Where to put a wood cook stove??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by tiffer, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. tiffer

    tiffer Member

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    I've been researching wood cook stoves. When we built our house, I didn't even think of buying one of these. Well, now that we've started gardening, I'm wanting to can and have found out that I CAN'T on my glass top stove...ugh!!!

    So now I'm contemplating a wood stove. Can I just put it right where my other stove is (aside from the "installation" of the pipe etc...). Or do they have to be a certain distance from the wall and wood cabinets?

    My space is VERY limited in the kitchen.

    What have any of you done?
     
  2. MikeJoel

    MikeJoel Well-Known Member

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    Strange... My mom cans on her glass top stove. I personally know nothing beyond watching my mom can, but I know she does it on her GE radiant glass top stove.

    Mike
     

  3. tiffer

    tiffer Member

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    well supposedly it has to do w/ the weight of your pot and the number of cans. Tonight I was in a store and was going to purchase a water bath canner and on the label it said not to use on glass top stoves.

    I wonder if your mom uses a small pan (my grandma used a huge old pressure cooker on her regular stove.)
     
  4. MikeJoel

    MikeJoel Well-Known Member

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    I'll ask her tomorrow....

    If I remember right though she uses a pretty large pressure canner. It is pretty old so it didn't know about glass tops :)

    She has had the stove while and never had trouble canning on it, but maybe she is blessed.

    I would suspect they are warning because they figure that much weight could crack the glass. They also warn not to drop things on them I know.

    From memory I believe she usually has that big metal pressure canner filled with water has about 6 jars in it. So it must be pretty big?

    I'll ask.
     
  5. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd get rid of the glass top stove. There is no way I'd stand next to a wood cook stove canning on a hot summer day.

    Dont get me wrong I love my wood cook stove, just not when its summer time.

    Mrs Whodunit
     
  6. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I have a woo cook stove in my kitchen, and I use it. but right across from it, in my island, I have a gas stove. in the summer, i can on the gas stove, with the air conditioning on full blast.
    now, I would use a wood stove, for the winter months, but in the summer, your house will get very hot. I would get rid of the glass top job, and get a real working gas stove , that you can can on . the older the better, as long as it is in good shape. the older ones are heavier, and not tinny, so they hold canners just fine. I run 3 and 4 pressure canners at once.
    I can everything. I cook on my wood stove all fall winter and spring. and love it. it is wonderful. Heats up my big old kitchen just fine also.
    SO you might want to think about it.
     
  7. ibcnya

    ibcnya Well-Known Member

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    Do you have some kind of an outbuilding? If you do, get yourself one of them big cast iron burners and a 40 gal propane tank on a regulator and can outside. The secret in the summertime is to keep every BTU possible from entering the house. Unless of course you like to turn up your A.C. and rack up the KW's. They use to be called summer kitchens and were usually the add-on to a farm house.
     
  8. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I remember my great grandparents moving the wood cook stove outside for the summer and canning out there. As long as you can rig up a chimney of some sort, why wouldn't that work?

    Then you can move it back inside in the fall where it can help heat your house. Or move the cookstove into a shed to keep it out of the weather.
     
  9. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Have anyone tried canning outside in one of those turkey fryers?
     
  10. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    Minninkin,
    that's how I can, on the turkey fryer right outside on my deck.Nothing like sittin' on the deck in the shade while you are canning! I bought it just for that purpose, it's small enough to move around also, I've done Maple syrup on it to!
    Down side is that you can only have one canner going, but I've only got one so it's fine by me. Kitchen stays cool and I just have to carry jars inside. It's the way to go.

    Carol K
     
  11. RenieB

    RenieB Well-Known Member

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    We also have a cereamic top stove and I do not can on it. We also have an old small 3 burner gas stove dated 1926. It does have to be lit by a match so there is no waste of gas. This is where I can and it works well. We have a good size kitchen with an island and we have three stoves in. The new ceramic, the little gas stove and a Vermont Castings wood stove. I prefer gas for cooking but purchased the new stove for the ease of cleaning it. The old gas stove is a chore to clean but it comes in handy for canning and when we lose power (which is often around here). I just wouldn't think on a ceremic stove the temperature could be adjusted for canning and when I bought the stove they advised against using it to can. When we built this house 25 yrs ago we were living in a mobile home with a very small kitchen and I insisted this house have a decent size kitchen so I have the room for these stoves. Everyone wants my gas stove and I just keep telling them it isn't for sale

    RenieB
     
  12. MikeJoel

    MikeJoel Well-Known Member

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    Well as I thought.
    My mom uses a pressure cooker (large) on her glass top stove.
    She hasn't had any problems. She uses an old pressure cooker. It has a flat bottom (outside cooking area). I think it holds 6 or 7 jars at once.


    We are getting ready to start a homestead (if God allows) and plan to use a wood cook stove. We plan to build a summer kitchen and move the stove out to it during the summers.

