Who am I? Clintonia Uniflora, Queen's Cup Bead Lilly

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by bare, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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  2. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Hmmm, no guesses even...

    Here's a couple more images. The first one I posted earlier may be a bit unusual because I have never seen more than a single berry on the stalk.

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    This is the same plant obviously, but in flower:

    [​IMG]

    I can't tell you much about the plant itself, 'cause I couldn't find much on the net surprisingly.

    What I can tell you is that it is one of the more common herbacious plants in my area of N. Idaho and I have seen it from Alaska to N. California and in the wetter, forested sections of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Western Montana. It's a very important indicator species for determining forest habitat types. I've seen grouse eat the berry and seen evidence of either deer, elk or moose having chomped them off, so they must be edible, although I can tell you from experience that it must be an acquired taste. They like to keep their feet wet but prefer shade.

    Bonus points for naming the small plant below the big one in the last picture.
     

  3. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    The flowering photo throws me off a bit, we have them around here witha yellowish bloom but with the same type of berry known as bluebead lilly
     
  4. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    You got it Taters'Pa. In this case it's Clintonia Uniflora, Queen's Cup Bead Lilly and I've heard it called Bride's bonnet I think.Your yellow-flowered variety will be another species of Clintonia. I think of it still as Clun which is the short notation for scientific purposes, although now I believe they call it Clun2. The Small-leaved leathery plant below the Clun is Pachistima.

    It grows in the same locale as Wild Ginger.
     
  5. Tater'sPa

    Tater'sPa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info!
    hmmm, I'm not familiar with that one but will check it out. :)
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Pachistima Myrsinites, Myrtle Boxwood, around here, a low-growing almost viney, woodey plant with leathery/waxy looking leaves. Highly serate margins. Tiny red flowers in Spring.

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