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I am in this same scenario of hunting land. So any advice I offer is limited in its quality. However, what I have found is that starting with a list of parameters is a good idea. What are you wanting from it? What do you want to do? How are you making money? Who do you want to be around? Do you want to be around anyone? Is there water? How much would it cost to drill? What's their income tax? More importantly, what's their property tax? What sort of codes and regulations do I or do I not want? What's the states standpoint on gun rights? How long is the growing season?, etc etc etc. Make a list.

Next, I start looking at various overlay maps. Light pollution maps, hydrologic maps, topographic, oil drilling/nat gas/coal operations, nuclear plants, forest cover, and so on. I have saved a lot of images of maps.

After that, yep - I second the landandfarm mention. You can set your price per acre and all that. It's been useful.

I use the website Landandfarm.com https://www.landandfarm.com/search/North-Carolina/Ranches-for-sale/ to look through what is available in a certain area. There are many filters to screen out the possabilities.
 

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REMEMBER . If it sounds too good to be true,,it probably is !

I used to see ads in the back of magazines for cheap land out west, & thought about moving out there. I talked to my uncle, who had traveled extensively throughout the country. He was a land procurement agent for the government. I asked him about the dirt cheap land out west & he said, " Sure, there is some very cheap land out there, but the reason it was so cheap, was that it wasn't worth a S*** !"
 

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There is a ton of that. I definitely recommend setting a minimum price as well. To help bypass some of that nonsense. There are certainly oases out west. Spots with good soil and good water. They are rare though. Particularly along the rockies. It is devastatingly beautiful but there is a reason people settled in the valleys near the water. And, as Esteban said, there is a reason that land is cheap. It is doable but one has to rethink costs. A well is probably much more expensive and there isn't likely to be a spring or anything. Unless you jump up the price about 100k. So a real deep well is probably a necessity. Which itself is probably up to 30k. About as much as a 10kW solar array (the average consumption of an american home). Growing season is short and the soil isn't very good. So you'll have to build greenhouses/polytunnels/etc. and probably have to bring in soil and compost and everything at first. If you want livestock, that's another load of water procurement. You'll probably need water catchment but I assume that is already part of the plan. You won't be able to procure timber resources from the land for building so much probably. So, most likely would be looking at more of a sandbag/adobe/earthship sort of home. More imported materials.

Basically, start up for infrastructure is going to be a lot more for most of the rockies and the southwest. But the land is dirt cheap. Traditional farming is pretty out of the question for much of it though. Especially in the high desert mesas. Again, it is definitely doable. It is just a trade off.

We have started looking mostly in Vermont and Arkansas. Timber and easily accessible water resources are important to us. I am still searching for my New Mexico oasis though. It's just been deprioritized in favor of lumber and springs.
REMEMBER . If it sounds too good to be true,,it probably is !

I used to see ads in the back of magazines for cheap land out west, & thought about moving out there. I talked to my uncle, who had traveled extensively throughout the country. He was a land procurement agent for the government. I asked him about the dirt cheap land out west & he said, " Sure, there is some very cheap land out there, but the reason it was so cheap, was that it wasn't worth a S*** !"
 

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*addendum

If one really wanted to head west, I'd recommend pinpointing certain counties and then checking out their delinquent tax records. There are a lot of ranches scattered throughout the west that have fallen behind on their property taxes for x or y reason and usually, they will be selling off some of their land to cover the cost. It's mind numbing digging through tax records but it does yield some good results sometimes.
There is a ton of that. I definitely recommend setting a minimum price as well. To help bypass some of that nonsense. There are certainly oases out west. Spots with good soil and good water. They are rare though. Particularly along the rockies. It is devastatingly beautiful but there is a reason people settled in the valleys near the water. And, as Esteban said, there is a reason that land is cheap. It is doable but one has to rethink costs. A well is probably much more expensive and there isn't likely to be a spring or anything. Unless you jump up the price about 100k. So a real deep well is probably a necessity. Which itself is probably up to 30k. About as much as a 10kW solar array (the average consumption of an american home). Growing season is short and the soil isn't very good. So you'll have to build greenhouses/polytunnels/etc. and probably have to bring in soil and compost and everything at first. If you want livestock, that's another load of water procurement. You'll probably need water catchment but I assume that is already part of the plan. You won't be able to procure timber resources from the land for building so much probably. So, most likely would be looking at more of a sandbag/adobe/earthship sort of home. More imported materials.

Basically, start up for infrastructure is going to be a lot more for most of the rockies and the southwest. But the land is dirt cheap. Traditional farming is pretty out of the question for much of it though. Especially in the high desert mesas. Again, it is definitely doable. It is just a trade off.

We have started looking mostly in Vermont and Arkansas. Timber and easily accessible water resources are important to us. I am still searching for my New Mexico oasis though. It's just been deprioritized in favor of lumber and springs.
 

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PnB Elko county Nevada has a yearly tax sale contact the courthouse to be added to the invite list. It was cancelled this year due to covid.
 
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