What would you do in my position???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by donsgal, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Last year we had our first-ever garden. It was great. We picked over 300 cucumbers which are now resting comfortably in glass jars in my pantry. In addition we had hords of tomatoes and lots of other wonderful veggies, like carrots, beans, radishes, etc. It was fantastic.

    Soon we will be putting our house on the market so we can MOVE TO THE HOMESTEAD that awaits us in the country. *if* we put in a garden this spring, no doubt, we will sell the house and be forced with a decision of either...1. Tearing the garden OUT in the middle of the summer :( or 2. Not putting a garden in at all :(.

    Either option really sucks in my opinion.

    Unfortunately we can't start a new garden yet in the homestead because we don't have water there yet (you have to water daily in the summer), and because there is nobody living around there and, no doubt, the deer, racoons, and other critters would demolish the garden in short order. So that isn't an option.

    There is a very good chance that the "new owners" really won't want to adopt our garden if we were to leave it, and besides, it is a raised bed garden and cost over $600 to build. The last thing I want to do is leave $600 worth of garden only to have THEM rip it out and throw it over the back fence as soon as they buy the place.

    I told hubby that I thought we should just do some "container" type gardening this year - a few tomatoes, maybe some peppers and such, then we can pack it up when we go. But lordie, I would miss having all that great stuff on our table.

    What would you do in his situation? *sigh*

    donsgal
     
  2. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    We did this when we lived in Vermont. We sold our home after we had put in a garden and thought we'd have to lose everything we'd worked for. Then the realtor told us that it was law that we had to have access to our produce in our garden when it was ripe for harvest. I just had to notify the new owners of my intent to come harvest in advance. We worked it out and it was great. (We moved about an hour away, so I only went up and harvested twice a week)
    Perhaps your laws are similar and you can raise your garden and eat it too!
     

  3. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    Donsgel....

    I sold my place Aug. 1 this year. I had a nice enclosed garden area w/ $6-800 worth of 'improvements'. All I can say is... You don't know WHO will buy your house, but if it's a country property... buyers ALWAYS like the veggie garden/look. If they don't.. they can get rid of it. AND..

    Your place might not sell that fast.. and then you'll have the food. I say just keep on keepin' on.
     
  4. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    I...guess I don't understand something here.
    If you grow in containers, your 600$ worth of built garden will still be there in the backyard, yes? If you plant in it or not, the raised beds will still be there, yes? They will be there for the new owners to rip out regardless of whether you plant in the garden or containers?

    Or are you meaning to rip out the 600$ worth of garden and plant in containers? Is the 600$ garden something you can dismantle and take with you?

    If not, if you are leaving it in place no matter what......plant it. It could very well be a decision maker to someone thinking of buying the house. I sincerely doubt anyone will pass up a house because there is a vegetable garden growing. You will also probably get some early yield vegetables out of it, before it sells. And in the case it DOESNT sell, you have your vegetable garden.

    If you are going to rip up the 600$ garden and bring it with you when you move...plant in containers.
     
  5. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    Grow nothing but early Spring vegetables like peas and fava beans, then move the beds in June, then plant Late Summer and Fall vegetables at the Homestead. Even if you have to rip out some fava bean plants that are still bearing, they are a good cover crop that add lots of nitrogen to your soil.

    Technically though, something like raised beds and soil and plants belong to the new owners unless you specify otherwise. Potted plants would be different. Similarly furniture and appliances are yours, but built in cabinets would be theirs unless you put something else in writing.
     
  6. CJ

    CJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would opt for the container gardening, that way you can still grow a fair amount, and take it with you.

    You'll get more than you realize, Jim and I do that now that we're in the RV. It's rather fun.
     
  7. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Why do you assume that the new owners won't appreciate your garden? It may be the selling feature of the house, you never know, and it certainly adds apparent value. I say plant with easy to grow, low maintenance veggies that won't require a huge effort on their part. That way, if they don't want a garden, you can make arrangements to come harvest later. Or perhaps coax them into maintaining and sharing the harvest?
     
  8. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    i would plant the garden. you'll get some good out of it even if you have to leave it and they won't let you come back to harvest....plant things like tomatoes, squash, cukes, in pots or buckets and take them with you. as soon as you get to the homestead, plant for a fall garden.
     
  9. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Now theres a law that rubs me the wrong way. If you buy property, you should own it including the garden. If you want some of those vegetables, I'll sell them to you. And I'm sure your very nice people too. Funny law though.
     
  10. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When we bought in TX we had to put in the contract that we got the produce or they could've come back to harvest- hopefully only for one year!!!! Not that they minded- they had their next garden going already.
     
