where do I place my hives.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by silosounds, Nov 14, 2004.

  1. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    We moved to a farm in Kansas and there were a large pile of wooden bee hives
    we would like to revive these hives but dont really know how or where to locate them. also could there be a chance of disease and is there a way to sterlize them or should we start from scratch? what is afb?
     
  2. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    I am guessing that there are no bees in these hives? If not, you will either have to capture a swarm or buy package bees. Look at the frames. If there are bees inside the cells with their butts sticking out, then the hive died of startvation, and probably does not have any other problems. I would throw away any moldy frames. If the hives have dead brood (larval bees) in the frames, I would dig a hole about three feet deep, put two cinderblocks in the bottom, with a ball of newspaper between them, stack three or four boxes on top of eachother, and burn the lot. repeat until there are no hive pieces left. You do not want to risk spreading diseases. Once you have determined that you have disease-free equipment, I would recommend placing the hives in a wind-sheltered location, where the hives get full sun, and where cold, damp air will not settle. also, make sure hives can't get wet due to floodwaters. you may want to consider vehicle access to help you with heavy boxes of honey... Once you have the ideal location, set up the hive and add your bees in the spring. AFB is a nasty disease that spreads by spores, and will soon infect an entire apiary if not dealt with quickly and properly.

    justgojumpit
     

  3. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    I’m not sure what you mean by moldy is this real mold like what’s on cheese these bodies do have a brownish to yellow like wax on the sides where it looks like the supers had been removed is this part of the old hive? The bodies where torn apart or separated and thrown in a pile we did find one super that was full of cocoon shaped fuzzy thing that had hatched is this what they call wax moth? And if these are infected with either the moth or afb how long does it take naturally to get rid of this as its been a good 13 years since they have been used.
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Brownish yellow wax is OK, it has just seen a bit of use.

    Some people recommend that newbies start out with all new equipment so there is no chance of disease, and some people point out that MOST used hives are clean. You need to make your own decision about this.

    The first thing to do, I think, is to buy a book and read up on basic honey bee care. Diseases will be covered. And, yes, the cocoons DO sound like wax moths. You have obviously been looking into the subject! :haha:

    On the GOOD side......

    Honey prices are way up right now. Modern strains of bees are much less likely to sting than the older types. And, there are NO Africanized bees in Kansas.

    An established (2 year old) hive in Kansas produces an average of 60 pounds of honey more than the bees need. There are 2 main honey flows in Kansas: 1 in the spring and 1 in the fall. The fall honey is not as tasty and many beekeepers leave it all for the bees.
     
  5. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    once again thanks for the good info I think I would like to start with new I dont really have the time or money to waste on bee replacement in case of contamination what strain of bee is best I would like dosile bees so my sons can help with the bees . is there such a creature.
     
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    How old is your son?

    Some strains of bees are more docile than others, but even a docile bee will sting if you do something that sets off their instincts.

    For example, when I open a hive I move slowly and smoothly, and I am only occasionally stung. That is pretty good when you consider that I am picking up frames of their babies to examine.

    I usually get away with this because I am not acting like a predator. Predators smash and grab. By acting in a calm, relaxed manner I can save myself a lot of pain.

    You might enjoy www.mid-conagri.com. It has an on-line bee catalogue.
     
  7. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    my son is 10 and has been stung so we know he's not allergic, and he has a lot of common sence for his age. Iwas just wondering about when the kids get to close to the bee hive playing or messing about is there a strain that would not attack outside the hive but I think you answered it with the being a preditor
    approach also there is a nieghbor who said they had a extracter for sale and wants 100.00 for it is this a good or fair price she said it was 20 yrs old and possibly needs a motor (elect.) And its metal not stainless? We still are a bit confused about placement of the hive we have a 20 acear alfalfa field near the tree farm but its river bottom although it doesnt flood often it could and the rest of the property is higher but forest except where I grow my herbs its about 2 acears but I would be near it working alot of the time would that give the bees a reason to leave or would I be stung alot I really want the bees for the herbs also this 2 acears is about 1000 yrds. from the alfalfa field and is in full sun do I need shade when its hot or a wind break for the cold months.
     
