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Ribeye $7.99lb in Ohio? Here in the Springfield, Mo market it is advertised at @ $9.99lb ($9.97 @ Walmart.) Kinda discouraging when you realize that Missouri is number three for cattle numbers in the nation. $10lb is down from $15 plus per lb. that ribeye has been recently.
Yes, in Ohio near Dayton. But not at Kroger or Meijer or other stores. The store selling these has two locations in the area, and they are known for their meat counter. They have various good deals there (last week they had ground beef at $1.99/lb, along with other good deals).

The beef tenderloin shown in the ad - they have the same deal usually 3 or 4 times a year. Nice thing if buying the whole tenderloin is they slice and package it however you want it. I've bought them in the past and it is better than the $18 to $20 a pound tenderloin usually sells for.

Doozie - you never know - you may find out what prime tastes like. :)

But at 18.99/lb for prime NY strip, might as well buy the wagyu. :D
 

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Having been a meat cutter, I buy reduced meat whenever possible. There's nothing wrong with it other than the color has gone from bright red to brownish gray.

This will help explain it:

"Color is used by consumers to determine if meat is fresh and safe to eat. It is the single most important driving factor in a consumer’s decision to purchase meat. Myoglobin is the heme iron containing protein that gives meat its color, and it is a great source of dietary iron. Myoglobin stores oxygen in muscle cells and is similar to hemoglobin that stores oxygen in blood cells.

The more myoglobin content meat contains the darker red it will appear in color. Myoglobin content is higher in beef and lower in poultry with lamb and pork having intermediate amounts. The age of an animal will also impact the myoglobin content of the muscles with older animals having more myoglobin and darker meat. Muscles that are used for movement also have more myoglobin content than muscles used for support. Along with water from muscle, myoglobin is what is found in meat packages that leaks out of the muscles during storage and most people think is blood. Almost all of blood is removed from muscle at the time of slaughter.

Myoglobin has three natural colors depending on its exposure to oxygen and the chemical state of the iron. If no oxygen is present, the meat appears purple red, like in vacuum packaged meat, and is in the deoxymyoglobin state. Meat is bright red when exposed to air and is typical of meat in retail display. Bright red color indicates oxymyoglobin is present. Meat appears tan or brown when only very small amounts of oxygen are present such as when two bright red pieces of meat are stacked on each other excluding the oxygen. Meat can also appear brown when the meats color life is exhausted late in display when the iron in the pigment becomes oxidized. Metmyoglobin is the state when the iron has oxidized and is tan or brown in color."

The color of meat depends on myoglobin: Part 1 - MSU Extension
 

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Good info, some don’t know that.
Me personally, if I have the choice between a steak a X $’s per pound, that was just put out, and the same cut at half price, but just 1 day older, I’m grabbing the half price one.
I buy packaged food all the time out of the “bargain” area. Coffee, cereal, ect, even if past the expiration date.
 

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Sniper,

Yes, grocery stores often run "loss leaders" in their ads to get you into the store. I can understand why a small market would do that in the shadow of Kroger, Meijer, etc.

Packing houses put grind into 10 pound tubes; 70/30, 80/20, ground chuck (also 80/20) and 90/10. The percentages are fat to lean ratio.

A little info on ground meat. It is one of the major sources of E.coli contamination so you have got to watch it.

In most grocery stores they grind their own meat. They conserve all of the trim and fat from cutting retail cuts and blend and grind it together with enough lean meat to achieve the correct ratio. The problem arises from temperature control of the trim. etc. Meat must be kept near the freezing point while grinding to assist in maintaining a barrier against E.coli contamination.

The reason you can eat a rare steak with no problems is because once you sear the outside of the steak all surface bacteria is destroyed by heat, the inside is sterile. Not so with ground beef because all of the ground meat has come in contact with the air and is a contact point. That is why eating a rare hamburger is not recommended.

I cut meat for Sam's Club. It was company policy to throw out all trimmings into the rendering barrel. All of the grind sold came in as pre-grind that we ran through the grinder for a second grind. The grinder was kept in the meat cooler which was maintained at around 32 degrees fahrenheit.

A little on your tenderloins too.

Cheap beef tenderloin is usually cow tenders. Older adult animals that have gone to slaughter. Not two year-olds from the stockyards. Easy way to check is if it is in the original cryovac from the packer, pick it up and look for a select, choice or prime grade inked into the bag. If there is no grade on the package it is likely a cow tender. Cow tenders eat alright. When I worked in a portion-control steak cutting shop we cut many a cow tender and bacon wrapped them for the hospitality industry.
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Never knew that about tenderloin.

A couple years ago I was at a butcher in a town near me. I got my bacon, and asked what they had for making hamburgers as I didn’t see anything in their case. They said they don’t really sell any , but I can order some if I call ahead. The guy pointed out that have premade patties in the freezer though. I bought a box, not cheap either. That were AWFUL! Way too lean and dry. I actually gave the rest of the box to a neighbor.
On the other end of the spectrum, I made the mistake of buying some Aldi’s 70/30 a few years back. When trying to form the patties they would just fall apart and leave a 1/4” thick layer of fat on my hands. Also awful for burgers. I’ve bought 70/30 before and since and had good luck making hamburgers. The meat from Aldi’s would be better off being used a a machining lube!
 

