Which one should I steer?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by georgiarebel, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    I raise Dexter cattle in Georgia and the last two calves I've had have been bulls. I've got 2 other bulls already (Dun) & (Red), so I'll have my hands full before long. I've found that the bulls are harder to sell than the heifers or cows, because 1 bull can take care of up to 12-15 cows. I've only have 10 acres, so I can't carry too many, and I'm up to 8 now. I have 2 heifers and another cow due early next year.

    Both are black bulls, one is about 12 months old, and the other is about 2 months old. If I can't sell them before long I've gave serious consideration to having them steered. Was wonder which one or both should I steer? Would it be better to go ahead and steer the younger one, and continue to sell the other, or vise versa?

    I really hate to steer either as both have such good pedigrees. I've got plans to build a website to get more visibility. If someone knows of anyone looking for Dexter’s please let me know. They'd make someone a good herd bull.

    GR
     
  2. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For me, the pedigree wouldn't matter as much as the qualities of the dams. Is one cow slightly better than the other?? Does one have a certain fault or personality flaws that the other doesn't?? Milking ability?? Conformation?? Temperment?? Length of lactation?? Milking ease?? Health?? Those are the things that I would decide on.
    Maybe they are both perfect, but I know I have seen some really crappy bulls with great pedigrees.....not saying yours are by any means, just saying that I'd buy the animal before I'd buy the papers if you get what I mean. :)
     

  3. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    there are PLENTY of bulls out there, unless one was WAY WAY SUPERIOR and could actually add some sort of bennifit to the breed i would steer them both, just because they have a pedigree doesnt mean they are worth keeping as breeders, and thats all a bull really is good for is breeding.
    the bull calf would have to be from an AWSOME dam and sire and be so good in every way that it would be worth keeping in your breeding program, each new generation of breeding male animals should be the absolute best possible and have something to contribute that the males before them didnt have, other wise they are worth more in the freezer
     
  4. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice. As I mentioned I have two other bulls, (Dun) is my main bull and the sire of both calves. We went all the way to Texas to get my (Red) bull with the intention of trying to produce red calves. I plan on switching them with the cows from year to year. I don't need to carry more than two bulls.

    I am impressed with calves my main bull has produced, but then I partial :cool: Both have grown fast and have great muscularity.

    How old and big should I let them get before I put them in the freezer?

    GR
     
  5. JulieLou42

    JulieLou42 Well-Known Member

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    Steer [band] the younger right away; depending on your financial status and the temperament of the older bull...he could be in the freezer any time.

    Someone on this forum said two years for Dexters, but anytime you're ready ...you could put 'em in the freezer.
     
  6. Karin L

    Karin L Bovine and Range Nerd

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    I'd like to see some pics of them first before I could tell you which one to castrate.

    Some folks butcher when they're 6 months, others wait until they're 18 months.
     
  7. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    If I could figure out how to post pictures on this forum I'd be happy to show the ones I have. I like showing them off. :cool: I get a kick out watching people slow down when they drive by the pasture. Dexter's aren't something you see everyday.

    GR
     
  8. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    GR,,,you have a PM....Tennessee John
     
  9. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    As Clemenza said in The Godfather "Leave the Gun, Take the Canolies"...
    Translated to your situation that means leave the Big Guns(2 Big Bulls) and take "the Canolies" off both of the young'ins. Ya got plenty of BullPower now.
     
  10. Morning Owl

    Morning Owl Well-Known Member

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    I wish you lived closer. I want to get a dexter next spring :rolleyes:
     
  11. JulieLou42

    JulieLou42 Well-Known Member

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    To post photos, go to photobucket.com and follow instructions there. It's pretty easy.
     
  12. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Julielou42

    Here's a picture of the older bull of the two

    [​IMG]

    and the baby bull

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Tiffin

    Tiffin Well-Known Member

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  14. DJ

    DJ Well-Known Member

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    You only need one. Pick the one you like best. Steer the two youngest. Band or sell the older bull. Use the feed they'd eat to feed another cow.
     
  15. translplant

    translplant Well-Known Member

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    I would steer both the blacks. You have a game plan already in place with your two other bulls - stick with it.

    I have the exact same situation with two really good herd sires, one dun and one red. Those black bull calves are so hard to part with, I know. And they're really hard to find homes for as herd sires too.

    I haved steered (cut) after weaning and am looking to put the first 18-20 month old in the freezer after doing a little grain finishing. I'm going to keep the next one completely on grass and have a taste test.
     
  16. Karin L

    Karin L Bovine and Range Nerd

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    Do you have a better pic of the calf? like a side view, and same with the older bull, kind of hard to see them from thataway. (Squat down on your knee and take a pic that way with a good side veiw of both of them, if you can)

    I would definately steer the older bull, but I'm still not sure about your calf there....
    Now I hate to rip him up but the older bull looks a bit thin from the pic, and should've been steered in the first place. Unless it's just me or the breed (or the pic :rolleyes: ).

    So PLEASE, if you can, try to get a better pic of those two...puhleeaazze...
     
  17. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    Tiffin

    All my cows are registered with both the ADCA & PDCA. Didn't know that about the USDA. I've know city folk I work with who are very interested in the idea of buying organic meat.

    Transplant

    Sounds like a plan. I'll probably call the vet this week to see what he'll charge and then fatten him up for another 6 months. Funny how when you take care of something for so long its hard to consider it. With the pasture going away for the winter I'm about to start them on peanut hay. They love the stuff and pack on the pounds.

    Karin L

    No offense taken, but keep in mind he was only about 6 month old in the picture. He's over a year old now. In Georgia we deal with 100+ degree days in the summer. They put on thicker coats and weight during the winter. I'll try to take some updated pics this week.

    GR