Whats your daily feeding regimen? (if you didn't have pasture)

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    I am curious, another post gave me an idea for an interesting post. What is your feeding regime for your farm? When do you feed them, times, etc. I know everyone has a different feeding time, different ways to do things. Curious to see what everyone does, because I know some feed TMR's, some feed P-TMR's, such as I.'


    What I do:


    When we feed, it is 1pm, every day, they have feed access 24 hours (haylage they eat like grain), but the hay is always there. I start at 1 with the haylage, pull the 2 feed bunks into the silo room. Fire up the silo, fill them as I push them. Once filled we push the bunk down the ramp (metal framed feed bunks, I added wheels), rolls to a stop 30' away from the silo on the ramp, fill the 2nd and roll that down. Without stopping the silo (hate making motors stop and go) fill the cart, mix corn meal in. Stop the silo, take the cart out to the bunks, fill them. Go back in, fill the cart again, then feed the Jerseys some haylage, and feed the Jersey, 2 hereford heifers, and 3 steers plus a donkey their stuff. The donkey eats very little, but seems to enjoy it. I run 4 wheelbarrow fulls to them. Then i'm done with feeding, till 5pm. In between there, clean then go to the house. We come back down about 5, get the grain in front of the 4 Jerseys, take 5 bales to the herefords. Take 2 bales to the small group, some carrys over to the next day. Then take 2 bales to the holsteins. Usually ill run 2 more wheel barrow fulls to the holsteins (they are getting bigger, and eating more, which is good! I don't want haylage left over). Usually they eat 1.5 bales, so sometimes the following day I don't need to pack the feeders seen in the pics i've posted. My feed program is fast, no machinery used (outside the silo), which is handy. Considering the only break down might be a tire (outside the silo). The fact I don't have a lot of animals (37), it isn't hard.

    So my herefords (adults) average about 60-65lbs, some do eat more than others like the bull. The holsteins average about 20-25lbs, and that number is increasing. Some are eating less, kahlua eats a lot, if she isn't laying down, she is eating. Feeding her grain is entertaining, ever watch a dog chow into food? Well, she does the same, huge mouth full then some trickles out. But the feeding regime I have, is paying off. Two I have been tapeing are gaining 2lbs or so a day, I'm very happy.


    Jeff
     
  2. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Cows get hay, horses get hay. Dont ever feed anything but hay unless we are finishing steers. Horses do get some oats if we have long days with them. Bulls might get some barley before breeding season. Depends on how they wintered.
     

  3. wheresdabeef

    wheresdabeef Member

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    I have 12 Angus steers on feed here in S.E. MI and my feed routine is as follows: I drive past the feedlot in my backyard at 6:00 a.m. in the morning when I get home from work, and usually again at around 5:00 p.m. in the evening when I leave for work, just to make sure their all there! I have a round bale feeder that I put small square bales of hay in about once a week, two 300 gallon tanks that have to be filled about once a week, and an 8000 lb. creep feeder that I usually have to get filled by the local co-op about once a month. I usually straw the barn every 3-4 days if it's wet. I have the co-op bring 6000lbs of ground corn, mixed with 500lb of 40% beef pellets, 50lb of minerals, and 50lb of salt, open the lid of the bunk, they auger it in and were on the way! I have been doing this for several years, and have had very good success! I get my calves from a fellow that has free range cattle when they are 300-400lbs and after 2-3 days of bawling for mom they settle in and go to town, those 2-3 days are nerve-wracking however! Every once in a while I will put 3-4 round bales of cornstalks in the lot to give them something to keep busy with.
     
  4. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    We feed at 9:30 am and again around 7 pm same routine
    Start out with feeding round bales to to the breeding herd only in the am , about every other day 3 or 4 depending on number of head out in the winter paddock eldest does that with youngest openg the gates ..

    front paddock where jr bull is for winter alng with a cow here for breeding gets about 3/4 bale of hay and bucket of corn chop

    in main barn .. knock down hay and straw through the drops .... then go down and stack that up , and feed out .. 2 year olds get their bunker filled 4/ 5 bales
    1st cutting ,
    then 2 more loafing pens of younger heifers get their hay bunkers topped off or cleaned and refilled as needed , horses that are being barned in teh winter (2 this year ) get their hay , and goat gets her hay ...horses let out when they finish hay ...

