Where to by wire and how much $$$$$

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by okiemom, Feb 17, 2005.

  1. okiemom

    okiemom Well-Known Member

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    Where can I by wire? Is it only available on the net? Can hardwire cloth be substituted in some situations? I am wanting some wire in Oklahoma. How much will it cost and what sizes do the rolls come in? Thanks Katharine
     
  2. Runners

    Runners A real Quack!

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    http://www.klubertanz.com/

    The best place for wire. They carry 3 grades, cheap to best stuff. They have 3 grades, which varies in construction, stiffness, coating(s) and thickness. We've purchased LOTS of their wire for bunny cages, duck houses, you name it.

    100' rolls is common and most ecenomical. Shipping is $$ and prices have varied greatly because of the Chinese buying up all the steel - prices change all the time.

    If you make 30" cages, buy 36" widths for the floors (1/2"x1") and fold the edges up 3" on each side... makes a stronger, stiffer floor. 16 gauge is OK, 14 gauge is more difficult to work with, BUT it doesn't sag, espically when you make multiple cages as a single unit. (separate the cages with wire V or U shaped hay feeders).

    Hardware cloth is basically useless without wood or metal reinforcing - it only took one experience using this light 20 gauge stuff for us to realize WHY none of the commercial rabbitries don't use it.

    Learn from others that raise rabbits, espically those that do it commercially, they're the ones that squeeze every penny out of facilities and waste nothing. If they ain't doing something, there's usually a good reason why.
     

  3. DMC_OH

    DMC_OH Well-Known Member

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    I also agree with Runners. It is at the very least worth a phone call to them (first time placing orders with them you need to call). They also have the tools you may need to build your own cages. Dropping pans health care books ect.....
     
  4. pjd

    pjd Well-Known Member

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    Atwood's on Claremore has the 1/2" square hardware cloth for $52.00 for 36" x 50' roll. I have not tried Tulsa but in Pryor all I could get was by the foot at one hardware store at it came out to be $75.00 for 36" x 50'. A lot of places that used to carry it have quit. I used to order the 48" x 100' rolls at Mazie lumber but even they have quit carrying it. If you call around you have to ask for hardware cloth because they don't know rabbit wire. Orschelns doesn't carry it. If you find a better deal up your way or in Tulsa, let me know. I use the hardware cloth for chickens too, coons can't stick their hands through it! I did have them rip a corner loose though.
     
  5. nans31

    nans31 Well-Known Member

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    I bought wire last April for cages. I looked at online at the places that sold wire, and OUCH! I finally called a local guy that makes cages and asked where he gets his wire. So, I got mine there. It's called Oregon Wire, in Portland, Or. This was my cost, but I know wire costs are going up. 1/2x1 16 g 36wx 100 ft long 117.25 each. 2x1 14g 36w x 100 long 71.55 each.
    nan
     
  6. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Unless you already have a very good and comfortable pair of wire cutters, gloves, a very good and comfortable ringer tool, and you are pretty handy at building with wire, it makes more sense to buy the cages already made. Just telling you this from my personal experience. A comfortable pair of wire cutters cost me about $75, because the economy one made my hands ache cutting just one floor. The economy ringer tool was a hassle so I purchased a better one for $100. The savings is not there when you figure in tools and time, unless you will be building cages for ten years. I'm saying this as someone who got all scratched up :) I bought a sizable quantity of Bass cages- shipping was very low (like $25 for $1200 in cages). It takes fifteen minutes to put together and the edges are all child-proof. Add up everything you need to build your own (wire, rings, tools, door frames, etc.) and look at what the same number of cages will cost you to buy ready-made. Then look at the time and hassle you will save. Some people can make it work but some will be much happier buying a ready made cage.
     
  7. nans31

    nans31 Well-Known Member

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    Tango-- I'd agree with you... we didn't build right,or cut right really and I get scratched all the time by the sharp edges on the cages! Ouch!! We are now grinding the sharp edges, or putting thick wire along the door openings. We put together 144 cages in 2 weeks and our hands were killing us!!!!!! But, never couldv'e afforded to buy whole cages so I'd still do it this way, just smarter.
     
  8. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I used to buy the 1/4" mesh to make my own baitfish minnow traps. They were far superior and trapped lots more minnows than the store bought ones that were much smaller. I also built a small flight pen and some other smaller animal cages in the past pretty cheap. I always bought the wire and fittings, clamps, etc. at the local farm supply.
    The advantage is that you can build to suit your measurements or custom requirments. For example, I could never buy the minnow traps like the ones I put together, so making them was the way to go for me. Yes, wear rawhide gloves, preferrably with gauntlets to keep from getting scratched up.
     
  9. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    Cage wire is expensive and hard too find, but it really lasts 4-ever. Our cages are 10 yrs old and still look new, those are the ones I built, the ones I bought as fox cages for $40 for 3 holes they still look good and I've had them since '91 and they were old when I bought them, and I have two really old cages I got out of an OLD homesteaders barn that a tornado tore down. bent em back into shape, and they do look old, but still work Great!
     
  10. nans31

    nans31 Well-Known Member

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    One thing we did that probably really helped was to use an air cutter (not sure what it's called actually--- was hooked up to the air compressor) and it cut through the wire quite nicely! We didn't really get cut up while making the cages. I get cut on the cut cage door openings. Some used cages I've bought has the wire cut longer and then bent back. That's a nifty idea! Unfortunately I'd gone through and cut the holes in all 144 cages before noticing that trick!
     
  11. pjd

    pjd Well-Known Member

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    My husband has some are cutters he used to cut 20 gauge steel and I am going to try them on the cages. What do you mean by folding back the edges? Are there any other things you can think of that may be helpful? I am getting ready to build a variety of cages this spring and I can use all the help I can get. Thanks again and in advance.

    Phyllis
     
  12. Runners

    Runners A real Quack!

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    We fold the bottom wire edges 90 degrees to form kit proof sides 3" high it makes for a nice rigid cage bottom that keeps it's shape, regardless of how big or long the cage is. Anytime you can use a single piece of wire, and fold it 90 degrees, it takes less time, has few sharp edges and uses fewer J hooks. Buying "kit guard" wire is unnecessary.

    If making cages leaves all kinds of cuts from sharp edges, it begs the question, 'what happens to the bunnies that live in them?' Keep the wire cutting to the bare minimum, it'll save you time, money, labor and the cages will last longer!

    The sides of the cages have just 2 cut edges, which are joined together to form a single joint on the back of the cage. In the case of a long multiple cage, 5-6 unit, we'll use a single piece of 1x2 wire, 36' long, fold one edge 3" and then 4 folds to form each corner. A single joint on an end is all there is to the sides. Folding the top edge to stiffen up the sides makes a really rigid & stable unit that doesn't squeek and rock all over the place like a loose or worn out chair.

    The ONLY J clips we use are stainless steel. We end up with a single verticle joint, a bottom edge joint that is overlapping the side to the folded up bottom piece and the top door hinge.

    When done, this light weight & strong cage can easily be supported by 4 wires without flexing & twisting, sagging, creaking & squeaking. If my 15 year old daughter can make these cages... well... I suppose she's rather exceptional, eh? :haha:

    Obviously, there is no wood or extra support involved in these.

    When we make the next set of cages, we'll have to take pics of how we do it.