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I admit...I have no clue beyond my own 2 kids, and mine were talking a LOT by 3. my little grandbaby will be 3 next month....nothing. background...he did stop breathing when a newborn, and they brought him back. his pediatrician finally gave DD a place to call for intensive testing. one thing in particular..his hearing. he seems to want to ...but his words come out in a garble. he is often frustrated....which is likely since he can't quite communicate. anyone here deal with something similar? has anyone had a child that just didn't want to talk until later?
 

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My grandson Zach, wouldn't talk. She had his hearing checked and everything. He finally had to go to speach therapy when he was 4 just to get his talk cleared up. He couldn't say R's and certain starts of words. Now he's in 1st grade and he tells you everything you ever wanted to know about everything he knows anything about. In other words he's a talker indeed.

Now I have a grandson who is 2 and won't talk much. But I think it's because his daddy is hispanic and the little guy is trying to learn to speak 2 languages at a time. He says a few words in English and in Spanish.

Rosemary
 

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Does he say anything? Mamas and dadas even? My little sister had horrible ear infections and was nearly deaf but no one knew until she was three or four. Then she had tubes put in her ears, and her hearing improved drastically. She was able to say a few words, whether she picked them up before her hearing got as bad or if she just figured them out I'm not sure. Definitely get the hearing checked. My sister is 20 now, and she struggled in school because her language skills were set so far back.

Kayleigh
 

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DS was hard of hearing, and he was really struggling when he was 3.

Has he had hearing tests? Even if they did test him, the tests will be incomplete because a toddler will only hold still for so long. My own son has what they call a "cookie cutter" hearing loss, meaning he tests out better on some frequencies than others. Alas, the frequencies they tested on were his strongest, so the hearing loss was a good deal worse than they had thought.

Kids should either walk OR talk by their first birthday. They usually do the other several months later.
 

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I had one who could talk in complete sentences before she could walk, and she could walk at 9 months! I had another who only did sound affects until about age 3, then started talking in complete senteces and taught himself to read when he was 4. Then the other two were more "typical". Of course my adopted daughter came to us already fully conversant (in Chinese) and learned to communicate in English in 6 to 8 weeks. They have all had their own pace. They are all doing fine. :)

Cindyc.
 

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I agree, get the hearing checked. But be very careful with the other testings. Here's why I say this. My DS didn't talk until he was 5 yrs old. He has a pragmatic language delay. I had him tested by 7 different specialists before finding out what all was wrong with him and got 7 different diagnosis. Everything from mental retardation to autism. When a child is language delayed many will automatically try to list them as autistic, and that's not always the case. Before accepting that the child may be autistic make sure they do a CARS test on him. CARS is children's autistic rating scale. The ones that tried to tell me my DS was autistic never even tested him for autism. But we were going through the public school system to have him tested and I found out later that they will get extra funds for a child who is autistic. So please, research what they say and see if it fits. Get more than one opinion. Autism is a diagnosis that stays with a child for life, because there is no cure for autism. Once labeled as such you could hinder that child's future as for as career choices etc. Sorry, don't mean to sound like an alarmist, but I went through 3 years of h --- on earth trying to get help and a diagnosis for my son.
 

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Our oldest was like that. Since he was about 13 months old we'd been telling the doctors his tongue wasn't working right, they disagreed. He had breast-fed and bottle-fed normally for birth and the family doctors said this meant his tongue was fine. They told us he was partly deaf, needed hearing tubes, etc. etc. ENT specialist said the same. We could tell he was hearing very well. We pushed for over a year before getting a referral to a specialist at Sick Kids in Toronto. Doctor looked in his mouth for 5 seconds and determined he was tongue-tied. Did 4 hours of hearing tests on him, his hearing was fine. He was frustrated, mumbling, couldn't make the right sounds to make words. We could make out a few things that he was saying but nobody else could.