    We have a central storage bunk for chop feed .. holds 3 tons in the barn ,
    load it up from the top barn floor , access in aisle below .. I feed chop by bucket to the barned animals 5 scoops to the bucket rough 7 pounds /scoop , I weigh it periodically as feed stuffs do change on availability .. basically we use 3 to 1 cob corn and spelts .. but can vary oats or shell corn depending if I am show fitting .... or any other feed I find ( we some times get the chaff from williams brothers flour mill in kent ..its free for the hauling .. sometimes its very heavy with wheat , sometimes its mostly chaff and junk ... when its heavy wheat use it in feed mixes .. when its chaffy use it for bedding )
    mix in the chop.. minerals ,salt and 40% beef pellets to bring mix up to rough 16 % protein .. again get it tested from time to time ....we grind and mix our own
    ohh we also add in 50 lbs of baking soda to keep anything from spoiling when using cob corn from the free standing cribs .. when the weather is damp,helps cut down on mold... and teh chop from heating up in the wood storage bunk

    All barned cattle get chop in bunkers enough that they clean up in half hour .. youngest ones have available all time ..

    then I clear and fill water tanks .. use half of 55 gallan drums .. never cracked one yet , beating out ice . horses get their grain .. corn and spelts goat hers .. chop , and then I tend any special cases .. like sick critters if any

    do a walk through of breeding herd (they have spring that never freezes )

    muck out stalls in am .. straw down .. sweep floors total time about 1 hour .. evening same routine .. but mostly just topping off

    when my cow is fresh .. I add in milking to schedule ..

    Paula
    Hyde Park Farm
     
  5. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I feed at 5:00 pm during the weekday and around 3:00 pm on the weekends. Cows have access to pasture all day long, what there is of it right now. I feed 25 pounds of grass hay, 3 pounds each of canola meal and ground peas (both of which are free). For the steer that I am fattening I feed 25 pounds of grass hay, 4 pounds each of canola meal and ground peas and 10 pounds of ground barley. Starting next week I will up the barley to around 20 pounds for about 3 weeks to finish him out before butchering.

    BobG
     
  6. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Bob,

    Have you a bit of experience feeding barley? Ever have any issues? We feed it to finishing steers but certainly must keep an eye on it. Its pretty hot and they can go off easily when you push it.

    I dont know too many people that finish on it. I would pass on it and stick with corn if it wa an option. I like the corn finish better. We arent in corn country though.
     
  7. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Opus,

    When I lived in MT near Billings we fed 1500 calves during the winter to keep us busy. We fed corn silage and barley. I also ran 50 cow/calf pairs for my Mom and fed alfalfa and barley until they reached 800 pounds then sold them to the local cattle buyer. My wife's Grandpa who I worked for would feed his steers he was going to butcher for personal use over 30 pounds of barley a day for the last 30 days. I am now in the Palouse area south of Spokane and you can buy corn, but it is over $10/50 pounds. I can buy barley for $2.50/50 pounds and then run it through a hammer mill before feeding it. When I was still at home we raised ear corn for our hogs and would feed some to the calves during the winter, but mostly it was barley. We never had any problems with it, but I know guys that did if they would increase the amount of barley too much at one time.

    BobG
     
  8. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Barley is certainly cheapest. Dont let a novice feed it full ration though. We have had a couple problems, nothing serious though. I would love to have silage handy, great stuff.
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I am impressed by how hard you guys work at feeding and it makes me a bit embarrassed with my weak efforts doing the rotational grazing.
     
  10. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Dont be! Rotational grazing takes a lot of management when done right.
     
