Wheat and other grains suitability?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dirtywhitellama, Sep 4, 2006.

  1. dirtywhitellama

    dirtywhitellama I don't have llamas.

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    When I buy a big ol bag of wheat for my ducks, and it comes whole but threshed, would that wheat have any possible treatments or anything on it that would make it unsuitable for throwing in our grinder and making flour out of it? OR would I just have to look through and pick out bug bits and other unsavory items and it would be good to go?

    (Same question also with oats - tho they usually come with their shells on - and other grains)
     
  2. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Grains that are destined for feed are considered "feed grains" and are usually of #2 quality. Flour grains would be number one.

    Number one grain might even have not been cleaned/screened and readied for grinding.

    Either could have been farm or warehouse stored with approved insecticides used to control damage.

    While the grain I put into a farm bin was usually seed wheat I typically dribbled in a solution of malathion as recommended by the extension service. The bin was cleaned and sprayed prior to filling as well.

    What comes out of the combine? Little pieces parts of anything that goes into the header as the grain is cut. However it does go through a sieve and a fanning process before going into the bin.

    Elevators typically blend wheat by dropping two streams from overhead bins into their pit. As it drops breezes sweeping into the elevator a carry away some of the chaff and fines that were in the grain.

    When we took seed wheat in for cleaning prior to planting a 200 bushel truckload would yield 50 to 150 pounds of fines, chaff, unthreshed heads, grasshopper parts, weed seed, etc. We always kept this to use as chicken feed over the winter.

    Could you use what you have--sure, try a batch. You can always sift out the bigger stuff.
     

  3. dirtywhitellama

    dirtywhitellama I don't have llamas.

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    So basically feed grain and flour grain wouldn't likely have been treated significantly differently?

    If "number one" grain may not have been cleaned or screened then what is the difference between one and two?


    I did work at an elevator one summer, I know just how many grasshopper parts (and live grasshoppers) go down the chute. I always tried to save the live grasshoppers I saw but my arms are only so long (and there were more than I could reach before it dropped too low anyway). It was a slow elevator and there wasn't any rush to get out of the way for the next truck most of the time.
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I did this once. I didn't see any bug parts in my sack of grain, but I DID see a LOT of weed seeds!

    Not knowing if the seeds were edible or not, I carefully picked them out, and then I rinsed the grain before using it.

    I can now buy whole grain in a health food store, so I no longer bother with the 50 pound bags of wheat. A small bag of grain is much easier to store.
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I've eaten feed wheat. Just don't get seed wheat as that may be treated. I winnowed it in front of a fan and it was fine. Oat hulls are bitter and nasty tasting and really hard to remove. You might try steamed and rolled oats and winnow that. Walmart in Vernal carried 25# bags of rolled oats at a good price so I never used the feed store oats for groceries.