In September this year at 29 months old he had a 5 minute surgery to untie his tongue, we could clearly understand over 50 words within a week and he's almost speaking normally for his age group now.


It could well be your grandson's hearing, or something within the structure of his tongue or mouth, or some combination, or something else entirely. This was just our experience.
 

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Did they teach him baby sign language

I have seen in my own family and many other that when children are tought that they speek later, rather then earlier
 

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My youngest didn't talk until about 18 months, but then it was full sentences and paragraphs, but only when she was excited about something. Of course, she would point at an object and her older sister "translated" for her, so she didn't have to strain her voice:D

One day the sister was on time out and the younger one grabbed a toy away from her and said, "You are on time-out. You don't get toys while on time out. So just sit there and be quiet." My friend and I looked at each other, rendered speech less. Finally, I managed" "Hey, she can talk." Then she was quiet for a few weeks until the next episode. Fast forward 13 years and she never shuts up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks. Sonshine...autism has been a thought. it is normal thinking ...as he also has terrible outbursts of temper. BUT...it isn't something that we will label him with without extensive testing for everything/anything else. I assure you. it is so uplifting to hear that some children just talk at their own pace...thanks again..I needed your input. they will first test his hearing. I will say that sometimes he doesn't respond...which puts hearing first on the agenda. poor little guy..is soooo dear. so bright in all other areas.

he has the gift of amazing parents, and the 'village' of extended family...no matter what the diagnosis. :)

he does sometimes say some words. he says 'shoes'...when he wants to go outside. it's so limited, but what he does say comes out clear. it's just that there is no sentences...no real response to people...no conversation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Did they teach him baby sign language

I have seen in my own family and many other that when children are tought that they speek later, rather then earlier
I am old fashioned. lol having been in the hearing industry for years...I still do not feel that baby sign language is a good thing. talking is. period. sign language is for hearing impaired. I know sign language...but I'm not for replacing it with speech in babies. just my opinion, cause I know it is the rage among young parents. I'm not bashing it...this is just my own opinion that matters...not. :)
 

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I know sign language...but I'm not for replacing it with speech in babies.
The two should be used simultaneously. The child, mimicking the adult, will also use the two simultaneously. "Do you want some milk?" while giving the sign for milk. Which, in my kid's case, came out like *sign for milk* "May-peas, May-peas" (milk, please)

Autism--Keep in mind, autism is a spectrum disorder. Not every autistic kid is RainMan. ;) Some are so mild that they aren't even recognized by the general public as such. It's just nice for parents, teachers, etc. to know so that they realize that this kid is managing the world in a different way than most kids.

That said,
You've described my son. (Now almost 9).
He started "talking" at about a year, but you couldn't understand a thing he said! That was true until he was well over three. He was just over four when he was getting to the point that other people could understand him. As in, those who didn't communicate with him on a regular basis.
He was also prone to temper outbursts. Frustrated, of course, with the stupidity of parents who couldn't figure out what he was so obviously saying. :p
Even by four, "Wan dat, Mom" was still about the extent of his conversation, while his then two-year-old sister was practically reciting Shakespeare. :rolleyes:

We started signing with him around two so that he could ask for the basics. Milk, crackers, hungry, water, play, movie, etc.
He remained in Speech until second semester, when he was a second grader.
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Basic child development (I'm an elementary teacher, but my endorsement area is Early Childhood)--

Speech is a fine motor development (the small muscles of the tongue and lips). Basic physiology says that males tend to be more adept at gross motor while females are more adept at fine motor. Girls tend to talk younger, and more clearly, than boys.

Socially speaking, girls are also more likely to transfer from solitary and parallel play into associative and cooperative play at younger ages than boys.
Girls will be playing house at five (cooperative), where boys are often still playing trucks in a parallel or associative play fashion.
His "no real response to people" might be a sign of disorder, but it might also be a sign of perfectly normal, but delayed, development.
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After having his hearing checked, I would next get him tested for Early Intervention. (I can't even begin to tell you how many times I've wished I demanded EI for my son's speech).
Language development is a series of steps from the very beginning of babbling on into reading. It's very common that children who were speech delayed will continue on with other language delays, like being slow to read and/or write fluently and so on.
 