  11. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

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    Start around 7-7:30 after kids are on Bus. Clean of milking stalls,tie in cows,milk first cow. AS fritzy is being milked(bucket milker/pipeline)clean out hay leaves. With our current hay they seem to eat all the stems and leave the leaves?? Feed outside lot 2 buckets of leaves,2 bucket of grower - 16%cracked corn mix, tie horse up while the heifers eat. Start 2nd cow milking, finishing cleaning out hay take to younger heifers. Start third cow, grain the two lots of smaller heifers (calf starter, blend). Start the third cow, carry in baleage and dry hay for milk cows. Start fourth cow, fork off hay to smaller heifers. MIlk last two cows as clean their pen and rebed it. Feed cats, dogs, chicken, collect eggs, and check on lil' one sleeping in the house. Feed milk to baby calves in huts and hogs. Then grain, hay, water, and bed the calf hutches. Go in have another pot of Coffee, get little one ready and go to the dairy to finish milking and chores. After Dinner due what needs to be done fill water tanks, work with heifers, clean clip ect.Wife milks and feed the babies at night, checks the heifers. Soon we will have show heifers to tie in and individually feed. Then more leading practice in afternoons! It is a fine tuned performance, yet I find time to do this??
     
  12. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Agmantoo,

    I rotational graze during the summer also. I only have six head on seven acres, but I have plenty of grass and also cut hay on three of those acres in the spring. I have since come across another six acres that I can have for free. Too bad I sold my two bred heifers last fall because I didn't have enough hay and land to handle them.

    Bob
     
  13. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    Many feedings of PMR and hay per day, and every chance I get I'm sweep the mangers in front of the cows pushing the feed back to them.

    4:00 AM Sweep mangers in front of cows

    4:15 AM Feed steers

    4:30 AM With stationary mixer in commodity shed, mix total daily PMR for milk cows (high moisture shell corn, rolled oats, cottonseed, protein supplement, buffer, minerals/vitamins, haylage). Feed first of four roughly equal daily feedings of PMR. Feed cart has weigh scale. Cows fed according to production and stage of lactation

    5:00 AM Feed dry cows feed and 1st crop grass hay to dry cows in dry cow barn. Cows are in stalls, so feed based on cow and time to calving.

    5:15 AM Sweep mangers and feed approx. 2 lbs/cow of choice alfalfa hay.

    5:30 AM Start milking. Wife feeds calves and growing heifers grain and hay.

    7:30 AM Finished milking and sweep mangers

    7:30 AM Morning hog chores (about 1 hour and then breakfast)

    9:00 AM Sweep mangers. Feed beef cows square bales of grass hay. Wife cleans milkers and milk room.

    9:30 AM Feed equivalent of 2 lbs./cow haylage in feed bunk inside silo shed for lactating cows. Lactating cows leave barn. Clean barn (barn cleaner and manure pump), bed stalls, lime. Feed second feeding of PMR (cows fed according to production)in dairy barn. My wife will watch for bullers while the cows are out.

    10:15-10:30 Depending on weather, lactating cows back in barn.

    10:45 AM Sweep manger in dry-cow barn and clean out dry cow barn (barn cleaner and spreader).

    11:15 AM Sweep mangers in dairy barn, offer small amount of grass-alfalfa mix hay.

    12:15 PM Sweep mangers in dairy barn and then in to dinner.


    2:00 PM Sweep mangers and Third feeding of PMR to dairy cows.

    2:30 PM Line-up work for hired man and get down square bales of hay for night feeding.

    3:30 PM Hired man checks in and does night feeding of steers and beef cows. Sweep mangers and offer more grass hay as needed.

    4:00 PM Feed dry cows. Wife starts with night feeding of calves. Feed lactating sows.

    4:30 PM Feed final feeding of PMR to dairy cows and then in to supper.

    5:30 PM Sweep mangers and offer 2 lbs/cow of alfalfa hay. Milk. Hired man gets square bales of hay ready for next day’s feedings and any grinding for hogs or steers.

    7:30 PM Finish milking and sweep mangers.

    9:00 PM Sweep manger and offer final feeding of grass-alfalfa hay and go to bed.

    Hired man will stay until around 11:00 PM usually and sweep mangers twice more, work in shop. (He’s restoring my Super M right now.)

