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Im really wanting to start a homestead as soon as possible, I currently live with my parents in Massachusetts.. i was renting an apartment last year but my husband lost his job, so we had to move in with them to save money, which we have done and have a little bit saved up. I would prefer to move to the Carolina's or Appalachia area as land is much cheaper out there! I just dont know how to go about finding a spot, being so far away and all. Any advice on buying out of state would be much appreciated..
Thanks
 

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You might try in your area first with the search engines such as Unitedcountry.com or Zillow. You might not find the homestead that you have in mind, but it can point out local areas you might want to check out.

Or, since Massachusetts is so very heavily populated, it might help you to find a parcel of land that is close enough to your family so that you can pay the odd visit to your loved ones
 

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I wouldn't recommend buying sight unseen. There are so many variables for things that just won't work for you.

Moving to the mountains you have to know what you're moving to. Rocky ground can be very prevalent and not plantable. Areas of the property too steep to use. Since there are not any real building codes in many of those areas you could end up with adjoining property that is not preferable.

We made a couple of trips from our home in one state to the area that is now called home before finding the right place. Most of what we looked at had serious structural issues with the homes. Had problems with the roads, if it rained they became impassable. Most real estate agents are not aware of these shortcomings.

After touring a house with obvious mold issues, another with floors like waves in the ocean our real estate agent volunteered to pre visit anything that was lookable before we came down. She found us this place. But they have to be very attuned to what your need is. And understand how the land itself will work.
 

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First off you have to decide what you wanna do on that Homestead not all land is suitable for everything
You’re going to have a hard time growing maple trees and cranberries in South Texas
Palm trees And citrus or a real chore to raise in Maine.
If I was you I might take a look for property up in Maine. I understand it is somewhat reasonable and probably much more like you are used to
 

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Have sincere discussions about what you want to do with a homestead. Garden? Fruit trees? Goats?
Make a list of attributes that are absolutely essential. Geographic area? Climate? Terrain? Rainfall? Near enough to a hospital?
Take pictures of places that catch your eye. Figure out why you like that place.
Keep a notebook. Lists, ideas, pictures, maps.

Look at https://www.forsalebyowner.com/homes-for-sale/

Travel.
 
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Finding a piece of ground to buy is easy. Just get on the internet and start doing searches "land for sale" or "farms for sale" and you can find thousands of parcels for sale. What's tough is finding the "right piece of ground", in an area where you want to be, with everything you want on the place, and within your budget constraints.

You need to spend some time in an area first to see if you like it and to get a feel for how things work. Then get your financing set up or have cash on hand so you can jump on it when the right piece becomes available.

I've got ground in Indiana, Michigan and Illinois, it's really not all that tough to find something.
 

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You really need to see before you buy anything. We are in the process of moving from Northern Minnesota back to either TN or KY where my husband's business has multi-year contracts. I've been down there 3 times so far and have looked at a lot of land and/or homes on acreage. It's really hard to get a feel for property unless you actually walk it. Realtors show only the best photos online. ;)
 

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You really need to see before you buy anything. We are in the process of moving from Northern Minnesota back to either TN or KY where my husband's business has multi-year contracts. I've been down there 3 times so far and have looked at a lot of land and/or homes on acreage. It's really hard to get a feel for property unless you actually walk it. Realtors show only the best photos online. ;)
And most have never seen the property. That's why we saw the moldy house, it was listed by another agency. Same for the two houses we saw with wavy floors.
 

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Actually, I think you've put the cart before the horse. Job hunting comes first. Somehow you've gotta pay for the homestead, critters, critter and people food, vet bills, tractor - maintenance - it really never stops.
Look for jobs you are both qualified for. See if any are in rural areas. Then house/land hunt. You don't want to drive over an hour each way to work. It cuts into your homesteading day. And few people can pay their way just homesteading. Especially starting out.
 

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Land in northwest West Virginia is cheap, especially if you can afford to buy at least 30 acres of it. We paid $138,500 for a small 100 year old farmhouse on 50 acres of land: 40 acres of hilly woods and 10 acres of grass bordering a big creek. We found it on Zillow, went and looked at it, then bought it 4 days after the initial listing. Very little jobs in the area (we are both retired on social security). Gas field workers, auto repair techs, nurses, Walmart, beef steer farming, and conveniece store clerks are about it. If you can fit in with those job limitations and have at least 100k to play with, go for it...
 

