What's in your emergency evacuation kit?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by vegascowgirl, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    Started wondering about this after posting on the "Tasters Choice" thread.
    Over all I guess you could say that my kit is made up of several parts. I keep a tent, one dutch oven, two cast iron skillets, a flint+steel, one blanket,and change of clothes for each person in the family,flashlights,etc in the trunk of my car. (It actually doesn't take up near as much space as it sounds) . In the house I keep a large ice chest filled with canned goods, boil-in-bag rice, macaroni (or noodle of some type) pouch soups, drink mixes,power bars,etc. two 24 packs of bottled water as well. Then under the bathroom sink I keep a back pack full with sample size medicines, toothpaste,soaps,shampoos, and baby wipes (I love those things, you can use them for lots of things). The plan is, if we have to evacuate or something...my husband (if he's not at work) grabs the ice chest and water, I grab the bag and my daughter and we go. Granted even though we live in S.W. MO. and really will probably never have to worry about it, we still keep a kit around. With all the forest around us, a dry year could mean forest fires....and well I just feel better knowing that we have it just in case.

    Do you keep an emergency kit? If so, what's in it? is there anything you would like to include in your kit, but can't?
     
  2. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    Hey Vegas
    I didn't see a water filter anywhere. Water is one thing you'll need and once the gallon jugs and such run out it would be good to have back up in that area. Another thing I keep is some of those snap lights (little plastic light you snap and shake). How about a wind up radio? A small sewing kit. How about a little first aid kit with extra things that are geared toward your family. Does anyone in your family get headaches more then most? Does another maybe have weak ankles so an extra ace bandage would be good for them. You have a pretty good list.

     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Always keep a carrier apiece for the boys. I need to get some dry cat food and litter put in them tho. I also have a crate, but it is a bit heavy for emergencies. When we lived in the back back woods we were always on the watch for fire. Kinda slacked off here in town, but I'm 1/2 block from the train tracks and really need to be prepared in case of some kind of spill or what have you.
     
  4. doodles

    doodles Well-Known Member

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    We have a back pack foreach member of our family.(7) We have things in them that that person would need to live on and wear for at least 3 days.
     
  5. BetwixNBetween

    BetwixNBetween Member

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    I live in NYC - here's my "Getting Out of Dodge" Survival Kit

    Getting out of Dodge - Survival Kit

    EVERYTHING FITS INTO A DAYPACK:

    1 Bandana (face cloth/pot holder)
    1 Short Sleeve/Long Sleeve T-shirts
    1 long sleeve turtleneck
    1 Pair poly/cotton spandex leggings
    1 pair socks
    1 pair long-johns
    Travel size toothbrush/toothpaste/soap/lotion
    Wool gloves
    1 Small notebook (pens/pencil)
    Pocket Size Water Carrier (3 oz.)
    1 pair of "down" slippers (bought online somewhere!)
    Flip-flops

    http://www.campmor.com/webapp/comme...=lCcaC5p+1IIiC4xM4ekRwsv8C/WTCcbdaju2qxQ8oZ8=

    Aqua Blox Emergency Water (REI link see below)
    1 Storm & Survival Kit (REI link below)

    http://www.rei.com/online/store/Search?storeId=8000&seq=21&query=survival+kit

    One "You Can Survive Kit" (http://www.mpioutdoors.com/can.htm)
    (This kit comes with tiny stove/fuel) – the entire kit is the size of Tuna can!!!

    REI Repel 100 (1oz bug spray)
    Duct Tape (small amount)
    AA Mag Lite and AAA Mag Lite (with batteries)
    Very lightweight "Petzle head lamp" (weight about 5 ozs.
    Grundig AA Shortwave/AM/FM Radio (Extra batteries)
    Make-shift personal medical kit
    Space blanket
    Whistle
    Fishing pole/rod&reel
    1 roll Toilet Paper (remove cardboard put in a "brand name" zipper sandwich bag.
    2 Large black garbage bags. They make great SLEEPING BAGS.

    One time camping I spilled water all over my tent floor – I slept in the
    garbage bag – so warm and cozy!

