT a pacifist, but since I do not use guns I do not have any.

I tell myself that I am prepping for the next disaster and/or layoff, but the truth is it just seems prudent to have stuff set by. The world is just not safe. So, I am a HIPPIE!:benice:
 

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Welcome! I am a little dizzy tonight from my ride in the little boat circling the drain as I keep up with current world events; I think I just might be a 3 and a half. All in all doesn't look good on the world front. Guess I could be a full 4 if I could decide on just one event to worry about! Now,(taking my tounge out of my cheek) I feel you won't find more good,solid, USEABLE information and advice anywhere else on the web. Every journey starts when you take the first step, and I think you took that when you joined us.
 

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I think I am a opportunist, a collector and a bargain hunter. For the reason you cited. The economy.
What you need to do is decied what is needed to keep comfortable and healthy the next few years and look in your area for the best way to take advantage of what is available.
Wholesale, thrift, barter ect.
 

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My goal was to prepare my family for the possibility of high inflation and food shortages. After reading a lot of great posts it seems to me there are four types of people here: short-term preppers, long-term emergency preppers, homesteaders and survivalists.
that's probably a fairly reasonable breakdown. As you noticed, everyone is coming from a slightly different perspective. Many of the hotly debated topics here are due to those unspoken assumptions people have.

Prepping for what keeps you awake at night makes sense. I agree the possibility of high inflation, in food and everything else, is worth taking seriously.

I thought I had a clear plan but now I not sure who I am. Instead of choosing one I think I am going to work my plan in stages. Prepare for short-term emergencies, then long-term emergencies and then off the grid [....]

Going from no preparations to fully self-reliant seems overwhelming. Does this sound logical to all of you experts here (or anyone really)?
Doing it phases is the only way that makes sense. And they build on each other too, as most types of problems resolve back into basic human needs -- water, shelter from weather, food, medical issues, physical security/protection, communication, transportation.

Everyone feels overwhelmed at first. But it does get better. Getting your short term preps in place builds confidence. You realize the commonality among problems, so prepping for one builds up preps for all. You think thru the various disaster scenarios and make your own evaluation of how likely it is -- what gets the press in many cases is grossly overstated in my personal opinion. And you realize that nothing comes with guarantees, so all you can do is improve the odds.

Lastly, there is no "self sufficiency", only degrees of self sufficiency. Are you gonna make your own salt? Are you gonna perform your own appendectomy? Not likely. Pick the low-hanging fruit, and keep building on it over time. Integrate it into your lifestyle. Keep learning.

--sgl
 

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Mountaineers are free
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My wife and I fit neatly into 2 & 3 with a little hidden amount of 4 under the beds and in the closets. We have always gardened and toiled with projects from chickens to pigs, just to live "That life", however about two years ago we started to see the current events of today starting to come at us and we became more serious about our approach to being prepared. I'm a military man and am used to thinking about protection and defensive needs, however we are God fearing and believe we should share in the event of some type of disaster. So going fully to number 4 causes some conflict from within.

Anyway... Welcome to the best resource on the Internet for the preparation minded family or individual... great folks with great experiences. I probably could have lived my whole life without anyone's advice, however now that I have their advice I have found some faster, better and more organized ways to do some old fashioned things.

Thanks everyone :)
 

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We started by being able to deal with a day or two without power. Moved on to being snowed in for a week. Then moved up to 2 weeks worth of stuff.

We are now set were we can hide out for 30 days as we currently live, longer if we conserve reserves.

We will keep working to get to 90 days, then will start to work on own power supplies.
 

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First three- except the off-the grid part. Although, I'm thinking two on more of a personal level (job loss, illness, other personal devastation). I have more faith in being able to care for my family than I have faith in my government being able to care for my family (i.e., Katrina). Besides, it's MY job to take care of my family, it is NOT the government's job.

4? As long as their are wonderful people in the world like those on this board, CIVILIZATION will thrive.
 

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In Remembrance
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3, I think. Somehow the end of civilization doesn't sound too comfy. ;)
 

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Thinking about the 4 types, I would say I was all of the above, depending on the day of the week and what I just viewed on the evening news! :D
I just stock up and prepare for any scenario I guess.

I feel pretty comfortable, every once in awhile I will read something or hear some doom day program and feel a bit anxious.

But building up in stages is a good idea. Think short-term then work up to long-term, take it day by day.

Just having that feeling of security can do wonders for ones sanity in this crazy world.
 
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Short-term Preppers: People preparing for short-term emergencies, power outages, etc.

Emergency Preppers: People preparing for long-term (1-year) breakdowns in civil services and disruptions in supplies (food).

Homesteaders: People interested in living a more self-reliant life maybe even off the grid.

Survivalists: People preparing for the end of civilization.
I guess I'm mostly Short-term Prepper, with a little Emergency Prepper thrown in. I would like to be a Homesteader, dunno if that will ever happen. I'm not a Survivalist at all because I don't believe there will ever be the end of civilization (but I could be wrong LOL).

If you're just starting out, my best advice is to go slow and steady. You can get overwhelmed in a hurry. You can also end up with a lot of stuff you don't need and lacking in stuff you do need.
 

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NJ Rich
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I fall into the Emergency Prepper area of one year and working. Most of us here will fall within the first three prep areas.

One big problem we have is rotating our stocks. Since there are only two of us and the wife eats those diet dinners a couple of times a week we need to buy less or give away more.

Since the bird flu has dropped off some peoples radar getting her to agree to prep has become more difficult. No, it hasn't dropped off my radar. But there are a lot of other issues we should prepare for. Just look around and I am sure most of us know someone who has lost their job.

Let me say these things:

There are no stupid questions, just questions that need to be asked. You are in a friendly area here. So ask!!

Don't get overwhelmed by it all. You will be surprised how far an extra $10.00 a week spent in the food store will help you prep. "Search" will lead you to a lot more information.

I don't broad cast our preps. In difficult times you may find a line in front of your house.
I have enough family to prep for since they don't. :bdh:

Welcome to HT. :cowboy: NJ Rich
 
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