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Discussion Starter #1
Curious what other gardeners consider as they're best all around paste type tomato variety? I've been growing a few different types each year here in South Jersey and without fail, the Paquebot Roma has been my best producing AND best tasting paste/Roma tomato. The pic below shows the Paquebot on the left and an Amish Paste on the R. On the outside they look similar in color, although the Paquebots are about 30% bigger on avg. with fewer seeds and less pulp
 

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I was going to say "Amish paste" but you have seemingly shot that down. Many of my Amish paste this year were quite large (12 to 14 ounces each at least), almost always had only three small interior chambers, minimal seeds and were very meaty. I was very happy with them.

I would be more than willing to try some Paquebot Romas for next year in further side by side testing if you are willing to part with some seeds. ;)

Or do I have to chase Martin down at the other website?

Assuming that Martin was the source....

TRellis
 

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San Marzono's hands down. Over the years I have tried several other paste tomatoes....San Marzono's so far, are the best!
 
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I was going to say "Amish paste" but you have seemingly shot that down. Many of my Amish paste this year were quite large (12 to 14 ounces each at least), almost always had only three small interior chambers, minimal seeds and were very meaty. I was very happy with them.

I would be more than willing to try some Paquebot Romas for next year in further side by side testing if you are willing to part with some seeds. ;)

Or do I have to chase Martin down at the other website?

Assuming that Martin was the source....

TRellis
Yep, Martins roma is the best for me this year. 1st time raising them but I definately will again. Too bad Martin isn't here to read this thread. He's a big loss for the HT forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
TRellis, I can do that, I need to save some fresh seed though...so it'll be a few months before they're ready. Send me a PM, we can set it up

These maters don't get anywhere near the size others have stated here with other varieties, but they make up the difference in taste, IMO

Tatiana's site gives this tomato a bum description, but this site gives a far better description of my results every year http://www.sherckseeds.com/pages/seeds/tomatoes/paquebot-roma-tomato/

They're my only base mater for Salsa and the best sketti sauce in the world:thumb:

Yep, the seed we're had thru Martin, as were about 100 other varieties grown here over the years. Not having him here for his advice on a daily basis really has been a big bad hit to this forum! I find myself coming here just to go through the older posts now to continue learning. Shame for new members who never got to pick his brain, the man knew (knows) EVERYTHING!

He's helped me put a LOT of food on my table over the years!!!
 

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We grew one called Juliet last year. Very small but there were so many per plant that they out-produced the others (San Marzano and another one I can't recall now). I also didn't need to cut off the stem end of these to make them into sauce which was a great time saver.

Maybe 2" long, an inch around.
 

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I have grown at least 10 different Pastes over the last 7-8 years. My favorites, on order are:

1. Rio Grande
2. San Marzano
3. Paquebots Roma
4. Opalka
5. Martino's Roma

I would add Amish Paste, but it doesn't really seem like a "paste" type tomato, but we grow it every year and think it is fabulous.
 

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Like a couple of others said here, San Marzano. In fact we had pasta with sauce made from our San Marzano tomatoes just last night. They are great, but still don't beat the San Marzanos grown in Italy in the Sarnese Nocerino area of Italy. They are grown in the shadows of Mt. Vesuvius, and the soil is especially rich in volcanic dust. Ours are grown in the shadows of Mt Pocono, which has yet to erupt. :D

Jim
 
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I always use the same tomato for sauces, salsa, and paste that I use for just plain eating. Yeah, it might take a few more tomatoes to cook down a batch, but I know my sauce, salsa, and everything else that I can is the taste of the best tomato(for me) that I know about.
Only the best for my wife, my family, and my friends. And myself, too.
 

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I love Juliets. They are prolific, tough, and delicious. They also blanche and peel better than any other tomato I've worked with.
I also like the striped or speckled Roma. They seem to do quite well up north and are delicious.

That said, I also find that a sauce which is a mix of several varieties is alway the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for everyone's input so far. I'm thinking I'll give the San Marzano a try next year along with the Paquebot Roma's. The tomato side of the garden is just about done for the season here. This year, the paquebots were the last to ripen since I got them planted so late in the spring. They're my last healthy maters in the garden right now. In years past, I've found that if I got them planted early they would set loads of blossoms and produce much earlier and continue right up till the frost

Lesson learned (Martin confirmed): get them in early, a week or 3 really makes a difference
 
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