Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a large ram (275lb+/-) with white line separation. There is no rot, and separated hoof wall has been pared away, and resected area cleaned. No infection, normal temp/appetite.

Mr Washington is not a pet, quite feral in fact, but kind natured and relatively safe to handle once he's caught. I turned him back out after doing his feet, pasture is evenly grazed Bermuda, well drained (no wet spots) but he is dead lame- is knee grazing or prostrate 95%+ of the time.

I am a farrier by trade. If this were a horse, I could readily support the load. I thought of forging him a wee shoe (like an ox shoe), but reality is there isn't enough wall to nail to nor enough sound structure to support a glued shoe.

My question is this: how can I support him (pain wise and physically) while I wait for new horn to grow? How fast do sheep grow hoof?

Also- I'll have to pull him from the flock into the barn to be able to treat him, suggestions for keeping his appetite up and gut in good order?
ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1412067218.563489.jpg
ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1412067218.563489.jpg
 

·
Just living Life
Joined
·
8,280 Posts
The Kat ewe I bought a couple of years ago... her hooves where really bad, very over grown.
Because of that, her side walls keep separating from her inner hoof. I keep her trimmed.. but it doesn't see to make a difference.
Was hoping with good care, over time it would start growing normally. No such luck sadly. She does walk normally though.

You could put some long lasting hoof stuff in the separation, to see if that will help.
Maybe a small cow block, pared down to fit your Ram would help support his hoof while it grows back?

Here is a list of things that can cause this...

http://www.sheep101.info/201/hoofcare.html

Hopefully one of the other shepherds will have some good advise.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,577 Posts
Maybe keep him in a well bedded stall and feed hay until he's able to stand normally. You could give him a bit of banamine for pain and see if that helps. They also sell hoof boots for sheep/goats, and you could use that to treat and keep the hoof protected. Do you have a mild mannered wether that could keep him company until he's returned?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I think I'm going to get a tube of superfast and build him a foot. I didn't get my brain completely wrapped around it last night, but read another farrier's opinion and realized that with the major weight dif (horses vs sheep), superfast will prob hold up without a shoe.

MDK- I don't keep wethers, unfortunately. I do have my dairy ewes, who are pets and (probably) bred already. They are also substantial, bigger than my Rambo ewes, at around 185lb-200lb. I'm just scared he'll pound someone into a wall in the scramble to get away.

I think once I have him doctored a little I'll put him out in my "mini sheep tractor" (aka the lawn crew!) that my bummers live in and toss them in a paddock. That way I can put the rolling pen next to some ewes, without risking them in a confined space with him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes, he does now. I would wager that when I bought him, as a 2 y/o (a year ago), that he had never seen minerals in his life. I use fertrell sheep mineral, with Redmond salt, loose, w kelp and ACV.

Should I supplement something?
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top