What will keep Pit Bulls on both sides from getting in pasture?????Help!.

Discussion in 'Goats' started by WolfSoul, Sep 26, 2004.

  1. WolfSoul

    WolfSoul Well-Known Member

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    I have another problem with the neighbors beside us and the ones across. Both have male pit bulls. We did not know this when we bought the property. We also did not know that the former owner of this property had his expensive sheep killed (all of them in one day) by the pits. He shot the dogs and it ended up in court.

    I've caught the new pits (they replaced the shot ones) crawling under our fencing and running up our pasture. They've gotten as far as our Miniature Horses before I chased them. Then two days ago I saw footprints around our pond. I asked the neighbors if we had coyotes and they said they'd wondered where their pits had gone that night and why they were so muddy. Apparently they were outside running around our livestock all night. The only thing protecting my minis and goats is 5' no climb fencing and some stock panels to shore up the doors.

    Then the pits across the street have been coming over and nosing my golden retrievers. I'm beginning to feel it's impossible to raise goats here.

    What will keep Pit Bulls away from my goats? Is there an animal I can keep in the pasture that will kick the @#@# out of them? Help!!!!
     
  2. tduerson

    tduerson Well-Known Member

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    Is there laws where you live for letting Pits run lose. Can you contact someone and have something done. I dont take it to lightly when Pits are involved. I have seen in person when they attack and it is not pretty. My dad shot both of our neighbors Pits (She asked him to stop them by shotting them) when they attacked our other neighbors dog in our front yard. Dad shot the first 2 times in the head before it would die and let go and the 2nd one had to be shot 4 times in the head before it died. I LOVE animals and dont beleive in hurting them, but when it comes to Pits I have a little bit different felling about them. I would be very careful around them.
    Tina
     

  3. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    I catch crap on here every time this topic comes around but damn it I refuse to loose stock to stupid pet owners or strays.

    My formula is simple:

    If no stock has been injured I give 1 verbal/written warning (the written warning is the codified law passage for our state specifying a livestock producers right to defend their stock) to the owners then shoot on the second violation.

    If no owner is known I shoot on the second violation.

    If stock has need injured I shoot at first sighting.

    Since we live so far out I hang the carcasses on the barbed wire fence where our road leaves the highway so the owners are sure to see them.

    2 times I have been challenged in court and both times I have won with zero out of pocket expenses (except the drive to the court house). They got slammed with court costs and a fine for admitting their animal was off their property, and on mine, after being properly warned.

    I hate to do it but stock replacement is an expensive and time consuming matter
     
  4. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Look into Livestock Guardian Dogs. There are several breeds. These dogs live with your stock, and will protect them with whatever force is necessary.

    A neighbor of mine has maremmas (sp?) and it's really neat to watch them work. They work in pairs - the dog closest to a perceived threat runs up and confronts it while the second dog gets all the critters away from the threat. Really, really impressive.

    You might think about putting an electric fence around your pastures - with the biggest baddest charger you can find.

    I'm also an advocate of SSS (shoot, shovel, shut up). Any dog repeatedly coming onto my property and harrassing my animals just disappears. (Note, the nice dog who comes over to play with my dogs and doesn't even notice the goats and sheep I have no problems with. It's only the dogs actively trying to get at my critters that get the SSS treatment.)
     
  5. DWFarms

    DWFarms Member

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    Again I would call animal control and tell them that there is pits on the loose and they have been bothering your livestock. They will lead you in the right direction. They should make the man put them up. If he doesn't take a picture of them on you property and give it to the Control officers. This will get them in big trouble because they are going against the law.
     
  6. DWFarms

    DWFarms Member

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    Or borrow someones paint gun and tag the dog so the animal control can see he was within shooting distance. If the paintball gun doesn't deter them enough the Animal Control should.
     
  7. appjuli

    appjuli Member

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    We've lost chickens and cats to the neighbor's Siberian Husky, and a former neighbor had to shoot a Lab because it was running his cattle. Domestic dogs, whatever the breed, are a huge problem for livestock owners.

    I agree with the former poster about sending a written notice (certified mail would be even better!). If you just shoot the dog and don't say anything, the neighbor will get another one. I think you could talk to the neighbor in a non-confrontational way. "Gee, shucks, I'd hate to do it, but you understand... I can't have dogs on my land running my horses..."

    And I second the livestock guardian dog suggestion - I love Great Pyranees!
     
  8. Jenco

    Jenco Well-Known Member

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    I have to disagree with the notion of getting dogs to confront the Pits. If there are more than 1 pit, they will travel/fight in packs and are deadly in most cases. If these dogs have killed livestock before, there will be a HUGE problem. Animal control is the best way deal with the problem. Especially if the dogs have a history in the area.

    I think the paintball gun or electric fence is an excellent idea. This will usually deter most dogs (pits included) and once they associate bad experiences with a specific environment, they will stop. (think of it as a cognitive behavior therapy :D )

    I have worked with pits in the past and they are normally wonderful dogs! Very sweet dispositions and very loving. However they are very, very easy to train and as a result they can become very deadly.
     