    Also good to carry anytime flying in an airplane (I saw this on a national news report). In case of plane crash climb into the bag – it keeps you warm.

    Quick cook noodles.
    Tuna (in a pouch); Salmon in a pouch
    Brown rice in a pouch
    2 energy bars
    Pre-moistened Body Cleansing Towels (8”x9”)
    Sleeping bags are too cumbersome. I packed a mummy liner:
    Tea bags (throw the bags in a brand-name ziploc baggie).

    Copy and paste the below-listed web address into your browser, if you are interested in the above-mentioned "mummy sleeping bag liner":

    http://www.designsalt.com/cat_searc...arch=fromSearch&btnSearch.x=48&btnSearch.y=10

    Depending upon how much "time" I have to get out of Dodge - I would carry a daypack or a backpack. In the backpack I can stuff an inflatable 2-person raft.

    I "always" have a daypack "ready to go"!

    Guess that's about it. Thanks for your post. I'd better "check" by bags - I like to go through them every few months.

    Safe life all - be aware - be vigilant!








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  6. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    I would like to keep a "all" emergency kit. This also protection from terrorist, etc...
    here is a good list, this reminds me, I need to get started....

    http://www.lacetoleather.com/

    they got a good writeup on emergency prepareness.
     
  7. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    In addition to the normal food, water and survival supplies I pack a few non-standard things.

    I have a couple of encrypted back-up CDs with financial and other personal information. I also have a fireproof container that I can grab quickly that has important documents.

    I live within a few miles of a railroad. There are lots of chemicals that ship by rail and derailments with large releases are not unheard of. I keep a high quality mask and current filters. Not surplus stuff but approved mask and filters. I also have some rain gear that while not perfect will provide some protection if needed. Actual chem resistant suits are pretty reasonable and probably would be a wise investment.

    Soon high level radioactive waste will be shipping by rail to the Yucca Mountain disposal facility. While highly unlikely there might be a radiological incident near me. I keep some current and certified radiological equipment like counters and dosimeters along with Potassium Iodide in case the unthinkable happens. Also this would come in handy in the event of a "dirty bomb" attack (extremely unlikely out in the sticks) or if a nuclear plant were to have a release. While the threat of a general nuclear war is remote the detonation of a small smuggled nuke or some sort of accidental launch is a possibility. Knowing if there is radiation in your area and how much you are being exposed to would be pretty important.

    I'm not the hide in a bunker type but I believe in being prepared. Pretty inexpensive insurance. Plus a geiger counter is pretty interesting tool to experiment with.
     
  8. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

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    I've got a pretty extensive evacuation kit, too, but it's occurred to me that I have no idea where I would "bug out" to. Just wondering where others plan to go.
     
  9. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    I unpacked my kit and have parts always in the car. I have a locked box in the house with important papers and I'd grab that and the dogs and go. Now this is only if there is a fire/contamination or unavoidable forced evacuation. Where would I go? Possibly to my sister's across the county (depends on the reason for the evac) or to friends.

    I mostly decided ages ago, that for anything else, I am not going anywhere. I think thats why I worry less about having the food and stuff packed to go. When I have needed those kinds of items I have been here (slow employment, snowed in, or no water or power).
     
  10. lilrose

    lilrose Member

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    Everyone has some great ideas.......but, ESPECIALLY if you are fleeing a fire or flood, be sure you have packed some priceless family photos in a zip lock bag.....
    they may be the only ones you will ever have. :waa:
     
  11. Jan Sears

    Jan Sears Well-Known Member

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    I would add a wind up flashlight. They are great as no batteries are needed. Also have a wind up radio.
     