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Google Earth can be your friend. When we were looking on-line we could get an aerial view, but I think what was just as important (to us, anyhow) is we could take a virtual drive-by. Tennessee has it's share of trash heaps and we could check out the immediate neighborhood. If we saw an interesting listing, I'd find the address, get the rough layout from the tax maps and take the Google drive. Rejected a bunch of places.

Also, we could not find an agent that would work with us until we found the property we wanted ourselves. During a couple of years of looking, from out of state, we probably met with five agents who said they would look for us, and we never got a call.
 

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I think you're on the right track. Brain storm to determine what you both want. Be realistic about your abilities. Any skills you'll need can be learned. As others have already stated, you'll probably have to both work. Children need a good education which might mean home schooling. And don't worry about making mistakes. You'll make them. We all have.

Take your time, do your research (which you're doing now), ask questions and visit a few places on a long weekend or vacation. Just my opinion. Best of luck to you.
 

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Google Earth can be your friend. When we were looking on-line we could get an aerial view, but I think what was just as important (to us, anyhow) is we could take a virtual drive-by. Tennessee has it's share of trash heaps and we could check out the immediate neighborhood. If we saw an interesting listing, I'd find the address, get the rough layout from the tax maps and take the Google drive. Rejected a bunch of places.

Also, we could not find an agent that would work with us until we found the property we wanted ourselves. During a couple of years of looking, from out of state, we probably met with five agents who said they would look for us, and we never got a call.
May I ask where did you relocate from? I've thought of some parts of the south, but I'm a spoiled northwesterner and the weather change makes me nervous. Lol
 

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May I ask where did you relocate from? I've thought of some parts of the south, but I'm a spoiled northwesterner and the weather change makes me nervous. Lol
You didn't ask me but I grew up in MI. Not dealing with super cold and snow at every turn is heaven.
 

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Google Earth can be your friend. When we were looking on-line we could get an aerial view, but I think what was just as important (to us, anyhow) is we could take a virtual drive-by. Tennessee has it's share of trash heaps and we could check out the immediate neighborhood. If we saw an interesting listing, I'd find the address, get the rough layout from the tax maps and take the Google drive. Rejected a bunch of places.

Also, we could not find an agent that would work with us until we found the property we wanted ourselves. During a couple of years of looking, from out of state, we probably met with five agents who said they would look for us, and we never got a call.
Our daughter saw a house on 7 acres once that looked gorgeous, backed up to timber and the price was right. My son in law used google earth and found that just behind and to the side, in those woods, was what looked like the crash of a 747. The debris field belonged to the property next to them. Trash fires, junk cars, boats school buses, rvs, etc. Google earth saved the day.
 

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Our daughter saw a house on 7 acres once that looked gorgeous, backed up to timber and the price was right. My son in law used google earth and found that just behind and to the side, in those woods, was what looked like the crash of a 747. The debris field belonged to the property next to them. Trash fires, junk cars, boats school buses, rvs, etc. Google earth saved the day.
Yep, we almost didn't buy this place because there was an old house and a single wide across the road. But from the aerial photos the property was neat as a pin.

We took a chance and looked at this house. The people across the road turned out to be some the best people to have living nearby.
 

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Im really wanting to start a homestead as soon as possible, I currently live with my parents in Massachusetts.. i was renting an apartment last year but my husband lost his job, so we had to move in with them to save money, which we have done and have a little bit saved up. I would prefer to move to the Carolina's or Appalachia area as land is much cheaper out there! I just dont know how to go about finding a spot, being so far away and all. Any advice on buying out of state would be much appreciated..
Thanks
You might consider my Homesteader Start-Up offer! I am in Southeast Texas where the growing season is year round due to temperatures, rainfall and fertile soil. I have a 7 acre property that I used to homestead. It has a 6000 sf barn, livestock pens, outbuildings, pecan grove, pear & fig trees. It is fenced, cross fenced, gated and sits in a private location at the end of a county road.

I am looking for someone to occupy it, run a little homestead and help me out /co-op with my current homestead which is about 15-20 miles away. You would have to put a little temporary dwelling on it, but I can help you there, as well. There are utilities to connect with, already in place. Your monthly expense would be taxes and liability insurance, plus your living expenses. What I want in return is a homesteading partner, someone to live on and maintain the property and some handyman/ranch hand help at my place. I am a single widow in my 60’s and can’t keep up with both properties, so I am offering this to some young family that wants to get started, is willing to work, but doesn’t have the capital to get into a place. If you are interested, just let me know and we can continue the discussion.

Purchase is an option. We can discuss terms and have an attorney draw up the agreement to protect the interests of all parties.

If anyone else reading this is interested, this offer is open to any young, aspiring homesteading family!
 
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