Which Way Do You Run Your Stove Pipe and Why?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fantasymaker, Mar 13, 2011.

Which Way is Up?

  1. I like the reduced End Up

  2. I like the reduced Down

  3. Neither

  4. HUH?

Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Ok Do you like the reduced end up or Down?

    WHY?
     
  2. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Smoke rises. With the reduced end up smoke cannot escape by going under the edge of the mating pipe. Of course when there is a draft problem it can still escape.
     

  3. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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    Creosote stays inside the pipe if the reduced end is down.

    Kathie
     
  4. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    reduced end down as littlebit said!
     
  5. StormontMarty

    StormontMarty New Member

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    I had my stove inspected last year and had to flip my piping. Inspector said the easy way to know is, if you'd pour water down the chimney from the roof, it wouldn't come in thru the joints. First I ever heard of that.
     
  6. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 13, 2011
  7. Travis in Louisiana

    Travis in Louisiana Clinton, Louisiana

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    The reduced end was down, because that is the way it fit in the woodstove. About halfway up there is a slider pipe that is used to connect the single pipe through the ceiling jack, then out to the roof. This slider pipe makes it easy to assemble and clean.
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Yep, thats the long and the short of it. If I just had to have it the other way, would have to crip the non-reduced end so first section would be reduced on both ends. I have seen stoves though where you need the non-reduced end to fit over the flange. If everything works as its supposed to, then doesnt really matter. There should be enough draw to take smoke up and out without dripping creosote either way. If you are dripping significant creosote, then you are burning too green wood.
     
  9. 7thswan

    7thswan Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The crimped edge goes down. There is no "like" about it.
     
  10. Nimrod

    Nimrod Guest

    Crimped end goes down so the cresote stays inside the pipe, as others have said. Cover the outside of the joint with high temp silicon caulk if you are worried about smoke escaping.
     
  11. woodsy

    woodsy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Male end down, also known as the reduced or crimped end.
    No stinking creoste drips or obnoxious smell.
     
  12. VaFarmer

    VaFarmer Well-Known Member

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    with male end down it is recommended to coat the connection with high temp sealer or make sure you have a pair of good fitting pipe so smoke or exhaust can not escape around the connection. With male end up you have a funnel effect of the lower pipe feeding to the inside of the upper pipe and no exhaust leak. Have installed stoves that start with a male end at stove and instructions state to install with male ends feeding up, and have seen stoves the opposite way also. Fire Marshel here likes them male feeding up into female so sparks & fumes cannot escape. Local stove store tells everybody to do it opposite so cresote dosn't run to outside of pipe. If I was careless enough and had to worry about cresote running down a stove pipe I won't burn wood, that much cresote and not useing a chimney spark arrester with a cap to prevent rain entry, the person deserves to have there house burned out from under them. !!!!
     
  13. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Assuming a drawing wood stove or wood boiler, the correct way is with the crimped end down. As the chmney cools it will condense some moisture, and if you assemble the other way your joints will leak black goo out each joint, even if you are so perfect you don't think you will ever make any creosote. ;)

    A properly drawing chinmey will have a slight natural vaccum and so will not leak smoke out the joints, at least not after a very brief warmup.

    I don't know much about powered exhausts (pellet stoves or some exotic wood stoves), or if you were talking about lp/ natural gas devices, etc - that would be a whole different deal.

    --->Paul
     
  14. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ditto
     
  15. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whut 'e said!:viking:
     
  16. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    You apparently have never tried to use some of old "antique" stoves that I have. Some were designed where the crimped end simply doesnt fit the flange, but the non-crimped end does. Now not arguing the best way to go in such a situation is to simply cut the crimped part off so you have first section of stove pipe with no crimped end. But the manufacturer of the stove must have intended that stove pipe was installed opposite of what you think is an absolute rule.

    And again if your wood is well cured and you burn a hot fire, there simply isnt that much creosote to ever cause a problem. If you have creosote running down pipe no matter how you install it, then you are burning too green wood or have stove set to burn too low or both.
     
  17. Cheribelle

    Cheribelle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep! Another vote for this way.
     
  18. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    I'm a reduced end down sorta guy myself but was stunned that the Vozelgang stove kit I bought wont work that way it needs the big end down.
    I thought maybe it was just me.
    But apparently the folks at Vozelgang don't actually USE their product?
     
  19. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I believe what you need is a stovetop adapter like this one

    [​IMG]
     
  20. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Id thought about cutting the reduced end off of one section of pipe. Wont that give me the same result?
    The reason that I haven't though is like with a adapter I'm still going to have the same result creosote on the outside of the stove..