Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, my name is Seth Perez.
I recently moved to a new place, with a small remaining garden to plant some more agricultural crops, but due to my lack of experience, I wanted to ask people what crops to grow and what tools were needed. buy . Please give more 'ideas to create your own garden.
Sincerely thank you for your sharing. It will give me more ideas to choose from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,914 Posts
Hi, Seth...Welcome to the forum.
It depends on what your intentions are and what sort of land you have to deal with.

If you live near Phoenix, you may need a high powered rock drill & dynamite, for instance.

An herb garden may only need hand tools & containers. Long handle tools like shovel, rake, hoe, digging fork may be needed to grow potatoes, peas, carrots, sweet corn, beans...A lot depends on your tastes and needs.. and climate.... The farther North you live, the shorter the growing season...maybe not long enough for some plants.

Powered implements, like a roto-tiller, may be desirable if your plot exceeds a few dozen sq ft-- I highly recommend electric powered for those things you only use for a short time each year.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, Seth...Welcome to the forum.
It depends on what your intentions are and what sort of land you have to deal with.

If you live near Phoenix, you may need a high powered rock drill & dynamite, for instance.

An herb garden may only need hand tools & containers. Long handle tools like shovel, rake, hoe, digging fork may be needed to grow potatoes, peas, carrots, sweet corn, beans...A lot depends on your tastes and needs.. and climate.... The farther North you live, the shorter the growing season...maybe not long enough for some plants.

Powered implements, like a roto-tiller, may be desirable if your plot exceeds a few dozen sq ft-- I highly recommend electric powered for those things you only use for a short time each year.
Thanks for your sharing, it will help me a lot in the process of building my own garden.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,419 Posts
The BB stores will have selections of both "cheap" and what I would call "medium" tools. For ultra expensive, I would look on-line and at the garden catalogs. Better tools (medium) will have more metal (length of tines on a rake, height and thickness of a hoe blade, for example--and will be slightly heavier) Look for wooden handles with grain like oak or ash(if there is any left), not plain white or painted. The handles may also be shaped for your hand and not just straight up and down. Most of all, look for tools that feel balanced and good in your hands.

For basic starter garden, I would get a spade, shovel, hoes and a garden rake. I would get a straight, chopper hoe, and a pointed hoe(for tiny weed control), and a decent garden pointed hand trowel.. Then I would go to the local rib shack to pick up some five gallon plastic buckets. And a hose and nozzle to carry water and stuff....and to wash out the BBQ sauce..... :) And a file to keep things sharp.

Who knows? All this gardening, and you may just become a homesteader.... So, one more thing: Buy yourself a good pair of gloves.

Best of luck,

geo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,663 Posts
You need to give us more information.

Different areas of the country have different needs. Where are you located - generally?
You say agricultural crops - are you gardening or farming?
Cheap gardening tools? Tools are an investment - get the best you can buy.
Crops? Do you have any idea of the length of your growing season? Soil type...etc?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The BB stores will have selections of both "cheap" and what I would call "medium" tools. For ultra expensive, I would look on-line and at the garden catalogs. Better tools (medium) will have more metal (length of tines on a rake, height and thickness of a hoe blade, for example--and will be slightly heavier) Look for wooden handles with grain like oak or ash(if there is any left), not plain white or painted. The handles may also be shaped for your hand and not just straight up and down. Most of all, look for tools that feel balanced and good in your hands.

For basic starter garden, I would get a spade, shovel, hoes and a garden rake. I would get a straight, chopper hoe, and a pointed hoe(for tiny weed control), and a decent garden pointed hand trowel.. Then I would go to the local rib shack to pick up some five gallon plastic buckets. And a hose and nozzle to carry water and stuff....and to wash out the BBQ sauce..... :) And a file to keep things sharp.

Who knows? All this gardening, and you may just become a homesteader.... So, one more thing: Buy yourself a good pair of gloves.

Best of luck,

geo
Thank you for such enthusiastic help, I will take your opinion
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You need to give us more information.

Different areas of the country have different needs. Where are you located - generally?
You say agricultural crops - are you gardening or farming?
Cheap gardening tools? Tools are an investment - get the best you can buy.
Crops? Do you have any idea of the length of your growing season? Soil type...etc?
I just want a small garden to have vegetables and fruits to eat every day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,245 Posts
You would get more specific advice if you would say what state you are gardening in. I recommend raised beds because they are above my clay soil and dry out faster in the spring. In other places you would do better with sunken beds to catch as much rain water as possible. Even compost pile construction (compost helps every soil type) is slightly different according to location.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You would get more specific advice if you would say what state you are gardening in. I recommend raised beds because they are above my clay soil and dry out faster in the spring. In other places you would do better with sunken beds to catch as much rain water as possible. Even compost pile construction (compost helps every soil type) is slightly different according to location.
You seem to be an expert in farming. Thank you for sharing your experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
or estate sales
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,663 Posts
I just want a small garden to have vegetables and fruits to eat every day.
You can start with a shovel, rake and spade.

