What's a good homestead water filtration system?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jlxian, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. jlxian

    jlxian Also known as Jean Supporter

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    Any advice on a good homestead water filtration system? One that doesn't cost a small fortune? Could it be a DIY system?
     
  2. jlxian

    jlxian Also known as Jean Supporter

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    Guess I should have included that, sorry.

    We would want to filter out bacteria, primarily, but also the nasty stuff, chemicals and the like.
     

  3. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Just bought the aqua rain filter, so far we arent dead yet! Seems to work pretty good and was a bit cheaper then the berkley -- gives us a max of about 20 gal a day.
     
  4. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    bacteria are killed with uv light or chemical injection . if the well is contaminated then steps should be taken to sanitize the well and prevent recontamination . there are cases where cronic contamination (leechate from a landfill etc.) can cause the well water to be unusable .filtering through a sand filter and then a carbon filtre help. there wass a site where they told you how to make them but can,t find it right now. only site i have you need an engineering degree to understand!some chemicals require a reverse osmosis system,big bucks!
     
  5. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    Have your water tested. You mentioned chemical removal which can be as simple as a charcoal filter or more complex. If you do have bacterial contamination and you can't prevent it from entering your water supply you'll have to use the UV filter previously mentioned preceeded by an effective sediment filter. If you have sulpher, maganese, or iron you're off in a different direction, There's no one size fits all unless you distill all your water.

    Once you know what's in your water, it should be simple to figure out which system or systems you need. You should be able to install most of the common stuff.
     
  6. jlxian

    jlxian Also known as Jean Supporter

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    Thanks for the advice. We are thinking "down the road" for when we will likely be having a water crisis in our area (diminished aquifer, contaminated streams) or in the event of a "homeland security crisis" and may have to rely on our ingenuity for our water supply.

    I had posted earlier about suggestions for water storage for rain water, and this is an offshoot of that line of thought. We'd like to think we would be able to support our family's needs in the event of a major catastrophe/"event" which could shut down existing support systems. Thus my questions -- just a little planning ahead.

    Our present water supply is just fine, other than extremely hard, but we can deal with that. Forgive my doomsday thinking, but if an "event" was to occur, and testing facilities for the water were no longer available, we'd like to be able to filter our water of chemicals and bacteria.