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MacCurmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you wear by way of protection from the cold?

For knocking about the barn and the wood pile, I wear Carhartt Arctic bibs and Jacket (I have several sets of these), but for hiking, hunting, snowshoeing, or running a trapline in very cold weather I have a Cabelas Anorak which I wear above woolen breeches; all layered of course.

What do you wear against the cold?
 

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Pyromaniac Weaponologist
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If it isn't too cold I just throw on an army jacket.
If really cold I use a wool layer and then a Carhartt jacket and a fur hat.
 

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Premium Member
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Well, it's been 27 degrees one time here and so I waited until 8 a.m. to start the hunt. Other than that, just one layer, socks, britches, undershirt, flannel shirt, light jacket. When cutting firewood, I usually just go T-shirt. I've gotten used to this average of 50-60 degree temps in the winter time.
 

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MacCurmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, it's been 27 degrees one time here and so I waited until 8 a.m. to start the hunt. Other than that, just one layer, socks, britches, undershirt, flannel shirt, light jacket. When cutting firewood, I usually just go T-shirt. I've gotten used to this average of 50-60 degree temps in the winter time.
We had -45 on our north wall temperature gauge a few days ago, and I was out running the snow blower before daylight; had to wear my snoeshows to get to the barn and the machine. It was mostly drifted snow and 8" or 10" of new snow on top of 6" or so of old snow, I didn't so much mind the snow as the wind; it was disheartening.
 

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Yeah that blizzard last weekend was pretty cold and windy. Like you said the wind is the worst.

I've been putting on my long underwear to feed and water the animals in the morning this week. Cold weather hit so suddenly that my body isn't used to it yet although the other night it was -5 and it didn't seem very cold.
 

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We had our 1st big snow last nite/today, I measured 14" and blowing.
(Yeah, I know that we are gonna get into the "well, I got.....blah, blah")

Anyway, I like my old army 50% cotton/50%wool long johns, loose fitting, flannel lined jeans, Carhartt Blizzard overalls, T-Shirt, flannel shirt, Hooded sweatshirt (gang bangers wear "Hoodies", I don't), Carhartt jacket, and stocking hat, lined gloves.
Love those layers.

This is what I would normally wear working out side all day, working on heating equipment on roof-tops.

Out blowing the snow for about 3 hours, hate it when my glasses get wet, can't see..........
City guy came by, driving a pick-up,( was nice and warm in there), stopped as I was blowing down the street to clear the drain in the gutter.
He says, "hey, don't blow snow in the street !", I said, that's where it came from, and after he saw the look on my face, decided to go harass some one else.

Sheesh, give someone an insignia on the side of their truck, they think they run the whole city.......................Probally gonna get busted by the "snow-blower police".
 

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Carhartts around the farmstead, wool and fleece in the woods. Goose down when its really cold and I'm not moving around much, ice fishing, etc.

My DW from FL couldn't believe how many different clothes, boots, hats, gloves, mittens, etc, you need up here in the north.

Hunter63, I got my Dad one of those shields that mount to the handles of the snowblower. I can't believe how much it helps, wish we would have had one 30 years ago.

A couple pieces of gear I have and like are a gorilla balaclava from Outdoor Research and a set of ski goggles. They've made life bearable on treks across lakes that might have meant some frostbite. They work for the snowblower too.
 

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J.S,
I hear ya on the balaclava, hunting, I use a silk one and for work, I use the Carhartt stocking hat w/face holes.
Guess I need to try the goggles.

Hunting stuff varies as to game hunted, weather, style, etc. list too long to try to list.

Interestingly, my favorite hooded sweat-shirt is a real heavy "Walls" in blue.
I always wondered why Walls, Carhartt and some of the others didn't make any of their heavy stuff in Blaze orange, (Guess it's just a Wisconsin thing).

So I actually contacted them and was told that there wasn't a market for them.
This year I found a Carhartt Blaze orange Heavy hooded sweat shirt at a Tractor Supply Store. Of course I had to buy one.
You would have though that they would have given me one for free, for bringing up the idea. Right?
 

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Cactus Farmer/Cat Rancher
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Depending on what I am doing outside and the temp I'll ether have a ton of layers or just one layer with a coat. Last week I rode my motorcycle, I think it was about 5 below when I got to my friend's house. I had on three pairs of socks, my insulated rubber boots, jogging shorts, pants of coarse, insulated bibs, Carhartt bibs over that to keep the the wind out, two sweat shirts, a insulated flannel jacket, blaze orange hooded sweat shirt, balaclava, a ski mask, scarf, and of coarse a helmet and goggles and gloves. Still was a cold ride. Trouble was I didn't have anything on the upper body that really blocked out the wind. Coldest I have ridden in has been 15 below, I think I'll be breaking that record this year :)
 

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Cactus Farmer/Cat Rancher
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How in the world did you steer the bike?? You could have fallen over and not hurt a thing. :)
Steering isn't too hard. Since the bike is a dual sport it sits up pretty high so the part where I have to get on the bike that is tough one :)

Last year I decided to go stuntman and try drifting the bike around a corner on ice. It didn't work and it was the only time I have ever went down on the road on a bike (on the sand I am a regular smash and crash expert), and yes being bundled up does help when you crash :)
 

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MacCurmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Steering isn't too hard. Since the bike is a dual sport it sits up pretty high so the part where I have to get on the bike that is tough one :)

Last year I decided to go stuntman and try drifting the bike around a corner on ice. It didn't work and it was the only time I have ever went down on the road on a bike (on the sand I am a regular smash and crash expert), and yes being bundled up does help when you crash :)
All those layers must be a boon when coming off high side on to the ice?
 

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Cactus Farmer/Cat Rancher
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All those layers must be a boon when coming off high side on to the ice?
I came off the low side that time, although when I was a kid I once flipped my three wheeler going down the road and went flying over the handle bars. That was on ice too, I was sliding the rear end back and forth just because and hit some gravel and suddenly the three wheeler turned into a catapult. I say one thing, going up and over during the winter hurts much less, the snow takes out a bit of the pain and it is hard to get road rash from ice :D
 
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