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The whole tenderloins they sell are still in the cryovac. I've also bought whole brisket there that is still in the cryovac as well. If I recall correctly about past purchases(and I'll have to verify next time I buy some meat in the cryovac from there), is that all of the meat has a grade on it. All I know is, whatever the grade it is or isn't, it is tasty and tender. :D

For the ground beef they sell - they sell ground sirloin (either 94/6 or 95/5) (3.99/lb until tomorrow), ground round (90/10), ground chuck (82/18), and then the 75/25 ground beef. Last weeks ground beef that was on sale was for the ground chuck (should have been more specific in my last post). The local store I buy meat from uses good practices, and they sell enough ground meat that they are grinding fresh throughout the day (plus a couple local restaurants buy ground beef from there). Also they keep their meat section quite cold (below 35 from what I've been told by a few of their butchers. In other words, I don't worry about the meat bought there.

Thanks for the reminder about ground meat. However, like anything, I make sure to follow proper food procedures when cooking (the health department and serv-safe training was pounded into my head in the mid 90's). :)

Many years ago (almost 30 years ago)I worked in a meat department. Before that, the cows we raised on my parents small farm, we would butcher ourselves (parents and I, along with aunt and uncles, and cousins). Fond memories. :)
 

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When I buy hamburger I wait until the ground chuck is on sale. Here they put it out in the 10 pound packer tube. The reason I like the chuck is it is from the same muscle mass as the ribeye, therefore you get more of a ribeye flavor in your burger. 20% is not too bad for leaving a lot of grease in the pan and it doesn't flare too much on the grill.

Ground sirloin is kinda misleading as is the petite sirloin steak. It is not top sirloin, it is beef knuckle; a ball of meat that is actually part of the round where it joins the knee cap and is full of connective tissue. They can call it sirloin because it connects to the top sirloin prior to separating the round from the sirloin..

Hamburger as with all beef has to be labeled correctly or the violator can get in dutch with the USDA. It must come from the part of the animal that they claim it is from.

93875
 

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And the best part of the bottom sirloin is the tri-tip. I still don't understand why folks grind it into burger. There are much better ways to prepare it (think Santa Maria steak). I usually will take a tri-tip roast, and sprinkle salt, pepper, and onion powder on it. I'll soak hickory (and sometimes apple or pecan) wood chips in water. Then start some charcoal in the grill. After it is nice and gray, move it all to one side. I'll sear the tri-tip for about 30 seconds to each side, then move it to the opposite side of the grill (away from the charcoal). I'll then put the soaked wood chips on the charcoal, put the grill lid on, and wait about an hour. Usually internal temp is about 150 to 155 Fahrenheit. I'll loosely cover with foil and let it rest for about 10-15 minutes and then do a bias slice (slices less than to slightly more than 1/4 inch). Talk about good eating. BBQ sauce is definitely optional. Now I'm getting hungry. :D


Some pics of some made in the past:



 

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Today is just leftovers from the chicken roast. Im not sure what we will turn it into. I am leaning towards chicken quesadillas.

I'm making pizza dough today for tomorrow's pizza. More burger buns too.

It's been so flipping cold here I want a reminder of summer meal, Wed. we will be back to "normal" cold weather so we are having Brat patties on the grill, potato salad, coleslaw, homemade corn relish, and peach smoothies for dessert.
 

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Doozie,

May I recommend Southern style chicken and dumplings from your leftover bird?

Strip the meat from the bones and dice it into bite sized chunks.

Simmer the bones to get some broth. You can fudge with bouillon and water to stretch.

Make a roux of a stick of butter and enough flour to make a semi-liquid slurry, (not cakey) in a shallow skillet. On low heat gently cook the roux until the flour is not raw, stirring occasionally. Watch for a slight browning. Done

You can make as much roux as you like as it keeps extremely well in or out of the fridge and can be used as a base to make milk gravy for biscuits and sausage gravy. Or to thicken puddings, etc. Butter roux is quite versatile, and tasty on it's own.

Once you have your broth keep it simmering and whisk in the roux until the broth thickens somewhat.

Take a cup of flour.
2 1/2 Tbsp lard
Take a whisk and blend the flour and lard together. Kind of like when you're making buttermilk biscuits.
1/4 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup milk

Double or triple the recipe to match the amount of broth and chicken you have.

Combine in a bowl and take a heavy spoon and blend together.

Flour your cutting board and roll out the dough to 1/4 inch or slightly less in thickness.

Take a butter knife and slice the dough into inch wide strips and then crossways into about two inch or shorter noodles. Don't worry about the raggity ones, they'll cook up and eat just fine.

Put your diced chicken into the broth.

Gently slide the noodles one at a time, (to keep them from sticking together) into the broth, stirring occasionally to keep the noodles from sticking to the bottom of the pot and to keep them separated.

Salt and pepper to taste.

The flour on the noodles from the rolling out procedure will also thicken the broth, so keep that in mind. Depends on if you like your broth soupy or more like a thick gravy.

Any leftovers will thicken up overnight because of post cooking flour absorption.

Enjoy, Or as Julia used to say. "Bon Appétit.... Ya'll"
 

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Today is just leftovers from the chicken roast. Im not sure what we will turn it into. I am leaning towards chicken quesadillas.

I'm making pizza dough today for tomorrow's pizza. More burger buns too.

It's been so flipping cold here I want a reminder of summer meal, Wed. we will be back to "normal" cold weather so we are having Brat patties on the grill, potato salad, coleslaw, homemade corn relish, and peach smoothies for dessert.
doozie - Hmmm, cold weather and leftover chicken.... My first thought was a pot of chicken tortilla soup. I'm sure whatever you decide to make will be tasty. :)
 

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Dumplings are easy to make? Anybody got a recipe?
My wife wants new food ideas and LOVES dumplings. Maybe I’ll surprise her and cook some, if it’s not too tough.
 

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I'm a Bisquick girl myself...

If you make them right they are perfection, light and fluffy.

I have had them disappear into the stew if its boiling too hard or if they didn't have enough of a base to cook upon.
 
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