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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody know where I can buy 3/4" or 1" Acme threaded screws 18" long? Also the corresponding threaded flanges.

I've been restoring antique cider presses. Now I'm thinking of building a couple from scratch. The first step is to find screws that aren't priced more than the whole cider press is worth.
 

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Most any industral suplier of bolts will have them. Just google bolts and get the places to buy them.
 

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Check flee markets,antique stores,auctions for BROKEN piano stools . The junkier (pieces missing ) the better(cheaper).

Will have the flanges and screw for your project. You want the metal parts, not the wood :dance:
 

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well, very interesting,,,,to me. i have just purchased my first antique apple press/grinder...i too am considering putting together a metal kit so that others might be able to have a press...

i will probably make my screws and drive nut on a lath but....

last time i checked (a few years ago) McMaster-Carr carried acme and also square thread rod and nuts.

Msc may also have them but probably not in the size we would need.
 

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Enco (MSC spinoff) has them also. The larger sizes are PRICEY tho.
That's why the piano stool parts suggestion.

On apple grinders, have you seen the site that uses a wood cylinder with S.S. screws inserted in it at an angle for the "teeth" ? Neat idea
 

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We use a hydraulic cylinder instead of a screw, and use a garbage disposal to grind the apples.




The basket is a stainless steel cylinder, made of perforated stainless.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here's a before and after of my first press.







Here's what my current project looked like when I first got it.



Currently I've built a new gluelam fir frame for it. The metal brackets that hold the press tray have been naval jellied and wire brushed, then painted. Today the iron cross bar and screw went to the local body shop for bead blasting. I've started a new tray which will be exterior plywood with oak sides, lined with a stainless steel liner, so the plywood won't show. Also the stainless liner will make clenup easier. The basket will be redone in red oak just like the first press. The press disk will be made from a thick comercial grade plastic cutting board as I've had good luck doing that. I also have a inexpensive source for them.

As for a future press totally from scratch. I visited the local fastenal store today. I can get a 6 foot 7/8" acme screw and three nuts for around $50.00. Now I'll have to go learn to weld to make flanges with the nuts. I like the idea of the hydraulic press, but, my intent is making these to sell. Kind of a homestead cottage industry. I don't think the hydraulic press would sell as well with it's less than traditional apearance.
 

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HMMM. for some reason i would have thought white oak for the basket?

beautiful work by the way.....looks almost too good to use.
 

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Good on you for preserving these old tools! I came over here to see what you'd done from your link about the new presses.

I do the same thing with spinning wheels but my restorations aren't as involved as yours--mostly just knowing which thing to adjust to make it run properly, not much woodworking. Doesn't mean I wouldn't like to try some day.

Again, thanks for posting those pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ace admirer said:
HMMM. for some reason i would have thought white oak for the basket?

beautiful work by the way.....looks almost too good to use.
Thanks!

As for red oak over white. I can buy kiln dried red oak. The white oak or better yet beech that I could buy around here, would have to be sticked and dried. An urban homestead with a one car garage doesn't have room to be air drying lumber. I barely have room out there to work sometimes.

MOgal, thanks for your comments too. You might also find interesting that I only use antique hand tools when doing these projects. For the past year my power tools have been stored up in the shops rafters, and as far as I'm concerned, can stay there.
 
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