  8. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    a wind break would be good for the cold months. The herb garden sounds good, as long as it is not at the peak of a cleared hill. The bees would be able to fly over the trees to the alfalfa field when that is in bloom. Your herbs should benefit as well. The other thing you might consider if there is not much nectar within about two miles of you (other than the alfalfa) would be to situate your hive at a farm. for instance: an apple orchard with other crops nearby would be ideal, and i'm sure the farmers wouldn't mind the extra pollination.

    justgojumpit
     
  9. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the herb garden will work I dont really trust the farmers around us they spray year round to kill pests we live in the midst of chemical central I might fit in if monsanto made pesticide ready bees. Thanks for all the advice i cant wait to get the beekeepers catalogs i orderd and will be getting in touch with www.mid-conagri.com (thanks terri).
     
  10. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    Don't know about KS, but in IL if you have your hives registered with the state and neighboring farmers spray insecticide and it kills your hive, the farmer is financially responsible to reimburse you. It is the farmers responsibility to check with the state to see where apiaries are located. We live next to seed corn fields and soybean fields. Before we registered our hives, the farmer applied the insecticide via airplanes, since we've registered, they now apply using ground equipment. They can only spray in early morning or late evening and only if the wind speed is low. We've not had problems with the inscectides - the farmer was very glad to have honeybees help work his field.
     
  11. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the info Ill check on the laws here.
     
  12. Kansas Beeman

    Kansas Beeman New Member

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    We have no laws in Kansas regarding spraying. It has been a problem in the western part for many years. Most of us just move our bees to a wintering location away from the alfalfa until the farmers are through spraying and then move back in after 5 days(depends on the type of spray). You might want to join the Kansas Honey Producers. There are many good beekeepers there that are willing to help and they are scattered across the state. For alfalfa you should consider one hive per acre for honey produtction. However, as has been said before more alfalfa from a different farmer would be good so that there is more chance of some field in bloom. In Kansas one can make anywhere from 60 to 150 lbs per year depending on weather and the amount of cuts the farmer does. If you talk with Joli or Cecil at Mid Con she will probably be able to put you in contact with one of us. We are always Happy to have new beekeepers.
     
  13. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I have bees in my back yard, and they make no problem with the kids.

    Of course, at ages 10 and 11 they prefer to stay a good 20 feet away from the hives.

    Bees fly a good ways to forage. Find a spot with a windbreak, and they will happily fly to the forage.
     
  14. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    I would love to get into bee keeping and find peaple close to me to maybe show us what to do ,I helped a nieghbor once get a sworm from a tree in our field and fell in love with it but now 30 yrs. later im going to do this. So its good to know there is peaple across the state. :)
     
  15. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I bet there is a local bee keeping group near you.
     
  16. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    Well there is, but we live in a city were they don't care much for outsiders and were from Colorado!!! which is really bad because all we do is "buy up the land and improve it so the taxes go up and try to bring our big city way to a town that has been doing things the right way for generations" or so the local bee keeper has told me. But what I think its all about is he sells honey to people here and he doesn't want competition. So he hasn't been very helpful, won't even answer simple question like I've asked on this forum. I'm going to try to find others in other counties and have went to extension office to get info but didnt really get to far, if it aint wheat or cows we don't have info. By the way, I dont recommend Rooks county to anyone. Sorry for the ranting.
     
  17. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Try a web search for beekeepers or bee clubs. Personally, I belong to the North Western Beekeepers Association.

    Don't let one cranky beekeeper speak for the whole bunch. Beekeepers tend to be a bunch of individuals in a MAJOR way. The way that one beekeeper acts is not likely to be the way any other beekeeper acts. Just remember that a friendly beekeeper is also going to have his pet theories.

    I have found the Kansas beekeepers to be opinionated, but helpfull and friendly. I bet MOST of the beekeepers in your area are, also, even if one of them *IS* sour!
     
  18. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    :eek: And, when THAT doesn't work, try Northeastern Kansas Beekeeper’s Association :eek:

    Aw, heck, I never DID have a sence of direction! :haha:
     
  19. electronrider

    electronrider Well-Known Member

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    Does your state have any kind of office for bees? In indiana, there is an apiary inspector, and she talked my ear off! let me know about the local bee politics, and said that If I buy any used equipment, that she would come inspect it to make sure that there werent any problems! I have refrained from talking locallly, some people just dont like competition LOL.
     
  20. silosounds

    silosounds Well-Known Member

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    I have alot of checking into I dont think that the local bee keepers have to worry about me competing with them I just want it for my family and extended family. We dont even really have a market locally since the store doesnt allow non usda honey to be sold. I would like to have someone local to talk to but for know Im enjoying you all.