Which Breed or Cross breed

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by DMC_OH, Oct 20, 2005.

  1. DMC_OH

    DMC_OH Well-Known Member

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    Hi Everyone,
    I am wanting opinions on which breed or cross breed would be a good investment for wool and meat. Also something that is an easy keeper. I am not sure about showing as that is not the top of my list of things to do with sheep. Maybe a good breed for 4-h when my kids get older.
    Also some pros and cons about having sheep would be nice too. I would like to Thanks You in Advanced for any in put. DMC_OH
     
  2. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pros: they mow your lawn with a good attitude
    they also grow wool
    they don't get as big as cows
    they are tastey

    Cons: they are real live beings and need to be taken care of
    lambs die
     

  3. seymojo536

    seymojo536 Well-Known Member

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    Why, Shetlands of course. Good mothers, great wool, easy keepers, 4 of them will thrive on an acre of pasture. Not that I'm prejudice or anything.
     
  4. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    And you generally don't have to dock the tails...:)
     
  5. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and another pro: They're quieter than goats! :-D

    Con: You have to buy a shear or have them sheared.


    My Shetland ram this time is very docile, wouldn't think about hittin ya even when I mess with my ewes. And I only have two ewes, not like I have a whole flock...lol. My last ram was okay w/ people, but when it came to that barn wall...boy that wall had to die! LOL He'd take out ALL his frustration on that wall. My one Shetland ewe developed small horns, but she loves 'em, cuz she can itch her back with 'em! LOL.
     
  6. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you think that at A future date you might have them shown. You should talk to A 4-H or A FFA advisor and see what is popular in your area and then that should help you make A choice. You have many options to think of.
     
  7. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have and really like California Red Sheep. Being a true breeding cross of Tunis and Barbado, they are easy to keep in the southern warmer climates and the rams are fertile regardless of temperatures. This allows them to breed in any month and allows at least 3 lambings in a 2 year period. 50% increase in breeding leads to additional $$$$ worth of lambs to sell. Good meat and wool breed.

    BTW, plan on getting good fences and a Livestock Guarding dog (we raise anatolians) BEFORE you put sheep in the pasture. Nothing is more disheartening than seeing your sheep investment killed by maurading dogs or Coyotes - and without protection it will happen......
     
  8. DMC_OH

    DMC_OH Well-Known Member

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    I know how to shear and do my own with my angora goats so that is not a con for me
    . I have thought about Romney, Rambouillet, CVM are just to name a few.
    I will have a talk with the 4-H director and find out what is what too.
    This is another question I have tossed aorund for a while. Which would be perffered as a gaurdian. LLama, dogs, donkeys, something else not listed. Why? I really like the imput from everyone and thanks for it. Thanks, DMC_OH
     
  9. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    Well...IMHO...Dogs can be trained to protect the flock...Llamas have the 3 Fs...Fight, Flight or Freeze. So you've got a 1 in 3 chance of having a good guardian. I've never seen a guardian donkey in action, so I don't know for sure. I've heard of donkeys and llamas killing baby sheep/goats in the field becuase they were "intruding" too...But it's all up to you. Llamas will yield you more fiber to work with as well ;-) Just remember, geld the llamas and donkeys if you get males :)
     
  10. DMC_OH

    DMC_OH Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I think the dogs will be the way to go then. :)
     
  11. eieiomom

    eieiomom Well-Known Member

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    Lincoln Longwool sheep (& crosses) are excellent for their fiber, meat and are gentle giants.
    They are very easy keepers and excellent dual purpose sheep.
    I have sent you a pm regarding more specifics.
     
  12. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We have 2 Dorper/Katahdin ram lambs and one St. Croix/Painted Desert ewe lamb. So far the boys are very easy keepers and the ewe is too. We will see as time goes by if we like them or not. So far, so good. The ewe is very scared but getting better. The boys were bottle babies from a few days old to 4 months and are a dream to be around. My Aussie is getting practice herding them all too.
     
  13. redroving

    redroving Well-Known Member

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    Howdy, can you PM me or email me? I would like to know more about your reds.