Where do you milk?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by suzyhomemaker09, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. suzyhomemaker09

    suzyhomemaker09 Well-Known Member

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    Before our fire I had a really nice covered screened in back porch where I had my milkstand..it worked great. Now after..as I don't have a cover to the porch anymore I've been looking at alternatives. I really don't like milking out in the barn as it seems not to be a good place...manure in the air..animals milling around..etc.
    Now my idea is to get a shed to sit on a slab I have behind my house...it's around 8x10..very close to an electrical outlet..very close to a water spigot. DH doesn't think it'd be a good idea...lack of ventilation being his main con to my idea.
    What do you all do...do you think my idea woudl work? :shrug:
     
  2. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    On nice days I just milk in the yard squatted down next to my girls and then on nasty days I just milk in the barn. Better than the rain
     

  3. mammawof3

    mammawof3 Well-Known Member

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    I think your idea is a fine one! :) I milk in the "open air"-yes, my 2 dairy girls will come out in the rain-though i do try to wait till it slows down, if it is raining. I tried several different ways-and the "others" would always get in the way!--no one will try the hot wire--so, my milk stand is outside the gate-the 2 girls would happily run through theopen gate-and jump up on the stand--even though they COULD go anywhere in the yard from there! I dried both up now-and hope to have some sort of a tarp or something for a rain gaurd by next year--last time i had goats i also milked in the "open"--years ago, when i had lots of Nubians-i had my goat barn behind my garage-w/door into it--i let does into the garage where i had 2 milk stands set up.-nice little set up--i miss that time in my life--nice set up-gorgeous does-great bloodlines-good market for my kids!! A lifetime ago--and about 200 miles! :shrug: Love those goats!!
     
  4. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My favorite set-up was one a good friend of mine had before she moved to AZ. She had it attached to her barn, but totally separated from all the dust and manure by solid walls and a solid door. It was extremely clean, yet the does did not have to go out in the rain to get to the milk room. This to me is a BIG plus. Getting those does from the barn to the milkroom can be *such* a pain if there is not a roof over their poor heads....we all know they melt! :)

    But if you can't do something like this, the set-up you describe sounds like it would work very well. :)
     
  5. nduetime

    nduetime I am a Christian American Supporter

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    Don't laugh but my favorite place is the basement. We have an exposed basement with a huge patio type door. Easy to get the goat in and I have a frig and freezer right there to cool down the milk. Cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Cement floor is easy to keep clean and my does have never poo'd or pottyed when we milk anyway.
     
  6. Marjorie Dickso

    Marjorie Dickso Well-Known Member

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    Trish, I love your idea of staying out of the weather AND in the warmth in the winter. Wonder if Hubby will go along with it...

    When I milk the cows I put a bucket behind them. They usually don't go potty but once in a while they do.

    I have another question for anyone that is a concrete person. My large shed (actually hubbys) has a concrete floor that is very smooth. When the cows walk in, they slip and slide so I have to use some hay on the floor for traction. I have mat's down at the stanchion and they are horrible to keep clean. The question is, what can I do to the cement so they can have traction? One person said get an epoxy that has sand in it, the vet wondered if there is a machine that will slightly rough up the concrete. Any suggestions?
    Margie
     
  7. nduetime

    nduetime I am a Christian American Supporter

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    There is a paint that you can put on concrete that has sand or something in it for traction. I do not remember what it is called, sorry. You could also try those strips that you epoxy down. Since I am cheap I would try roofing shingles, plenty rough, just not sure how they would stand up to cow traffic. When we had the barn concreted I made sure they did a "rough" brush to give some traction for wet times.
     
  8. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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    Lucky you! mine had a habit of needing to go!
     