    Mike
     
  13. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We use a small portable camp stove outside on the back deck -- for the pressure-canner, which needs an even temperature for up to one-hour, depending on what we can. We move it inside, if it's too cool, or it's windy. Our old one was white-gas, now we have a propane one -- uses those small bottles of propane -- not real organic -- but canning is an important job which must be done carefully, and this helps -- a lot.

    And we use the wood cookstove inside for canning water-bath items, often at the same time we use the pressure-canner.

    Alex & (mostly) Nancy



    And, to answer your question, "Where should I put my wood cookstove?" Well, in the Kitchen, I guess; though they are so nice they could go in the Living Room or even the Bedroom: not the Bathroom though, if you have one.

    This is Katie II, we put her in the Kitchen, Dinning Room, and Living Room -- because our place is all together on the First Floor,

    [​IMG]
    "Katie II"-The-Cookstove, 1934 Facwett $87.50 USD at Garage Sale, Note Lifting Lever At Left of Cook Top, Grilling Veggies

    This is where she is in the Kitchen, sort of,

    [​IMG]
    This is Where She Is. We switched Ashely and Pellet Stove location, and Ashely recently became Blaze King.

    Good Luck,

    Alex
     
  14. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    I've canned on a glass-top stove, also, without any problems, but it probably isn't a very good idea. It would be easy to break the top. My grandmother had one of the first glass-top stoves to come out (it may have actually been ceramic -- I remember it had a white top), and her top cracked and had to be replaced.

    Wood stoves do need to have some clearance around them -- you don't want to burn your house down! Check with the stove manufacturers for clearances for their stoves. They will vary, as different stoves are constructed differently. If you don't care about having an oven, and just plan on cooking on the top, you might look for a small flat-topped stove rated for mobile home installation, as they don't need much clearance around them.

    Kathleen
     
  15. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A lot of the new stoves recommend not canning on them. Read the materials that come with the unit and/or check with the company. Sales people have no clue.
     
  16. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Personally, I hate my glasstop stove. Hubby had to have it. Tried to talk him out of it when I found out you weren't supposed to use cast iron skillets on it. Did not know about the no-canning thing. GREAT...another reason to hate this thing and it's only a year old.

    My sister is selling her woodstove since she's decided they'll never get it installed in their house. I'm thinking of buying it and installing it in the garage.
     
  17. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Modern woodstoves should have an Owners manual that provides the required setback distances. In addtion, all modern wood buring appliances have a metal label that also provides the setback distances. In the absence of these, (owners manual or appliance label), the required setback to combustibles is 36 inches.
     
  18. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    tiffer,

    To go back to the original questions you asked, I would venture that most likely you will have trouble placing a wood cookstove in the same place as your current, I assume electric, glass top stove. The reason is simply that cookstoves require a minimum clearance to combustibles, here in Calif., that generally is 18-24 inches. And even fire rated sheet rock is considered combustible if laid on over wood studs.

    There is a way around this, however, but it requires some minor remodelling. The way around is to build an air gap firewall. Starting with a sheetrock wall, simply furr out over each stud with two thickenesses of sheet rock creating the air gap. Then when you lay up the 5/8 inch fire rock leave a 1 inch gap at bottom and at top so the heat will vent. Extend this to the ceiling and no problem with the single wall stovepipe. At the ceiling transition to insulated chimney (which requires 1 inch clearance to combustibles.) Cold air gets drawn in at the bottom of the air gap wall and warm air vents at the top. The result is the top layer of sheetrock gets very warm, even hot, but the underlaying layer of sheetrock stays cool to the touch at all times. My own installation of a Pioneer Maid stove also made the air gap continuous under the stove as well as behind it. This system makes you fire proof and safe and keeps the inspectors at bay.

    Another consideration if you are moving to a wood stove is the water heat exchanger coil for the firebox. It can save you a bunch on money for hot water. Many considerations into whether that could work for you, however.

    Others here have suggested the outdoor canning kitchen concept which I can also highly recommend. One person suggested simply moving the stove outside in the spring so you don't overheat the house in summer canning time. The problem with that is the difficulty of moving a 600 lb stove for three or four months! If you make the summer canning kitchen an attached add on to your house, you can likely simply open windows and vent some of the hot air into the house. And especially if you use one of the Stirling Cycle stovetop fans.

    My own climate here in Calif is hot summers when I don't use the cookstove and mild winters when it is alsways on 24 hours a day. Summer temps 100F and winter temps in 20's and 30's. Love that Pioneer Maid!!!!

    bearkiller
     
  19. MikeJoel

    MikeJoel Well-Known Member

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    My mom uses cast iron on her glass top too. I have cooked on it with cast iron and normal metal pans and it works great.

    Mike
     
  20. tiffer

    tiffer Member

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    Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!! All the posts are wonderful! I've got some really great ideas. I never really thought about canning outside. We have a turkey fryer and camp propane stoves. I also was thinking that I had to put the wood cook stove against a wall, but after looking at Alex's pics, I think I could make this work in my kitchen.

    I've never posted here before....always just read....I was shocked by the number of posts. Thanks for your time.

    I have one more question, but I think I'll post another thread.

    Tiffer