Which majors would be best for future jobs?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TedH71, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Am considering going back to school. Am looking into three majors: carpentry, welding, and cnc machining. Girlfriend wants me to take carpentry even though I've had construction experience because she wants me to be able to learn how to build an add on. I want the welding since you can pretty much find a job everywhere with that and ditto with the cnc machining. Main thing is cnc machining is an indoor job usually and I find the cnc programming language interesting...any constructive advice or suggestions are much appreciated! This is for Wichita, KS areas but will try to see if I can convince the girlfriend to relocate to Texas but might be tough considering she makes good money and her health insurance is so good that we only had to pay one time fee of $20 at the first ob gyn visit and everything else after that was free (paid for) including sonograms, hospital visits, doctors...etc. Can't wait for the baby boy to be born in April! Keep in mind this is a vocational college. 1-2 years max.
     
  2. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    the CNC will get ya the better jobs then Hire the adition done!


    LOL actually you can proably do the addition with the skills you have now.
     

  3. Country Doc

    Country Doc Well-Known Member

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    I think carpentry depends on a housing boom which I believe is slowing down for a while in most areas and is at best cyclical. I don't know about CNC. I have a number of patients who do welding and are well paid. It is hard work and my oldest welder (early 50's) is practically cripple from the work.
     
  4. pistolsmom

    pistolsmom Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered HVAC?? People always need heat and they always need cool..........son went for HVAC, got a job the minute he graduated and could work 100 hours+ every week if he wanted. Good field.
     
  5. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    They never have enough cnc people in my area. The vo-tech has been trying to get that program going because businesses can't even take on extra work because they can't find workers. I guess, however, it depends on the area.
    Good luck.
    Ann
     
  6. EasyDay

    EasyDay Gimme a YAAAAY!

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    It really depends on the area where you'll end up. But good tradesmen are getting hard to find in most places. Everybody seems to want office jobs these days! In our area, most "tradesmen" are more like "handymen", not really trained... just their own experience. That works okay, too, but they often aren't licensed nor insured. A trained professional in carpentry or welding that advertises as such would be a blessing around here!

    Good luck to you! I LIKE to see people go into the real hands-on trades, and good "true" carpentry seems like a dying art sometimes.
     
  7. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, let me add that my experience with construction was basically working for Americorps building enviromentally friendly housing for low income people under contract for 1 year..I lasted 11 months due to a dispute over hours but people were great to work with. We weren't allowed to install wiring, plumbing due to city laws that said only licensed people would do that and no taping and floating...it was left to a group of people who were paid rather cheaply to do the work..they just said it would take us a bit too long to learn how to do tape and float. Rafters were already bought ready made..we did not have to put together rafters. We used metal framing instead of wood because it lasts longer and no chances of termites using it and we installed metal roofing because it lasts 50 years or so before having to be replaced..easier on the low income people's wallets, I guess. So I consider construction a field that I dabbled in but not truly learned hands on type of thing. I COULD triple major, lol, but I was thinking more of taking cnc machining and a class here or there in the carpentry field. Keep the info coming..really is helping me here! :nerd:

    p.s. HVAC...well...depends on the program..I know some areas don't pay well for HVAC people believe it or not due to the low cost of living in those areas and math..let's say that I believe I can pass shop math and maybe higher but was told I would have to take higher level mathematics at a college in Texas but here it seems to be different....
     
  8. cheapskate

    cheapskate Cheap but not free

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    I am not saying this prejudiciously....I have advised my children this. Whatever you study,compliment it with a course on Spanish language. If you wind up in industry of most any type, speaking spanish would earn you more money as a foreman,crew leader, or shift superintendant.
     
  9. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know a little Spanish but since I'm deaf, I have a hard time learning a new language since my primary language is American Sign Language. My pet peeve is that if you move to the USA, you should put some effort in learning English...that's just me but that's not really the point of this column but I do understand where you're coming from!
     
  10. Muskrat

    Muskrat Well-Known Member

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    CNC if you're looking for a job in industry. Right now in our town, there are CNC- related openings at the POTW, two automotive parts manufacturers, and two machine installation contractors. Industry is hiring 10 to 1 for CNC over welding, and carpenters aren't even in the mix.

    You should have at least some electives while you're in school. Use those for carpentry and welding, which will stand you in good stead on the homestead. They're also fine if you want to have your own business, or if you want to work construction.

    Depends upon where you're planning to go with this.
     
  11. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ted, My GF is deaf. With this as a consideration, I would say that (sadly) the job with the least amount of communication would be the best choice. Carpentry is an ever changing proposition. Both welding and CNC can be done in a production environment and that is what I would recomend.
     
  12. ricky

    ricky Well-Known Member

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    look at it this way. a machine can weld and a cnc is a machine. but never seen a robot or any kind of a machine build a house
     
  13. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    my old HS shopt teacher always told me "learn gunsmithing and steam engine repair kid, by the time your my age thats all that will be left to use is guns and antique trains."
     
  14. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    Avondale is hiring in New Orleans.

    Union Tank is hiring at its plants down here.

    Both are looking for good welders who can pass a drug test. Money varies from get-by to good.

    The oilfield in the Gulf is still booming...you don't mind working where you can't see land, you could make some serious money burning rods.

    And last, but not least...if the Kuwaitis decide to build the Project Kuwait refinery west of New Orleans, guys are talking about $10,000,000,000 worth of construction jobs, alot of which will be welding.

    Now, having said all that, the HVAC guys don't last a minute down here before they get snapped up - especially the guys who can do the commercial stuff like chillers and evap towers - although light commercial and residential stay plenty busy.
     
  15. brownthumb

    brownthumb Well-Known Member

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    I think you are barking up the wrong tree.
    You sound like a very intelligent person. Don't cut yourself short. Why not consider structural engineering, architecture, or a related field?
     
  16. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    After the plant closed, I chose HVAC for the reasons brought up by pistolsmom.
    Plenty of work from big stuff to residential, to side work.
    Good money.
     
  17. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    Tough choices. Illegal immigrants are taking over the building trades and contractors can pay $5/hour & pocket the difference.
    Of course, if you are skilled, highly motivated and have a good work ethic, you can hang out your own shingle. Then you can compete directly with illegal immigrants willing to work for $5/hour.

    CNC. Another tough call. Jobs are heading off to China quicker than one can say "cheap wages". The future of CNC employment in the US is an unknown.

    Welding. Another occupation being sent to China. Of course there will always be a need for local welders. Hard work. Very few youngsters are interested in taking up the trade.

    There no longer is any certainty when it comes to jobs. Its part & parcel of the "New World Order". US citizens are now competing directly with citizens of India, China and every other country in the world.

    I'd say choose something that you enjoy.
     
  18. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    For a job I would go with CNC machining. A carpenter job is usually low buck, no benefit, only work in good weather, no job security type of job. The only good carpenter job would be a union one and depends on the area. Welding is better than carpentry but not as good as machining as far as a job goes.
    Now if you're weighing this out for owning your own business all of that changes.
     
  19. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    HORTICULTURE!!!!! I've taken alot of classes over the years, welding, automotive, HVAC, but one I've missed is horticulture. Check with local Vo-Tech schools and if nothing is available take your state's Master Gardening program, I learned alot in MG.
     
  20. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Something I left out of my post.
    Costs of driving are not going to go down and definetly will go up in the mear future. Welding and carpentry are generally travel to jobs that you have to move with the job. CNC machining obviously would be done in one place.