When gas hits $5, just how much cheaper will it be to live in the country?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Beeman, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I've always said that the mass exodus of the cities for the back to the earth people was fueled by cheap gas. It will be interesting to see how the work in the city to live in the country fare when gas rises or shortages start.
     
  2. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    my guess would be most folks will be forced to move to the city (which is what the govt is after anyway)..

    Which is one reason I wish to have everything paid for BEFORE our move.. Then it really won't matter much if we don't get to town
     

  3. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    I live in the boonies and work in the boonies (10 min drive, or 1 hour bikeride at a leisurly pace). Spirits willing, that will all stay this way.

    Kaza
     
  4. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My husband will need to use the car and buy a moped or motorcycle....its 8 miles for him to work....
    3/4 ton truck sucks on gas but....we are free and clear of debt and I'm learning to shop for longer periods (6weeks). Hubby does drive buy a small grocer on way home and have an even smaller one 1/2m away(pricier too).

    Our goats are going to do more lawn mowing this summer :p Fences on the gardens and gas for tiller and chainsaw is more important than the manicured lawn we used to keep.
     
  5. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Increasing fuel prices affect heavily those who chose to commute to work -- regardless if they live in town or in the country.

    Homesteaders may well NOT work in town, perhaps preferring to forgo income or perhaps doing some income-producing activity at home or nearby. If our “commute to work” is measured in feet instead of miles, the increase in fuel cost has no effect upon our commuting expense.

    Those who chose to simply live in rural areas for the ambiance may become dissuaded by high commuting costs. In that case they may well choose to sell the rural land and move into or close to town.

    A friend who sells a lot of rural real estate says that he is seeing a trend of greater demand for smaller parcels close to town and less demand for land a little farther out and for larger parcels.

    This trend, if continued, seems advantageous for the homesteaders who have little reason to drive to town for work or other reasons (not that any of us enjoy high fuel prices -- unless we own oil company stock or make money in the business) .
     
  6. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    Maybe, it'll force people to work from their homes. I work & shop mostly from my computer. Just don't have time to drive places anyway. Saves me $$ by buying online. Some places, ship for free if you order a certain amount and I always do that if I can. I do my banking online, pay my bills online and order my horse feed and shavings by telephone and have it delivered. Shopping online can save you money, but always check out the shipping cost first.

    We live only 6 miles from the nearest town, and when we lived without a vehicle for 8 months, DH rode his bike for supplies. But we have elderly parents and cannot be without a vehicle right now. Though we try not to go anywhere unless we really need something.
     
  7. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    I live in the country and is no big deal I am retired so I don't work only go into town once or 2 times a week for food stuffs. won;t bother me hardly at all.
     
  8. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Like Pc dreams said it will be just want the gov wants to have everyone living in town it will be that much easier to force vaccinate them or "chip" them when the time comes. And of course control their movements. I posted on this topic recently in another thread like obser1 was saying for people that own their places free and clear and grow their own food gas could disapear entirely and they would hardly notice, Just work form home or do odd jobs for retired people in the country who have income.You dont need much $ if you go off grid and have your own water source and grow your food/own your own place. People would do well to make it their top priority to pay off their places NOW even if it means selling and moving to 2 acres on a trailer or living in town for a few years temporarily (if their is still time for that before the coming crash)
     
  9. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I put in an application at where I had worked nearly 20 yrs. Its closer by 10 miles to home. Should start at the same as im makeing now and go up as to where im top ended now, and with overtime to boot if I want it as opposed to no overtime where im at now. Also, im looking at a cycle to further save money. I know that my current gas bill per week is $50+. THats $200 a month and more. If I can get my monthy payments significantly below that, then I save even more, plus have an extra means of transportation, plus save wear and tear on my pk. I rode Honda 350 from 74 to 79, so Ive had some experience. I want to get the payments down yet have it paid off in 3 yrs amd that before I retire at 62. Im 58 now
     
  10. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hubby commutes 45 minutes one way. He drives a small, fuel efficient car which we are about to trade in for another small, fuel efficient vehicle. In less than two years he will retire. Gas at $5 a gallon won't bother us much since we seldom go anywhere anyway. I can make a full tank in the truck last a month.
     
  11. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    I drive 50 miles to work everyday (25 miles one way), and I'd only return to the city kicking and screaming. I combat the high prices by driving a '05 diesel bug. It gets around 46 miles to the gallon (500 -600 to the tank) depending on how I drive. Also have a diesel F-250 I use for toting my Dexter's around. It doesn't get the mileage that the bug does, but does better than a gasser.

