When Hogs Go Feral

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by big rockpile, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I can see them going through so many changes.But why do their Piglets change to this?

    [​IMG]

    big rockpile
     
  2. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    That is a picture of a European wild hog...or at least it is a wild hog that has strong physical characteristics of a EWH. It is all in the genetics that the piglets look the way they do...like the spots on a deer fawn, they disappear with time and provide camoflauge while the hogs are young. Here is a link on EWH and how they came to the U.S. http://www.smokymtnmall.com/mall/whogs.html

    The EWH must have genetic coloration traits that are somewhat dominant over other hog species.
     

  3. Outlaw9

    Outlaw9 GO VOLS!!!!

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    Thats wild looking. Dont javelinas look something like that?
     
  4. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I think your right.

    This picture was taken in Texas,but the Wild Piglets around here are the same.

    big rockpile
     
  5. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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  6. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Me thinks sow eat :croc: many fawn
     
  7. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I did some research on this years ago, but I don't remember all the details now. It's been too long, but I do remember that I was really surprised how quickly after going feral that the pigs started to be born striped. It took very few generations. I'm thinking 3 or fewer, but I just can't remember now. Of course, I sure part of it would be breeding with hogs that were already feral, and the striping on the pigs is probably a dominant trait.
     
  8. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    I wonder .... does it work the other way around? If you have pigs with stripes and you keep in a pen for a few generations do they start to lose their stripes? :shrug:
     
  9. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure you could maintain the striping if you wanted to by keeping track of pigs that were born striped, and breeding for that trait. I know that there is a breed that the pigs are born striped. I think it's either the Red Wattle or the Mulefoot, but I can't remember for sure.
     
  10. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    The european wild boar are striped when they are born. People call them watermellons. They will loose the stripes as they get older.
    If you notice in the picture, that isn't a sow and her pigs. The larger hog is male.
    You can keep a european hog in a pen for as many generations as you want and they will be the same color. Domestication does not change color, selective breeding does that.
    Going feral does not make the change in color either. It is the introduction of the european wild boar that changes the color.
     
  11. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    Okay, I guess that would make sense.
     
  12. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate you clearing that up. It's just been too long since I had done any research on it, and just couldn't remember everything.
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    One of the piglets in Oinky's clan, the red gilt I kept and named Grunt was born striped- not extremely pronounced stripes like the photo here shows but stripes. Since I am a wild pig enthusiast she caught my eye and I decided to keep her. The stripes are still faintly visible. I had two others with stripes on areas that were more like striped spots. The red butt I kept, Squeaker is a striped red butt. I also had a male striped blue butt. I've seen a Tamworth with stripes as a shoat, dunno if that is how they naturally appear though.
     
  14. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I do remember that there is a breed that the pigs are born striped, and I'm reasonably certain that it is either the Red Wattle or the Mulefoot, but I can't find any verification on it now.
     
  15. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    The mulefoot isn't a breed. It is just a hog with a mule foot, instead of the split hog foot. They come in all different colors.
     
  16. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I think the American Mulefoot Hog Association and Registry would disagree with you.
     
  17. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    I think they would be wrong. It is possible to have a registry for anything. That doesn't make it a separate breed.
    Several months ago there was some post about the choctaw hog, a mulefoot, supposedly raised by the choctaws in south eastern Okla.
     
  18. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    The ALBC also calls it a breed and has given it conservation priority. A group of animals with similar characteristics that consistently reproduce those characteristics is a breed.