  12. Tana Mc

    Tana Mc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live in the absolute middle of no where. I am not going anywhere for any reason other than a tornado --- even then, by the time we figure out we need to be outta here, we probably will be! My bug out bag is my entire cellar......
    I do keep supplies in the vehicles in case the winter weather strands us between home and town. Blanket, water (usually frozen when I need it), small shovel, and cat litter for traction. If we head off the farm, everybody has to have suitable clothing on or in the vehicle. Even if I am going to church in a skirt and heels, I take along my coveralls and boots. It only takes walking in the rain/snow/wind to call for help one time for you to learn your lesson. Cell phone just won't work in this valley.
    Tana Mc
     
  13. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    I live on the top of a ridge...
    no flood danger.
    its all been clear cut, no fire danger.
    the hollow in front of me where the prevailing wind comes from acts as a wind breaker, so tornadoes go around me.
    I do get some nice 100MPH wind sheers every now and then.

    where would I run to? what would I do once I got away?

    nah... I'll hunker down and ride it out... whatever it is.

    besides the nuke plant is only 30 miles away, whatever hits it, splashes over and fries me before I can notice the flash and say "Oh [explitive deleted]".

    if I lived in town or someplace where there was somewhere to run, I would have a bag... here the only escape bag has a .357 with one round in it.
     
  14. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    So umm nobody has a emergency gasmask or a Pistol?

    it is nice to be prepared, but when a major disaster stikes, there will be looting, protect your goods, be kind and pack a .45 or any pistol.
     
  15. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Someone mentioned a water filter -- forget it. From rather extensive experience backpacking with filters, none of them are reliable beyond a few gallons, particularly in hard or polluted water. Pack a bunch of vials of iodine tablets, which weigh vastly less, purify much more water, take much less time to use (just drop a tablet in a quart of water and wait half an hour, rather than squatting by a creek pumping ... pumping ...pumping ... you were going somewhere in a hurry?). Pack gatorade to hide the taste of the iodine, but put it in the water AFTER the obligatory half hour wait period.

    Other things you'll want:

    Detailed local maps (i.e., couple hundred square miles) and a national map in case I'm leaving the entire area. The sort of disaster would dictate which map I grabbed, because that big Rand McNally's is heavy if I'm just booking out of the local area on foot. I also have a mental map of how to get to a family cabin in N. AZ on foot, and avoiding populated areas and following water.

    You'll also want really really good, broken in, comfortable, high-quality, hiking boots, appropriate socks, etc. and clothes appropriate to your area and season. A large, sturdy plastic poncho can also double as a rain shelter if you don't have a tent. (The kind I'm thinking of is the kind you can cover you and your pack with when you're backpacking, and is made out of very tough plastic.)

    Leva
     
  16. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    i dont have one makes things more interesting
     
  17. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    huh? They go around you becasue of a hollow? Not sure how that works.

    What flash? If you are 30 miles away that is close but not so close that you couldn't do something to save yourself in the event of an accident even if you were downwind.

    Nuclear power plants don't explode like most people think. They make a deadly mess in the unlikely event of a total meltdown but they don't explode like a nuclear bomb.

    Speaking of which, for illustration purposes even a 25 megaton thermonuclear bomb airburst 30 miles away from you is entirely survivable with only moderate damage at 30 miles. Overpressure would only be maybe 1 psi at that point. Most nuclear weapons in the Russian inventory run around the 500 kiloton range and less with only a few reaching the 1 megaton mark and the 25 megaton range weapons are very few indeed and relegated for digging out deeply buried targets. A 500 kt weapon going off 30 miles from you might not even wake you up if you were sleeping heavily and you probably wouldn't have any damage to your house. In fact to be injured at all you would probably have to be staring right at it.

    Come on dude..we want ya around with us if something bad ever happens.
     
  18. Tana Mc

    Tana Mc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey thanks Quint. This thread got me to thinking and I feel much better now. Nuclear power plant is about 85 miles from me and I was wondering.....

    So I guess I'll keep those KI tablets handy....and still hunker down right here.
    Tana Mc
     
  19. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Well if you are down wind of it you are gonna need to get the heck outta dodge mostly likely depending on the accident. Those KI pills aren't magic. Just some protection for certain types of damage. If the plant were in full meltdown mode and it was spewing a radiation plume and you were downwind you will need to move. It isn't something you are going to be able to ride out most likely. Interestingly enough a nuclear bomb going off 85 miles from you would be much less dangerous, especially if it is airburst and a newer "cleaner" model, than a nuclear power plant in full meltdown mode and throwing out a plume of radiation. That kind of accident could render a huge swath of land uninhabitable for a very long time.
     
  20. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Hmm