Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,207 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When its cold
when its hot
when its hooked up to cyl
when it has something lifted
when it has lifted and now lowered something??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,996 Posts
I think most suggest with everything external lowered?

If you are hooking up a new cylinder and working the air out, I would check the oil level again after the cylinder got the air bled out.

Will kinda depend on the tractor, one of mine has a whole gallon of fluid, another has 15 gallons in the rear tranny/sump. One I need to keep on top of, the other they suggest can be overfilled by a gallon, and will go a long time without worry.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
I think most suggest with everything external lowered?

If you are hooking up a new cylinder and working the air out, I would check the oil level again after the cylinder got the air bled out.

Will kinda depend on the tractor, one of mine has a whole gallon of fluid, another has 15 gallons in the rear tranny/sump. One I need to keep on top of, the other they suggest can be overfilled by a gallon, and will go a long time without worry.

Paul
My AGCO takes 38 gallons. Makes for expensive blowouts if you don't catch them fast.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,207 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Ive always filled it before I started it up. I just wanted to know what others thought.

Im confused, whats so hard about that. lol
 

·
Retired farmer-rancher
Joined
·
3,022 Posts
Retract all remote cylinders, warm or cold, to avoid overfilling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
Retract all remote cylinders, warm or cold, to avoid overfilling.
I disagree slightly... When you have equipment attached, always fill the tractor with the implement in the position you leave it in when it's unhooked, whether it's extended or retracted. That way it's consistent even if you switch tractors. If you fill with everything retracted, then unhook with some extended, you're leaving oil behind from tractor #1 and potentially adding to tractor 2 when you hook it up.
Not a big deal for most here who probably only ever deal with a couple of cylinders per implement but it's a good habit to get into in case you have to deal with larger equipment and lots of cylinders or bigger cylinders.
A couple of my implements hold close to 5 gallons in their lines and cylinders so it can make a difference.
 

·
Retired farmer-rancher
Joined
·
3,022 Posts
I disagree slightly... When you have equipment attached, always fill the tractor with the implement in the position you leave it in when it's unhooked, whether it's extended or retracted. That way it's consistent even if you switch tractors. If you fill with everything retracted, then unhook with some extended, you're leaving oil behind from tractor #1 and potentially adding to tractor 2 when you hook it up.
Not a big deal for most here who probably only ever deal with a couple of cylinders per implement but it's a good habit to get into in case you have to deal with larger equipment and lots of cylinders or bigger cylinders.
A couple of my implements hold close to 5 gallons in their lines and cylinders so it can make a difference.
You are right. I always retracted all cylinders before unhooking , as a matter of habit, and I guess I assumed everyone else did the same. This usually prevented intermixing hydraulic oils..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,944 Posts
if your cylinders are double acting it wouldn't matter. The cylinder is full of oil either way minus a small amount for the shaft when the cylinder is retracted.
You will get the oil from the shaft side of the cylinder into the tractor operating the cylinder as soon as the lever is moved to extend the cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,944 Posts
Haven't used a single acting cylinder on an implement since 84
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Find out what the owners manual requires. It made a big difference on the jd 310b backhoe. It seemed the backhoe was always running low while operating. The book requires engine running front bucket on the ground and backhoe in transport position. We had always just pulled the dip stick before cranking at the begining of the day and this wasn't quite right. Find out what is require in the owners manual would be what I would do. Also checking oil cold or hot makes no difference to me just check the oil. I try to pull the stick at the start of the day but will pull it during a long day if the tractor shows signs of a problem.

Bellcow
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,207 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I don't have a owners manual for a 48 H Farmall. Dad had one for his 48 H, that my bro has/had? But, I don't.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top