  9. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    ~certified letter w/ return receipt to the owners explaining that their animals are loose on your property, demand that the owners secure their dogs and let the neighbors know that they will be liable for any damages their dogs do.

    ~cc. of certified letter to animal control and call animal control to let them know of the situation-ask that an animal control officer come out to meet with you - ask him what the statutes are in your locality

    ~inspect fencing and livestock-document with photos the number/value of your animals and the measures you have taken to protect them

    then decide if you want to take a pro-active or reactive stance on the issue--ie. do you want to try to have the dogs removed before they attack or do you want to wait and see if the dogs attack(the owner may wise-up if you notify him in writing)? only you can answer how you feel about that. just make sure that you document, photograph and cya the entire situation so that you don't end up being labelled the bad guy.
     
  10. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    The paint ball idea is a good one. I used a paint spray can to finally show a neighbor his collie was over here all the time. I do give folks warnings, if they are neighors, my problem is my dog shows no mercy herself, so there isn't alot to give a warning about if they cross her tracts, are too close to her baby goats, or especially her hen house!

    It will be hard for you in the beginning because when you do start with your guradian dogs, they will be pups themselves. I was lucky that when we purchased our property the other places that went up for sale didn't get moved onto for about a year, which gave my dogs (I always keep Rhodesian Ridgebacks and crosses of) a while to grow up. We have our share of pits, rottwilers and other strays that are buried in pet cemetary, mostly by the dogs, some by a 22.

    Check out your laws. Although we don't have a leash law in San Jacinto County, we do have really good animal laws. It only takes one judgement (in our case a drunk neighbor shot a pig of ours) for the neighbors get it really quick they can't afford to replace your stock. I didn't take the judgement from the guy, I did tell him that he was lucky this was just a pig, had it been one of my goats the difference in money would be quite substancial, I just wanted to make a point. It makes it nice when your neighbors are just a tiny bit afraid of you also :)

    Funny how you move out to the country, and coyotes, bobcats and fox, although they are around are not the problem, it's strays and your neighbors pets.

    You do need to buy a few guardains, start them off away from the main fenceline until they are older. I prefer Ridgebacks, because they are not only excellent stock dogs, mine help me clean babies and everything, yet patrol all the property, and stay with me doing chores, greet company, and really seem to know instinctively who belongs and who doesn't.

    I think the 3 S's, originated in Texas :D Vicki
     
  11. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    Hot wire with a good strong charger.
     
  12. WolfSoul

    WolfSoul Well-Known Member

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    It's funny, I moved out to the country thinking there'd be fewer problems with people, only to find a lot of problems with people, just different ones. Geesh.

    These are all good ideas everyone is writing about. I'll try the hotwire AND the dogs. Now......where to get Rhodesian Ridgebacks around my neck of the woods. ........ Off to find some hotwire, load my .22, buy a dog and make a sign up to put on the fence that we subscribe to the SSS law, :haha:

    With all of that, how much time will I be able to devote to my goats???

    Tell me guys, it DOES get easier over time, doesn't it?

    Karen

     
  13. WolfSoul

    WolfSoul Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you've been through it. I've started taking pics with my camcorder to date every time it happens. I think these are all good ideas to CYA. Thanks!
     
  14. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    If you decide to go with an LGD dog, get two & get adults. There is an almost full-grown dog avail. on workingLGDs@yahoogroups.com in TX. If you have good fences, you can get them from rescue groups sometimes too. Here is a good site w/info on the different breeds of flock guardian: http://www.lgd.org/
     
  15. GoldenWood Farm

    GoldenWood Farm Legally blonde! Supporter

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    Use hotwire! And contact your local animal control or something what with all the dog attacks that have been going on where I live I am sure they will do something. It has been horrid latley! please don't get a LGD just yet! Everybody is seeming to forget that a pitbull was bred to fight and fight they will! So unless you want a massacre(sp) don't get a LGD or even 2 just yet. Try hotwire first and again also contact the local animal control or something! The dogs might start with attacking livestock but could quickly and easily find attacking people more "fun".

    MotherClucker
     
  16. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    cattle fence panels, or pig fence panels, and a good gun. that is what will keep them out. send reg. letters to the owners, stating that if their ppits, are caught in your pasture, you are going to shoot them. that is it.
     
  17. dbarjacres

    dbarjacres Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I hate to say it, but other than a loaded gun, there isn't much that'll stop a pit, much less a pack of 'em. Be VERY careful if you buy LGD's or an agressive donkey or something, as they can be prey very easy.

    example...my brother in law works on a large dairy farm and one of the workers has(d) a pair of pits. this pair went into the heifer pasture two weeks ago and pull down and chewed the hell out of a springer (1800 lbs) and she had to be shot. The farm owners shot the dogs and charged the guy $3000 for the heifer. The female pit was shot IN THE HEAD 6 months prior to this by my b-i-l and this dog was still able to have another litter and then kill this heifer.