Which breed

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by cdann40, Oct 31, 2006.

  1. cdann40

    cdann40 Member

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    Hello
    I'm going to be sarting a farm next year and I was wondering if any one knows how to gage the market to see which breed would be the best, I'm leaning towards longhorns, but I don't know if nw Pa would be a good money maker. What does everyone think is the breed that someone can make a living off of? Thanks

    Chris
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    A lot is going to depend on what your market is. Are you planning to raise grass-fed, and direct market your steers to the consumer? Are you wanting to have a cow-calf operation, and sell stocker cattle? Do you want to grain finish your own steers and sell at the auction?

    If you're going to grass feed and direct market, the longhorns might work. They're naturally lean, but they grow off much slower than the European breeds. This can work, but will require diligence on your part to develop your market. There is also a little bit of a novelty market for purebred stock in Longhorns, but this is a difficult market for a novice to break into.

    If you're going to raise stockers or finish your own to sell wholesale, the market is paying a premium for black cattle right now. The Angus Association has done a good job of marketing the Angus name, and the buyers want black. The profit can be smaller selling this way, but is usually a simpler method of marketing, especially for someone just getting into cattle. Do all the research you can to determine what you want to do, and what type of cattle you want to raise.
     

  3. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Good insights from Tyusclan. If you wish to have a for - profit venture, the safest strategy would be Angus, Hereford, or crosses of the two.
     
  4. cdann40

    cdann40 Member

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    I just spoke with county extension folk and he said that longhorn are usually for hobby but if I could start a market, good for me. The more conservative/stable market would be to go with Angus, but I'll look foward to more advice from everybody adn keep at my research. Thanks for the advice so far

    Chris
     
  5. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    They're not necessarily a "hobby". I have a friend here who has a large herd of longhorns, and he does very well with them. BUT, he has raised them for years, he shows all over the country, and has had the world champion a couple of times. It takes years to get a herd like this to the point it's profitable.
     
  6. vallyfarm

    vallyfarm Well-Known Member

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    We've raised beefers all my life, and i can tell you that there is only one type of cow to get...what ever one YOU want to raise. Angus will most likley give you the best return if you sell them at the auction barn, but can be a REAL big handfull, some people are OK with that, but I've personally NEVER seen a frendly Angus. Herfords will most likley give you the least problems, be it fences, calving, vet bills, etc. but won't do nearly as well at the sale barn. If you are wanting to grow your own market, go grass fed, and sell it from your home, Devons are the best tasting meat I've ever had. I've eaten everything from bear to horse to dog, and almost every breed of cow there is, and honestly, nothing comes even close to a grass fed Devon. We've had a waiting list for our cows of people waiting to get our meat (we only butcher 6-7 cows/year at most ) from before I was born (40 yrs) when my father was doing it all himself. We called through the list last year, and those that are still with us STILL are willing to wait! Now that isn't marketing or B.S. or any gimmic, that is just people trying our beef and knowing what good is all about. They are a little pricy to start with, and can cross with a herford bull just fine, but in the end, get the cow that keeps YOU happy to head to the barn every day. Mike
     
  7. cdann40

    cdann40 Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I think we may get 2-3. Raise them stick one in the freezer and see if we can make any money off of them, if it was enjoable or a pain in the -----. And then go from there. At this point we are rather flexible. I'm trying to do research on as much as I can and figure out what would be the best for us. I know I'm not going to get rich but I would like to do this for a living eventually, so I'm willing to put time into it. So any suggestions at all are great