when to get a new-used car

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by suehi, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. suehi

    suehi Active Member

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    What would have to be wrong with your car in order to consider buying another? I know with the gas prices being as high as the sky that is enough to make anybody reconsider. My car is 9 yrs old, Nissan Sentra 145,000 + miles and needing a lot more maintain ace more often. It seems when I fix one thing, I have to fix another. I am uneasy about even buying anything at this point, that's besides just the gas. I actually had a signed deal with the kia dealership. Took the car home and returned it the next day. It just did not feel right. But how much money do you put into an older car before it is costing more for maintenance than anything. Oh, it is paid off. We only have one car payment. I am not one of those people needing to keep up with the Jones’s either. But, I do like nice things don't get me wrong. I would just like to know when do others consider buying a used car and how much would you pay for it? I mean would you ever finance any amount?

    Ok, give it to me easy :help:

    Suehi
     
  2. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    look at it this way, buying parts is always cheaper than making a car payment with the additional high coverage insurance new car requires.

    a nissan sentra is a good car, as long as it isnt rusted out, and its solid, you can always replace mechanical parts.

    even with labor, the long run expence of new vs paid for used in outgoing money is in favor of the nissan....

    which IIRC gets great MPGS!

    plus if you dent or scratch it, its just adding charicter, if you dent or scratch your new kia its a horrible trade in value downer that will bum you out.

    so the nissan is a low stress car also.

    lol
     

  3. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    Being that I"m not mechanically inclined, when the car starts breaking down, is undependable, or starts nickle & diming me to death, it's time for a new one. And by new one, I mean a car that is new to ME!

    I don't plan on ever buying a brand new car ever again. As soon as you drive off the lot, your car isn't worth what you just paid for it (or financed it for). I'll let someone else buy the new car (take the depreciation), and then buy it when they trade it in in a couple of years for a newer model!
     
  4. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    As I am not mechanically inclined, I buy a new Toyota and wear it out (7 to 10 years or about 300+ thousand miles). I usually have minimum maintenance for years with Toyotas.
     
  5. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    A lot depends on what vehicle one has and how able they are to fix things. Some vehicles and models, even specific years, are known as maintenance headaches (or "mechanics' job security") and others are known for requiring very little maintenance. Even within the best models and years there is variation in durability.

    Driving style can obviously affect durability. Young men and novice drivers are not known for improving vehicle life, for instance.

    Those who are accustomed to doing their own maintenance and repair may be more forgiving of problems than someone who has to pay "shop rate" to have everything done.

    We use a 1992 Dodge diesel pickup to pull our home and for general transportation. It is "just a baby" with only 150,000 miles. The truck it replaced (which we still own) stayed in regular service until way over 300,000 -- which is far fewer than some.

    The old "nickel and dime me to death" argument doesn't convince me. I'd far rather buy repair parts once in a while than lay out a wad of cash or "easy monthly payments", either of which keep one enslaved. It would cost $35,000 or so to replace our truck with a similar new one that I regard as inferior to the old "First Generation Cummins Diesel" trucks.

    "Get a good one and run it 'till the wheels fall off" seems like good advice. And "learn to fix stuff" is too.
     
  6. FeralFemale

    FeralFemale Bitter Clinger

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    Not quite on topic, but this post reminded me of our old Ford Jeep pick up truck. I remember riding with Dad when the odometer turned over to all zeros again. Wanna talk about an old truck! Of course, we didn't buy a new one because we coundn't afford it. I believe, in the end, it was held together in places by coat hangers.
     
  7. NCGirl

    NCGirl Well-Known Member

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    FeralFemal..... they turned over at 100,000 or 1,000,000????? If it turned over at 100,000 that is less than half the minimum I expect a car to get these days!! Now, if you mean a million miles then that is indeed impressive :)
     
  8. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    FeralFemale, can you estimate the year of the old Jeep?

    Prior to the 1960s or so many vehicle odometers had only five digits, thus they rolled to all zeros at 100,000 miles.

    That many miles may have been impressive at the time. I remember reading that the average car in the junkyard in the 1950s had only 75,000 miles. Dad's old 1939 Studebaker went to 125,000 by the early '50s -- but looked like "mosquito control" going down the road and was rated in "miles per quart" of engine oil (probably about 100).

    Advances in metallurgy and manufacturing have made a big difference. Does anyone remember when it first became possible to expect 10,000 miles from a set of tires? Or, when gasoline cost 19 cents a gallon (1950s) and one could drive all week on the “dollar’s worth of gas” that we usually told the gas station employee (people did not fill their own tank in those times).
     
  9. FeralFemale

    FeralFemale Bitter Clinger

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    I want to say 999,999....I was very young. It was the late 70s, I think. Trucks would have 6 digit odometers, right? Not 5? And that truck served as our primary vehicle for YEARS. It would have to be 1million.
     
