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Mrs. Mo-Town has decreed that various items of "junk" around my workshop need to be gone before our relatives come over for Thanksgiving. I've tried to convince her that I may have need for this "junk" sometime in the future, but she's not buying it, and I've got to admit I don't even believe my argument when it comes to some of the things she's talking about.

Anyhow, I've started loading my truck for that long, sad, haul to the local dump, but I've got a couple things I'll need to cut up before they fit. One is a fiberglass and steel camper shell from an old pickup. It's too long for me to attach to the current truck, and it's so nasty I couldn't even give it away for free on Craigslist.

So I'm going to need to cut the beast down to size, and this means purchasing the one power tool that's somehow managed to escape my collection thus far, a reciprocating saw. Mrs. Mo-Town can't even complain about my getting a new tool. :)

So here's my question: what brand of reciprocating saw would you recommend for this kind of heavy duty cutting? I plan on getting a corded saw, but other than that, I'd appreciate any advice folks can offer me as to how much power I should be looking for or which brands you've had the best results with.
 

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.............Milwaukee although I think they're made in China , now:shrug: . My Porter-Cable Tiger saw is ten years old and still works great and it has the quick disconnect for blades , Ryobi seems to have improved the quality of their products of late , and Mikita isn't what it use to be . I'd peruse the Pawn shops for availability of such if it carries a name of a major mfger . , fordy
 

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I love South Dakota
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DH and I never liked our Milwaukee. DH thought all reciprocating saws worked like that one so just put up with it. Then a few years ago we bought a Bosch, and oh what a difference! Like night and day. We didn't have a low end Milwaukee either.

We've been doing serious remodeling work on our house with a lot of demo. Also, get GOOD blades and expect that you will wear them out. The cheap ones cost a lot less and wear out (or bend ) a lot faster.

We also have a cordless Bosch. It works nice but does not have near the snot as the corded model.

Cathy
 

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de oppresso liber
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What ever brand you decide on I suggest buying it at a pawn shop and don't be afraid to offer less than the 'sticker price'. I got a variable speed, orbital cutting Milwaukee one at a pawn shop of less than $50. I love the quick change blade feature on it.
 

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I've got a Makita and two cordless 18 volt DeWalts. I use the DeWalts a lot and the Makita stays in the case most of the time. I would buy the cordless one for the most useful. Just so handy to grab and carry it around. I picked mine up in passing on my way out the door to the mailbox to quick cut a few branches that have been bugging me. There's nothing like them for being handy.

Jennifer
 

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DH has a Milwaukee and has had it for over 25 years. He's a remodeler and it has seen a lot of use.
 

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I have a year old Milwaukee Sawzall 120v. It's American made with a 5 year warranty.

It has been used to saw on thick cast iron for an hour and a half straight and it did not even blink.

I paid $104 for it on the Internet.

Probably be be the last one I'll ever need to buy. ;)
 

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I have a corded Ryobie SP? and have had it for 10 years atleast the only thing that had to be replaced is the blades.
I also have a cordless Craftsman which works great also.

dale
 

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Alternatives are a jig saw, circular saw with a cheap blade installed backwards or an angle grinder with cutoff blade. Remember eye & respiratory protection.

Of course, if this is a ruse to purchase a reciprocating saw, please disregard.:walk:
 

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I have a Makita that has served me well for 15 years. I also have several other tools from Makita I like as well as some excellent ones from DeWalt.
 

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I love my Milwaukee.

How much do you want to spend, or how much will the spouse let you blow on this tool?

When I bought my Milwaukee, they were about $139 or so, but I got mine for $99 on super sale.

At the time, the cheap knock-offs were $79. I am told the knock offs, like the Craftsman brand, are even cheaper today. I have been told that a super nice used one can be gotten off ebay really inexpensively.

There are advantages to buying a new Milwaukee, but for the occasional use, a nice used knock-off might just be the trick.

My recommendation would be different if you told me you were going to start scrapping metals or starting a demo business.

This is what I would opt for....I think....a good used one off ebay. I don't think I would ever live without a Sawzall again.

Also, I would pass on the ultra cheap recip saws.

Clove
 

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AFKA ZealYouthGuy
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More information:

Is the purpose to cut this up, occasionally use a saw, and get it done economically and practically...

or is the purpose to add a quality tool to your tools.

Most of the time I am a BIG "Buy quality tools for long term use" guy, but the costs of some of the name brand tools they are throwing around on this thread won't give the occasional user any noticeable quality over a much cheaper reciprocating saw.

I bought a chinese harbor freight Reciprocating saw for $20.00 that is strong and easy to use, and I don't care about tearing it up (I was cutting a catalytic converter off of a van that I junked and it started to tear up my portable-battery operated reciprocating saw. The angle was driving it into a piece of frame and bolt sticking through it. The cheap chinese one has a thick rubber covering and I didn't care if it did tear up or not. It didn't though.

In MY opinion, even a cheap reciprocating saw will do what you need to do, where you need to spend money is on quality blades.

Quality blades can make your reciprocating saw (whatever brand) more effective and efficient... don't buy the cheap ones.

But yeah, if you want a quality tool then Milwaukee is a great saw and so is Makita.

Perhaps the BEST solution is to buy a used quality tool (The old Milwaukee SAWZALL was the one that the legends are based on) because you get a great tool at a lower price.
 

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I have a Milwaukee , but just picked up a Ridgid 120 V model .
We were at a auction house for a general weekly auction , at the end , the whole tables start at $1.00 , My wife got one for $16.00 for the glassware to resell at a flea mkt.
There was a box under the table filled with tools , hammers , drill bits ,DeWalt var. speed drill ,and the Sawz All , a older one with the allen key. :icecream:
Bob
 

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I'll be loan dissenter and mention using the topper for an animal shelter. Work well to shelter chickens from rain or perhaps dogs. Some people put up rinky dink walls and add toppers as the roof.

No need for a saw as as you can probably use force and break it down to a size that can be hauled.

Have you considered using the new saw to shorten the topper, re-fiberglass it back together, give it a thorough sanding to removed the grunge and then painting it to match your current vehicle?

At one of those traveling tool sales I purchased two packs of reciprocating saw blades that offered free single speed saw with purchase. So for about $8 I got to packs of blades and a saw I figured would make a few cuts. I didn't even get through one cut before it failed--about what I really expected. My point is that you and others should take heed and get a good one--just as you are asking about and planning to do. You're a wise man.
 

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I've never been disappointed by any De Walt tool I've ever purchased...they would get the nod
 
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