  9. jd4020

    jd4020 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just this year I graduated up to a building that actually is a room someone had torn off their house when remodeling. We were going to remodel and add it on to the house we were living in many years ago, but didn't. It has linoleum/vinyl flooring--on the need side, the floor corner by the door is falling a bit, on the plus side, I can scrub the floor and then take the hose in and hose it into that corner and have instant drain. there is a window on the east, north and west side, complete with storm windows and on the south side is a door that went into the next room, which was where the furnace and water heater sat so it is a little porch, if you will and the part that was attached to the main house. The outside door is on the west side. For a time my daughters used it to house their dwarf rabbits and since the little guys need heat help, we outfitted it with a wall mount gas heater. I mounted a wall cupboard to hold my supplies above the heater and the ladies are very glad the teat dip is heated in the colder months. Although it has plugins, there is no power unless I run the orange drop cord from the shed--I have a couple of times when I have to do late night chores. I store my feed barrels, have a couple of cupboards and the old porcelin sink with a drainboard upon which I feed the cats.
    My routine is to go in, feed and water the cats. Fill the feed bowls (I have four goats, only milking one at this time), take two feed bowls and two chain collars out to the nearby pen. I never keep collars on them since I lost a lovely saanen doe when she hung herself several years ago. Collar the same two, Bessie, an alpine and Nubby, a lamancha, so named for the small teats and ears. I give Molly-a 12 year old mix who is a lovely shade of brown, her bowl in one side of the wooden shed, shut her in and give Cookie- also a big alpine, her bowl on the other side. This way I know they each get their share. Cookie is quite bossy. Well, Molly is too, but she's getting older..... The other two are very good about waiting til I take them out and we go over to the milk house. The door knob is broken so they just push it open themselves. Nubby is first so she jumps on the stand. I put Bessies' bowl in a small wash tub on the floor so she can't paw it over with her foot. I wash up Nubbys' udder, dry it off, first squirts in a small bucket and then milk out in my regular milk bucket, a gift many years ago from my dh for my birthday. Stainless steel is so nice. Has lasted quite well for 23 years. Then dip the teats (I use those little plastic measure cups that come with the cough medicine) I'm usually done with the first before the other girl is done eating, so then switch girls. Give Nubby a bit of beet shreds to keep her happy til I'm done with Bessie. Then I take them back to the pen, let Molly out and gather those bowls. Rake out some hay and give fresh water, warm in the winter, it's just too cold and I only have the four so it's no big deal. Then I go wipe down my counters, sweep up the milk stand and floor, **** out the cats, gather up my rags (for udder washing and drying), teat cups, wash bucket and milk and head for the house to strain out the milk. I use stainless steel bowls for their feed bowls, set in the same size black rubber bowls for stability. There's a bowl for each girl and I usually wash them out 2-3 times a week or more often if they need it. It's just easier to get their ration ready all at the same time.
    A rather pleasant way to begin the day---same routine in the evening.
    That's just the way I do it round here. :)
     
  10. Eunice

    Eunice Well-Known Member

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    My 5 yr. does are twins. I just put a pan of feed in front of them and sit on a milk crate to milk them. The other three are unrelated and a big difference in personalities, so I tie them in their pen and milk them outside. I do have a lean-to if the weather gets real bad. Four of my five does are bred to kid in March. So, I will be drying them up the first of the year and not milking during the real bad weather.
     
  11. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    Please don't laugh at me on this but when I was milking my doe. I would milk out in the wide open air but if a storming really bad I would bring my doe in the kitchen to milk because she don't like lightning storms. Only thing I had to do is open my deck gate and she come straight up on the deck to be let in. Goats are very smart.. :) I was only milking one doe then hope to be 4 later.

    My DH would just laugh his butt off at me because of bringing the doe in kitchen but dang when it lightning that bad here I said I not going to sit outside and milk. I only milk through the summer to fall this year. Hopeing later be spring on up to fall.

    Good Luck on your goats. :)
     
  12. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your idea of a shed sounds fine. I have a large garage with a dirt floor where I milk my goats.
     
  13. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    I have milked 1) in the shed 2)outside the shed in the loafing yard 3) outside the enclosure in the open air and 4)in basement adjacent to the shed/loafing yard. The ladies spend their day in the "big" yard and come down to the shed/loafing yard at night. I have lately been milking in the basement and it is great! Clean, where we all store all the goaty stuff, cement floor, dry and warm in the winter, cool in the summer, etc. We are building another milking stand since we will have 3 milkers come April.

    Vanessa
    near Nashville
     
  14. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    If you talk to a cement guy there is an acutal machine that they can use to put some traction in the cement. Pretty common for cow barns to have the cement groved. It would probably be expensive to get someone out to do that. A cheap and effective way to give your cows some traction would be to sprinkle barn lime down. They won't slip on that.

    Heather
     
  15. Marjorie Dickso

    Marjorie Dickso Well-Known Member

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    Well, thank you Heather. I do have lime, but never would have thought it wouldn't be slick. I'll try it tomorrow. Our shed was built waay before I thought of milking in it.

    Up North: I thought of seeing if a rental place has the machine.


    Apologies for getting this thread off track. It just seemed a good place to put my question. Thanks