    During rest of day, grind feed, change doors in silos, clean as needed.
    During field work and haying , I’ll usually have another hired man during the day or at least the afternoon, and my wife will do the chores after the cows come back in the barn. In summer, the cows will stay out longer during the mid-day and get fed square bales of hay outside.
     
  14. BDB

    BDB BDB

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    5:00 am feed the cows each half bale hay 4 quarts a grain to cow that just calved feed the sheep half bale a hay each get a handful grain in winter feed the pig 4 to 6 quarts a grain then off to work for me

    10:00 am my wife feeds the cows another bale hay and the sheep another half bale a hay

    3:30 pm i get home feed the cows another half bale a hay and 4 quarts a grain to the cow with calve feed the sheep half a bale hay and a handfull grain each feed the pig 4 to 6 quarts grain plus any table scraps top off all the animals water

    7:30 pm throw the cows another half bale a hay
     
  15. myersfarm

    myersfarm Dariy Calf Raiser

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    wow and i think i have a tuff day...i feed 6 jersey heifers there bottles three time a day and put out 8 round bales hay when i get to it...i have grass growing now...i dried up my milking herd this winter so thats it.....check the fence charger make sure it working....watch opra i tape so i can watch when i have time....give the horses some grain when i feed the calfs there second bottle..ride thought the herd checking for new calfs..had one yesterday...cut and ear tag them..
     
  16. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    When I go out in the morning, I do a quick check for any problems. The cows are calving, so I make sure no one is having a hard time, note any that look like they are going to go that day and notice new ones.

    I don't feed until about 3pm. I turn on the belt feeder, switch to the cow side, turn on the unloader and let the silage go. I have to keep an eye on it as it likes to stick or cause other problems. It won't do it for weeks, so I think I can do something else when it's running. HA! It just waits for moments like that.

    Then I switch it to the feedlot side and run their silage. Then I fill up buckets for the feeders and dump those on the belt.

    While the mommas are eating, I go out and tag any new calves, check for scours and just give them a look over. I have one this year...#511...who comes barreling up to me everytime I walk out there. He's so funny. It looks like he's going to take me out, but he just wants a scratch. I've never had one so friendly...I know it won't last.

    On my way back in, I check the mommas as they are all conveniently lined up with their rears facing me to see if those who should have cleaned, have and to check for who's going to go next. I also go down the feedlot side just to check on them.

    Jena
     
  17. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    WI
    Same routine 7am and 7pm

    Mix multi gallons (based on head count) of milk replacer.

    Pull wagon with full bottles to barn, and place one bottle in rack on pen gate door.

    While they are eating, feed hay/feed/water to weaned steers.

    Clean out and rebed weaned steer pens

    Fill water with hose in winter (auto in summer)

    Collect empty bottles and feed handful of starter feed to each calf. Change water in their buckets.

    Clean and rebed calf pens

    We make a few additional trips to check on calves and deal with all those other little things.
     
  18. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Southeast Iowa
    I like only having a few animals! Lots of variety but only a few of each.

    Letssee, about 9am I got out with two calf bottles full of goat's milk. Feed the calves. Change rabbit waterers out with fresh ones and feed the bunnies. Give grain and hay to my mother-in-law's goat who's boarding here temporarily. Toss feed to the chickens and check for eggs (so far we're at about 5 minutes).

    Haul hay to the burro and sheep. I have a large metal garbage can and haul two packed ones full to them. This is from a round bale - they're cheaper and I don't have a bale feeder yet...

    Then on to the goat pen where I give them their grain in the feeder, check everyone over to see how they're coming (all four are preggers), move my alpaca cria to another area for feeding and pet the soft fuzz as he eats his grain. Check the automatic waters to be sure they're still clean and operating. Haul a fresh bucket of water and add some fresh grain to the calves (they're nibbling grain and ignoring the water so far). Put the buckets and garbage can away, collect the eggs I've found and go inside. Total of about 20 minutes, tops.

    Repeat the process around 4:30pm, though usually the children do that when they get home from school.

    When the goats freshen that time will increase with milking...to about 5 more minutes per goat, plus milk processing time inside.

    None of my buildings are more than 50 feet away from each other on less than 4 acres of land.

    -Sarah