Which plants could make the most money?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Wannabee, Feb 11, 2005.

Which plants would make the most money in your area, with least amount of investment?

  1. tomato plants to sell (not tomatos - just plant)

  2. mums

  3. peppers

  4. other - please submit ideas!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    If you had a backyard nursery, and space was limited, which plants would you offer? Which plants would make the most money compared to time and effort?? I am thinking about tomato plants - has anyone done this before? A friend of mine raised mums and sold a BUNCH. Anyone else have any ideas?? I've also started a poll.
     
  2. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I think herb plants will sell well too.
     

  3. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    You might do well with peppers. It's hard to find pepper seedlings that are something besides your standard green bell.
    I worked at a large commercial greenhouse last year, and petunias for bedding were the #1 seller. One color combo that went well was red, white and blue together in a flat.
    Good luck!
     
  4. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a hoophouse, or it it all outdoors? I would think that in a greenhouse, orchids would bring top dollar per plant. Outdoors ornamental gourds, indian corn, and pumpkins bring a nice profit in fall. Best of luck!
     
  5. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    Right now I have a 9x12 homemade hoophouse - OK, I know it is not big, but I am planning to start slowly. I am just trying to figure out what I should do with it! First the hoophouse, and now it is time to fill it! But with what?????????
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Okra is a good money maker if you have the space; indoors you might try 'cactus cities' with a varity for decorations. The mini ones sell well for $5 to 10 in a nice display dish.
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    try celery plants

    leeks and different onion family varieties such as red onions. Grow them to at least pencil thickness size and sell by the dozen or so. easy to transplant

    ornamantal peppers, eggplants

    charentais melon plants and hybrid watermelon such as the yelllow ones

    bush squash plants, cucumber and pickle plants

    citronella plants (has natural mosquito repellent) I believe this is a specialized plant in the geranium family?

    easy maintenance plants such as drought tolerant and shade tolerant flower plants
     
  8. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I was going back and forth between the tomatoes and the mums.
    My question would be....what kind of area are you in? Do alot of people grow their own food? Is it mostly middle income area with "landscapes"?
    One thing I've noticed around here....people who don't have vegetable gardens will have a barrel of tomato plants and everyone gets mums in the fall when it gets depressingly brown.
    To start with those two would be a safe move. Even with the size greenhouse you have, those could be spread out over time. Or, grow hardy mums and then do cuttings in the spring, ready for fall sale.
     
  9. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I voted for tomatoes, but peppers are good too. I would do several heirloom varieties. I would also try to get the plants grown as large as possible because lots of folks seem to want the larger plants, especially in shorter season areas. Another thing is instead of starting all your plants from seed, you can get several plants grown out and take cuttings. This is really good if you have one plant that does extremely well in your garden. The large cuttings take much less time to root and get to planting out stage than seeds will.
     
  10. Marlene

    Marlene Member

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    I have a small greenhouse and live in a very rural area. I raised tomato and pepper plants but their was no way I could compete with the local feed store prices. I raised quite a few varieties and they were very healthy but the economy in this area is rather poor and people could not afford to pay what I had in these plants, not even counting my time for transplanting and nurturing them. Check out your competition and your market for whatever you decide to grow and good luck. Marlene
     
  11. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    I voted for tomatoes. I didn't read any othere replies, so I'm sorry if someone else said this already...almost everybody grows at least a few tomatoes, so I'd think that would be the best seller. They are usually very easy to start, so I'd think you'd have good luck with that. I'd recommend having lots of the normal favorites and then a few weird ones to try to lure folks to try something different.
     
  12. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    a freind and i are in the midst of this very discussion. she has many years experience in the greenhouse business. she said the backbone and biggest seller was always annuals- like the petunias mentioned above, marigolds,zinnias, stuff that wil bloom all season will little care. anything like people would pick up in the spring, easy to grow and maintain for the front yard. the rest, vegetables, herbs and all, is gravy.
     
  13. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We had very good luck with eggplant. Couldn't keep up with the demand. Also melons of all kinds; good return on investment. Cukes did well as did zucchini. Everyone grew tomatoes so didn't sell that many of them and they were a lot of work. Okra was like growing weeds and not everyone around here grew them. Yellow peppers were good sellers, as were lemon cukes. Burpless cukes were also vegies that grew like weeds and brought in good money. Corn was a lot of trouble for little return. The worms were terrible. Won't grow for market this year. We also had lots of herbs but didn't any other than basil once in awhile. Find out what your competition is growing and give your customers a good deal. They will come to you instead. My neighbor grew organic and had lots of customers. She also joined the C of C and it was well worth the $130. They did all her advertising for her.
     
  14. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    I've been thinking this over for a few days (sorry, I'm slow :) ). What about hanging baskets of annuals? Around here, nice big ones go for $20 a piece and all that is in them is some wave petunias, impatiens, or geraniums with some trailing vines over the side (not exactly sure what those are). If you could get them ready by mother's day, you could probably make a lot of money then. The pretty pre-made baskets probably only have 1/4 to 1/2 flat of flowers in them, so you would double your money just by putting them together. Growing them yourself would make for a huge profit. By the way, your hoophouse sounds wonderful. Any size is better than nothing (which happens to be what I have!)! Good luck. Let us know what you decide on!
     
  15. twind59

    twind59 Well-Known Member

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    I find tomato's to be a good seller. Each year I grow
    several hundred Heirloom variety tomato's and sell them for $2.00 each. For a very small startup cost one can earn several hundred dollars. I do this under light in a very small area in my basement.
    Also...there is a book by Michael McGroarty about raising nursery plants in your backyard. It's worth a read.
    Barry
    Indianapolis

     
  16. jlxian

    jlxian Also known as Jean Supporter

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    I voted for "other". I agree that annuals will be your best bet. There is a woman in our area who raises annuals each spring and sells them all. She only has sales in the spring.
     
  17. twind59

    twind59 Well-Known Member

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    Wannabee,
    Another thing I grow for cash is flowers. I have been able to get top dollar for fresh cut flowers selling them to local florists. I only use a small portion of my backyard. The best sellers have been Celosia's, Zinnia's(Benary's Giant), and Gomphrena's.
    I have to share this. The first time I tried to sell flowers was at the end of a season a few yers ago. I picked the last of what was in the garden just before it was suppose to frost....had about 4 buckets full of flowers. I made a list of all the area florists and amde a map and started by visiting the closest one. No sale. They liked the flowers but said that they had just bought enought to fill their cooler. I was depressed. I decided that it was probably not such a good idea and that if the second florist didn't want anything then I would just call it quits. I drove to the 2nd florist and carried 2 buckets with me to the front door. I literally had one foot inside the place when the owner saw me and said "do you have any more of that? I'll take all you have." He gave me top dollar and I went back to my truck...skipping like a little schoolgirl with the cash in my hands. Anyone driving by would have thought I was nuts!
    So..for me what works is tomato plants in the spring and flowers later in the summer. I don't make a lot, but it's fun and the pocket cash is nice to have.
     
  18. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whatever your local Wal Mart isn't selling :(
     
  19. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    Thanks for everyone's suggestions! I really appreciate it! Barry - I am also in Indiana. I think you are right on the tomatos....
    Have you actually read McGroarty's stuff?? Is it worth the price that he asks????
     
  20. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    Keep the ideas coming!!!!!!!!!