Where do you milk?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Tam319, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. Tam319

    Tam319 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    494
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Hi everyone,

    We are hoping to add a family milk cow to our ranch. What kind of bare bones facility do I need for milking? Do you all milk indoors? What basic equipment are essential?

    Thanks,
     
  2. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

    Messages:
    2,246
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Location:
    Northeastern Minnesota
    You can get by with a milk bucket, a feed bucket, a stool, and a fence post to tie her to, but you'll want more, escpecially on cold, windy, or rainy days.

    I built a little stall inside my barn (using OSB and a few 2"X4"'s) and continued using my stool and milk bucket; and then I cut one of my thumbs quite nearly off. I had been hand milking two cows, but with the injury pressing my to "do something" and quick, I bought a single cow milking machine from the Parts Department, and wouldn't give it up for anything.

    Now I just let the cow into the stall, tie her head, give her some grain, and she's fine. I'm out of the weather, she's out of the weather, and all of my cleaning rags and other apparati for milking are close at hand. Nothing fancy or grandiose, but it's plenty comfortable for the ten minutes it takes to milk a cow.
     

  3. Tam319

    Tam319 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    494
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2007
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Thanks for the info! How large is your indoor milking stall? What did the milking machine cost you (if you don't mind me asking)?

    Thanks,
    Tam
     
  4. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

    Messages:
    337
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    MN
    Haggis sounds like he has a nice cold-weather set-up.

    Break her to halter lead and handling her will be much easier.

    If you live in dairy country, watch farm sales for portable compressors and bucket milkers. A lot of guys who show cattle used to take these with them to fairs as some of the older facilities didn't have a parlor for milking your show cows.
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

    Messages:
    2,246
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Location:
    Northeastern Minnesota
    For a Jersey 10' long is way more than enough, and about 6' wide so she can turn around to leave. You can teach her to back, but she will still try to turn around; cows are quite clumsy backing up and they know it, so I don't try to fight them. My girls just spin on their heels (if a Jersey has a heel) and out they go.

    Even the AI guy uses my little stall for his messy work or for taking blood tests. The other day he came by and took a blood sample from beneath my first calf heifer's (Tulip) tail; while I was milking her! I don't have a squeeze for such work, but the girls are halter broken and gentled as Jack recommended above.
     
  6. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,441
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
  7. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

    Messages:
    2,601
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Location:
    mo
    we have a 6 by ten apx, gate swings in can tie to post to make shute to the head gate which has feed on the other side, they put heads through to eat shut it and close the gate back.

    the one i milk doesnt need the shute or the gate or even kickers, a nice relief from her mother :rolleyes:

    they all work off verbal commands never messed with halters. they know thier names and thier names mean food as does hup hup
     
  8. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

    Messages:
    2,246
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Location:
    Northeastern Minnesota
    The Ai guy was laughing at my ladies: Tulip comes into the stall at "Step-up" and Lucy comes in at "Sook Heifer". They both know to come to the barn no matter which one I call (there may be grain involved), but they only come into the stall for their own special call.
     
  9. portablemilkers

    portablemilkers New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Hi Tam
    We've helped many people in the US and Canada get started with machine milking, although I never deny that good ole hand milking can be a terriffic experience and time shared with ones girls. Which is better depends a lot on how many irons you have in the fire from the get go. Refurbished, guaranteed barebone systems usually run around 650.00 & up, this includes vacuum pump and milker.
    Your locality, breed your milking, history of your girl, frequency of milking etc. all helps someone like us to configure a system to perform the best at the lowest cost.
    You can visit our website and look over some new and refurbished milking equipment, we have trade-ins frequently available that are not on the site as they tend to sell as soon as they arrive. Feel free to contact us with questions anytime. Here is our site.
    http://www.portablemilkers.com/page/page/1573150.htm