Fruits most come from trees or vines. Strawberries grow in beds, blueberries on vines, oranges and citrus on trees where there's no snow, apples need a colder climate. (Remember, I asked where you were generally located).

vegetables - start asap with your soil. If you live where it's warm, like in the south, you can start growing now with lettuce, spinach etc. If you live in a snow area, as soon as the soil dries enough to work it, prepare the soil, then look for vegetables with a shorter growing season.

Make sure everything you plant has at minimum, 6 hours of full sun.
 

·
newfieannie
Joined
·
9,826 Posts
i wouldn't buy cheap in garden tools. i bought a shovel and it folded after a few digs. all i had when i started was a shovel, pick(fork?) a bucksaw and a rake. be surprised what you could do with just that. in case anybody wonders what i did with the bucksaw. i had to cut out alders . that's where i made my garden. those tools belonged to GF and i still have them. i also bought tools at a second hand tool store that sold really solid stuff. ~Georgia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Second the idea about estate sales and garage sales. Older tools may look ugly, but if they're sturdy they'll last you a lifetime--unlike the cheap stuff they're making nowadays. Pick up a pointed shovel (spade), a square-end shovel, a hoe, a pointed hoe, a garden rake (stiff metal tines), and a hand trowel. Oh, and as many 5-gallon buckets as you can find! Spend you hard-earned money on a brand new pair of pruning shears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Get good tools like everyone else says. If you don't have much money, get less tools. Where I live farmers do big ol' plantings with a shovel and a machete, not just because in some cases those are the only tools they own but because that's what they care to carry out to the field halfway up the mountain. More tools to carry is a bigger pain in the butt.

Keep your shovel sharp, like cut your finger sharp. With a good file this is actually very easy to accomplish (you push the file back up into the blade, if that makes sense, don't cut yourself). I find round point shovels to be more versatile.

If you "sweep" the sharp edge forward you can scrape off the top layer of vegetation very effectively for clearing planting areas. Then step the shovel in to break up the soil same as a pitchfork. Yes, the fork works better but the shovel works perfectly well and does everything else. Then smooth the field out by sweeping the dirt around with the back side of the shovel. Dig ditches around to protect from water, weeds and to separate beds.

I'm used to having a machete around anymore. In temperate climates clearing brush isn't as common a task as in the tropics but on the occasions I've found myself gardening in the states in recent years I've found a big knife to be useful every five minutes. Maybe I just like big knives but I'm used to having them around. Kitchen knives are good weeding tools, scrape them around.

Even when I have little trowels and such, I find myself either opening up plating holes with my fingers or if I need a tool I'll do it with the real shovel the little trowel takes too long. Concrete trowels are handy little tools, they weed well in addition to digging.

So, if you're on a budget get a good round point shovel and a file to sharpen it. And a good sturdy kitchen knife. A machete if you're into that sort of thing. Sharpen your knives with the file also.

WHEELBARROW next (very important for compost, making soil mixes, harvesting, etc), picks, rakes, forks, hori-hori knives, skinny hoes, fat hoes, weed whackers, roto tillers, greenhouses, garden tractors, farm tractors, backhoes, dumptrucks... Cattle production units to have enough manure on hand... Pigs, chicken coops... It gets out of control eventually
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,419 Posts
Seeds:

Lettuce, spinach, kale, carrots, green beans, chard, peas(if you get them in early enough), snow peas, turnip greens, acorn squash, I wouldn't mess with sweet corn as a beginner.

Plants:

Cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes, sweet peppers,hot peppers, sweet potatoes.

Sets:

Onions, potatoes,

You should find all of these in rhe BB store garden centersw. The seeds will be in packets on a big rack--usually Burpees. I wouldn't worry about the more expensive organic seeds for now. now.

Planting instructions are usually printed on the seed packets. I would suggest you go online to Johnnyseeds.com and look through their catalog. They have easy to understand planting instructions for everything they sell.

Hope this helps.

geo
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,756 Posts
I believe the OP is in HT jail (banned). Bring him your old trowel and a packet of last years seeds on visiting day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HTAdmin

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
didn't take him long either
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top