  10. FeralFemale

    FeralFemale Bitter Clinger

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    I was born in the early 70s. We had the car for quite a while, till the late 80s. I don't think it was as old as a 60s model....Im sorry. I couldn't tell you.
     
  11. NCGirl

    NCGirl Well-Known Member

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    It would be pretty unusual for a family truck to get 1 million miles, probably 100,000 which was probably a "sorta" big deal :nerd: to show the kids!! I remember my dad doing that when I was a kid. He told us a few weeks beforehand that it was upcoming and we watched and watched and watched those #'s Seems kinda funny now but I do remember it!!
     
  12. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    FeralFemale,

    I must be about a contemporary of your father's. Would he have been born about 1940 or a little before?

    I can't help with when the six digit odometers became common. It seems recent to me, but so does the Vietnam War.

    Our perception of what constitutes a lot of driving has changed too. I remember my parents regarding a twenty-five mile drive to see "country relatives" as something to not taken lightly and done infrequently.

    Our old Studebaker totaled 125,000 miles in something over twelve years while serving as the family daily use and "to work" vehicle the whole time. It even went on a couple LONG, LONG trips between Pennsylvania and Florida.
     
  13. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My '86 Escort has a 5 digit odometer, no one is sure how many times it has turned over!
     
  14. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    I've heard of Ford pickup trucks and Jeep pickup trucks but never have I heard of a Ford Jeep pickup truck.

    6 digit trip odometers didn't show up in pickup until the late '80s or early '90s for most pickups. I can't think of a single one that had it in the '70s.
     
  15. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Ford produced clone of Willys Jeep back in WWII as Willys couldnt keep up with military demand. But it wasnt really a pickup.

    Kinda rare for 6 digit odometer in 70s. Volvo may have been one of few who did this. Cant think when pickups started having such.

    Yes people dont remember but 100k miles on a vehicle even in '60s was a big deal. First Volvo I bought was a '76 with 200k. I needed a car and went and looked at all the cheap cars advertised in local shopper paper. The Volvo drove the best. I still thought I was crazy buying a car with 200k and gave like $200 for it. That Volvo was one of my favorites Volvos. Gave like 60k more reliable miles with very little repair needed. I replaced timing belt once alongside of the road and had to go thru the brakes. Thats it. Body finally started flexing due to rust (Michigan car) and it got parked. Still out in field but not much left of it. Need to remove windshield and grab couple parts and let it go to scap yard to make more Chinese toasters.
     
  16. FeralFemale

    FeralFemale Bitter Clinger

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    Yeah, that's why I was hesitant about the 1 million.... but I can't imagine it was only 100,000. I just remember the turn over from all nines to all zeros.

    I've been looking on the internet for a picture and realized that there is no Ford Jeep. I remember as clear as day that the tailgate was black with JEEP on the back in white and that it was a ford because it had ford on it and we called it 'the ford.' My only guess can bee that the tailgate was replaced with a jeep tailgate?
     
  17. Richard6br

    Richard6br Well-Known Member

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    If I did my math right, and if the car was bought new with no miles, and you drove 100 miles a day for 365 days a year, it would take about 28 yrs to get to the 1 million mile marker.
     
  18. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Richard6br, excellent point. I verified your calculations at 27.397 years. It would also require fifty thousand gallons of gasoline (at 20 mpg) costing roughly $150,000 at today's prices.

    A "million miles" or half million is not uncommon for over-the-road trucks that travel hundreds of miles per day, and it is reported for some automobiles. But a personal vehicle in common use is unlikely to achieve the million mile mark.
     
  19. ozarkcat

    ozarkcat Well-Known Member

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    My 89 F-150 has 5 digits, the previous owner thought it only had around 65,000 on it, I'm beginning to suspect unless it was driven REALLY hard, it's probably closer to 265,000 - And in a V-8 360, I don't even _want_ to think how much gas that is!

    As far as when to buy a new vehicle, probably when you're having to put more maintenance into it money-wise than the car payment would be. Wish I'd have known that when I got rid of my little Chevy Cavalier that got about 40 MPG :Bawling:
     
  20. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    CN is pretty much on about insurance and payments. You also may have to pay higher license fees on the newer vehicle. And if you're in a state with a damnedable Personal Property Tax they soak you on that too. I know guys who keep slapping nice old truck bodies on new salvage chassis to get around that impediment. Screw me Mr. Tax man? Screw you!

    As far as older vehicles vs newer ones. They just don't build them like they use to. They build them better. You never use to see vehicles getting the kinds of engine life that you do now. A car these days is just getting going at 100,000 miles. Back in the day they rarely reached those kinds of numbers. You were looking at a rebuild at what 60 or 70 K if you were lucky? A valve job at 30? Auto trannies use to be a hit or miss thing now they outlast the car. Not only that but they were a power robbing "slush box" . Now they're efficient and computer controlled and even adapt for different driving situations. They handle better. They're faster (for the most part) and they get more horsepower and torque while using less fuel.