White Oak Acrons

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Fire-Man, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does anyone on here eat White oak acrons?? I have some falling of the tree's as big or bigger than a pecan after the acron's are hulled. I sampled one--it was bitter but sure looked good---alot more meat in it than a pecan. Is there away to dry or prepare them where the bitterness gets out of them? Thanks Randy
     
  2. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    I read in a book years ago that said to process acorns people would hull them then boil them in water, changing it whenever it turned brown and got foamy, until the water stays clear and no foam forms - several days from the way it read. Once that was done you dry them over a low fire, in an oven, or I assume a dehydrator and grind them into a meal.

    I believe, but won't swear to it, that it was a book on edible wild foods of the Native North Americans.
     

  3. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep, you need to leach out the tannic acid before using. I do a quick grind or chop. Use frequent changes of water. I you are near a wine making supply shop, the pressing bags they sell work great. I also use an old wringer washer (speed queen). Drop the mesh bags in, let it agitate for several minutes, let them soak for a few hours, drain and repeat. When you no longer taste the bitterness you're good to go.
     
  4. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    a book I have sez cold water soaks, as the hot water fixes the bitter taste and you cant get rid of it..

    never tried but... thats one books version..
    it says white oak is the most "paletable" once you soak the tanin out.
     
  5. PezzoNovante

    PezzoNovante Well-Known Member

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    Heh, you now know first hand why acorns weren't domesticated. The bitterness is very difficult to select for. If you have multiple trees you might try sampling each one and then choose the one that produces the least bitter acorn.

    It's a lot of work to dilute the bitterness. Time better spent collecting either pine nuts, walnuts or pecans, imo.
     
  6. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    The easiest way to eat acorns is to filter them through a pig.

    Pete
     
  7. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I read somewhere that maybe 1 in a 1000 white oak trees produce acorns that are not bitter, but they will not produce offspring that produce the same type of nut. Too bad, because they are a good nut otherwise.
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    RedneckPete I like the way you think!

    I've tried some bread and things made from acorn flour and I didn't really care for it. I was kind of disappointed about that since I love to find wild foods that I can gather but I just didn't like the product. I'm with Pete, I'll feed it to pigs or leave them for the deer. Pork and venison are far more palatable than anything made from acorns in my experience.