  11. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    I think you're saying that you have materials in the garden (wood borders???) that you want to take with you. I would take it out now. Maybe go ahead and leave the soil mounded up and plant some things anyway. But take the hardware out now, before you list the house. I think a buyer might be concerned about how it would look after you tear it out. Planting in some containers is a good idea too.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee Well-Known Member

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    You haven't even put the house up for sale yet? I would go ahead and plant as if you are going to be there a long time. It will be a selling point. Put the price on the house to include the cost of setting up a new one at the new place. Then when they make an offer less than asking price that you are willing to accept, tell them you will accept if you keep the garden. It is likely that you will be closing after harvest, but if not, you are covered either way.
    If they want to keep the garden, raise their offer enough to cover the cost of a new one.
     
  13. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    One cheapie container idea that I saw in MEN one time utilized clothes baskets with garbage bags inside. You could move the soil out of your beds into things like that and then have the 'outsides' empty for moving. I also find five gallon buckets lying by the highway all of the time, no idea why. But I need a bumper sticker: I BRAKE FOR BUCKETS, lol.

    I sold a house to Yuppies one time, who asked me could I please 'remove those planter box things' in the back yard, lolol, in other words, my lovely and productive raised bed garden. So....luckily for me, the guy across the alley was so happy to take my nice duck dirt and compost pile. He spent a couple of days wheeling it back across to his place. He was thrilled, I was thrilled to give it to someone that got it.

    hollym
     
  14. cpeyus

    cpeyus Well-Known Member

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    "planter box things" LOL

    I don't know what the housing market is like in your area, (I had a friend put his house on the market & it was sold the 2nd day...they had to hustle to move out!!) but I wouldn't want to "lose" my garden by leaving it!! I'd probably do a mixture of what everyone else has said...Whenever we've bought/sold property, whatever's there goes with the property...it was hard saying goodbye to our apple, pomegranate, plum, & fig trees!!

    *remove the borders from the beds & plant in the mounds...only spring crops
    *plant in containers that can be moved - using soil from the raised beds that you don't plant with spring crops
     
  15. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Best source for 3 & 5 gallon buckets that I've found is Dairy Queen. They are thrilled to get rid of them. Unlimited supply. They'll even wash 'em out nicely for you!
     
  16. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Plant it.

    And plant at your homestead.

    I put a garden in at the farm last year, and there is no outside water source. I did take 7 gallon jugs up there to get the seedlings in, but that was all the watering I did. Even tomatoes did well!

    Think about it. For years and years, people farmed without a steady water supply, relying only on God's grace for rain, sunshine, etc. If nothing else, you'll have a great head start on next year's garden at the homestead. And your possible buyers will have the garden you planted. Google "dry gardening" and see what comes up.

    I don't know what the laws are by you, but when you sell a house in IL, all vegetation (and the produce from that vegetation) is sold with the house.

    Pony!
     
  17. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    Why does this law rub you the wrong way? The law in Vt. considers it to be food storage, and you are allowed to return and get your harvest for that growing season ONLY. It's not like you can go back year after year or anything. It didn't interfere with our ability to sell our home at all. Most people were delighted to see the garden space there and seeing the produce allowed them to see what was possible in the garden spot. I think the law is a thoughtful one. The only way I'd let the garden go is if I figured it into the asking price.
     
  18. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I suggest you advertise the garden in the effort to sell the place. Gardening is one of the most popular hobbies. It seems one of the reasons many people long for their own piece of property is to have a garden. One of the most common complaints about living in an apartment is not having a garden. A new house comes with dirt. The average new home buyer now spends close to $50K to do the landscape. Your garden is value added to the property.

    Plant it so it looks lucious. Consider the effort an investment. Take photos to put on the piece of paper people get during the open house. Brag about the quality and volume of the produce. It is unlikely anyone interested in the home will not want the boxes, but should you get an offer below your asking price, use it as a bargaining chip. In other words, take the boxes with you if the buyers don't like them or want to pay less. If anyone says "I like the house, not the garden." Say, "No problem, we'll take them with us." Depending on how you've constructed the boxes, it should be a lot easier to disassemble them than it was to build them.

    Plant the homestead as suggested above. Mulch heavily. If it's only an hour away, it won't be that untended.

    Good luck
     
  19. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    One thing that really bothers me if someone should slip and hurt themselves in the garden there could be liability issues.
     
  20. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    You should have SEEN the look on mom's neighbors' faces when I hauled out all of the raised garden beds I'd built her over the years!!!! They grace MY yard now. DEFINITLY take the beds with you. I agree with the idea of pot gardening for now. You might also consider STARTING the new garden (discing and tilling. fence building. soil conditioning). As far as watering goes, think about putting out a couple of water barrels. 55 gallon barrels with the tops cut off. You'd be AMAZED just how much water they collect (even better when put at the corners of barns and stuff when they get built). I live in TX where we went 10 weeks this spring without any rain and with two rain barrels at the corner of a 10X10 porch roof Mom was able to water her gardens for years. grin. Just slip a couple of gold fish in them to take care of insects, and your set. I always meant to make her new barrels with spouts at the bottoms that would connect to a garden hose, but never got around to it and she just filled her watering can from the top. Good Luck!!!