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Well I am the child I know hehehe. I could not hear so therefore could not pronounce my words because I couldn't hear. I could pass hearing tests by lip reading. I was in first grade. My mother gave me the phone when I was little and I got highly angry and said NO TALK NO TALK and slammed the phone down. She called back and had the person scream talk and I said NO TALK NO TALK and slammed the phone down again. They took me to get my hearing checked in a room where I could not lip read because the person was on the outside talking in a speaker. I failed horribly. I was almost deaf in both ears. They tried hearing aids they didn't work because it made the backround noise louder so it jumbled the close noises. Then one day my hearing all went to my right ear. So I can hear a little less than everyone else out of my right ear and I cannot hear out of my left. So it works well enough to communicate with someone which I am glad. I would get his hearing checked soon. Some people today will sit left of me and think I am rude for not talking back to them and I have to apologize and tell them I just couldn't hear because I am deaf. So everyone who knows me well now sits right of me when talking.
 

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I would also have his hearing checked. My dd was talking well in the beginning but at about 2 1/2 she started not repeating words--basicaly using the other words she had learned.. We found out that she had wax hardening in her ears --she could feel vibarations but not real sounds! She had minor surgery to remove the wax, up on alleregy meds and she gradually gained her hearing and resumed her learning..
 

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My grand nephew is 3. He'll be 4 in March. When I had him almost all last year, he could barely talk. He tried, but not much was understandable. Now, a year later, he's talking much better. My nephew did have his hearing checked twice and he tested fine, but the doctor did say that he wanted to monitor his hearing for the next couple of years, since it's hard to get a clear reading on a toddler.
 

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I admit...I have no clue beyond my own 2 kids, and mine were talking a LOT by 3. my little grandbaby will be 3 next month....nothing. background...he did stop breathing when a newborn, and they brought him back. his pediatrician finally gave DD a place to call for intensive testing. one thing in particular..his hearing. he seems to want to ...but his words come out in a garble. he is often frustrated....which is likely since he can't quite communicate. anyone here deal with something similar? has anyone had a child that just didn't want to talk until later?
Sounds like my son. He didn't even do the baby babble, which had us worried. He did start to talk after he was three, but it was difficult to understand him. Eventually, we got him into a remedial speech class, which helped a lot.

Had I known then what I know now, I would have had him in the class earlier. Three was too young, but he was six when we started. Four or five would have been better.

Btw - he was never much of a talker, but now he can talk my ear off! Of course, he is 18 now. :D
 

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mamita,
You also need to remember that boys talk later than girls normally. He may just be a late talker. :) There's a book called "Late Talking Children" written by Thomas Sowell that I found very informative and helped lead me to finally getting a diagnosis for my DS and the help he needed.
 

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I haven't read the responses becaues I am short on time but my sister's boy didn't talk at 3. He only grunted and pointed, no talking, no babling. He was surrounded by older (and younger) children and adults but still didn't speak. Long story short there is nothing wrong with him mentally and has made great improvements with speech therapy. He started when he was 3 and is a little over 5 now. You still can not understand him very well and he is starting to get frustrated but my sister still takes him twice a week and he continues to improve. He is a very "physical" boy. He is a "worker", he brings in the wood for the fire, tries to "fix" things for his mom, and spends his days building things (I got him a tool set with adult tools for his 4th birthday, he still uses it every day). He also excells at sports. I am thinking with continued speech therapy it will all catch up in the end.
 

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Our son is 2 1/2 years old and he doesn't talk much. He understands everything and gets his point across. But actually he is picking up more words and saying more things recently. I figure by this time next year he will be talking our ears off. LOL So I am enjoying this time right now when he is just saying a few word sentences.
 
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