    An investment making my own bio-diesel in the near future doesn't seem like a bad idea.
     
  12. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Free delivery will be a distant memory. Always remember that the people delivering and the goods they deliver will cost much more with $5 a gal. fuel. Every thing and I mean everything will increase in cost as the fuel goes up every penny from here.
    I always enjoy the when everything is paid off thinking. The taxes will increase tremendously as every municipality will have tremendously increased fuel costs from heating the buildings to running the trucks and school buses. Remeber that rural area have a lot of roads to maintain and a need for school buses that travel a lot of mileage.
    I don't think retired people will have much expendable income when driving, heating their home and taxes starts eating up their expendable income.
    Making bio diesel from?? I don't think food places are going to be selling as much so the demand for their used oil might make them start charging for it.
     
  13. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    Probably so, but should still be cheaper to purchase used cooking oil than $5 diesel. Diesel is projected to get more expensive in the near future due to requirements for a cleaner burning diesel (so they say) :shrug: . Diesel also dictates commerce, so everything with be more expensive. Tough times ahead no doubt.
     
  14. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    I think that many of us will be investigating bio-diesel and other alternative fuels for diesel engines. Diesels will run on a wide range of fuels, some of which are easy to produce AND the engines are more mechanically efficient than gasoline engines.

    Americans got a bad taste for diesel cars in the 80s when some very poor "diesel" engines (reworked gas engines) were offered -- and failed miserably. Diesels are also known to be "hard starting" (most Cummins diesel owners would disagree), and too noisy for some ears (ditto about Cummins, also true for the new VW bug diesel owners).

    Friends our ours have a new bug diesel that the say gets 50 mpg and is so quiet and so peppy (diesels are known for torque not speed) that after driving it I asked if it was really a diesel.
     
  15. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    I was talking to DH about this very thing today. We know folks who drive 100 miles each way to work daily. Can you imagine what that's costing, even with a fuel efficient vehicle?

    My Jeep is spending more time in the garage these days. Even with DHs little 4 cylinder, we make sure we get everything in 1 trip to town. He works part-time in town, so he gets to do the grocery stops for bread & milk now. LOL, it just occurred to me, a loaf of bread is $2, a gallon of milk is $3+ and a gallon of gas is $3 = almost $10 to go buy a loaf of bread and a gallon of milk. Ouch!
     
  16. FourDeuce

    FourDeuce Five of Seven Supporter

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    It may have been "fueled" by cheap gas, but I think there were a LOT of other factors involved. If the price of gas was the only factor, then people might move back when the price of gas went up, but most people I know who move to the country have plenty of solid reasons, and they'd probably be willing to pay for the "cost" of living in the country. Like the credit card commercial says, some things are priceless. :cowboy:
     
  17. Aunt Elner

    Aunt Elner Well-Known Member

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    When gasoline prices increase; the cost of food in the stores will also increase, r/t transportation costs; therefore, any food you are able to produce on your country place will also increase in value.

    If your country home has timber on it, you can heat with wood. Yes; a chainsaw does burn gasoline; but it is still much cheaper than heating your home with propane, natural gas or electricity. Corn furnaces are also an option; if you have acreage enough to grow corn. The cost to produce an acre of corn is much less than the cost to heat with petroleum/petroleum produced products.
     
  18. georgiarebel

    georgiarebel Well-Known Member

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    I've never got 50 mpg because it is so peppy. (Hard to keep my foot out of it). Told myself I was going to test myself and drive the speed limit and shift when I'm supposed to shift to see how many miles I get. I've got up to 600 miles to the tank so far. Really impressed with the torque in 4th and 5th gear. Never had a 4th cyl I didn't have to shift down in to pass in those gears. Mazda can keep their zoom...zoom,
     
  19. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    I think, on the total average of homesteaders in the country, it will still be much cheaper to live in the country.

    When gas goes up, delivery goes up...then almost eveything you buy goes up. Clothing, food, etc.

    But if you have a garden, you have alot of food you don't have to buy.

    If you use a wood stove, or have solar panels, ect. that is going to help a homesteader from the elevated cost.

    It is not just gas going up, it affects everything, so if we are in the country we are still better off.
     
  20. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    I use to do that (when gas was less than a buck). I'd drive 110 miles to work drive another 200 at work then 110 back home 5 and sometimes 6 days a week.. That got old after about 6 months,oil changes every couple weeks and a blown motor..

    I quit that job about the time gas jumped to over $2.. I was loosing about 1k a month on gas (and this is after we moved back to the area).. Nothing like working for a living and spending it all for gas. LOL