what wild berries do you eat?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by bluereef, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. bluereef

    bluereef Active Member

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    Apart from the typical backyard berries (raspberries, blackberries, blueberrries), what wild berries do you eat? How do you like to prepare them?

    I'm wondering about hawthorn, yew (NOT the poisonous seeds, just the fruit), rose hips, buckthorn, barberries, etc.

    Wendy
     
  2. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We used to forage for blackthorn (sloes), rosehips, elderberries, wild cherries. Used the rosehips for syrup and everything else went into jams and jellies with wonderful names like "Damn Slow Apple" (damson, sloe, apple) and "Crabby Elder"(crabapple and elderberry).

    We only have elderberries, wild cherries and winged sumac here - I haven't plucked up the courage to try the sumac yet.
     

  3. ozarkin'it

    ozarkin'it Well-Known Member

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    wild hucklberries -- look like tiny blueberries
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I gathered and made my elderberry jelly last weekend. We have wild plums, but I leave them to the birds...to small and wormy to mess with.
     
  5. bluereef

    bluereef Active Member

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    That sounds neat! Care to share your recipes?


    Why is that? I'm unfamiliar with sumac.

    Wendy
     
  6. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didn't really use recipes - cooked up whatever fruit we had collected with a tiny bit of water, then strained it through a jelly bag overnight. Add 1 pound sugar to each 20 oz juice and boil until a set is reached. The crab apples provide the pectin and acid needed to make it set.

    Supposedly you can make a lemonade substitute from any of the red sumac berries, but most of them are furry and that puts me off!
     
  7. CMATE

    CMATE Well-Known Member

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    That's because they are blueberries!! We have both high-bush & low-bush varieties growing all over our property & all of us are constantly eating them as we go along. I have been teaching my 5 yr old grandson on the "how-to's" of picking them, though it always seems like we never make it back to the kitchen with any of the berries!! LOL. Between him & the turkey's & bears, I don't think I'll ever be able to get enough to make a pie!! :haha:
     
  8. mainefun40

    mainefun40 Active Member

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    I see the wild crab apples are falling now, it makes me hungry for crab apple jelly and, of course, elderberry too! Elderberry pie is one of my favorites, a seedy but flavorful treat!
    But, notbody's mentioned chokecherries!! I guess they're good for wine, but what a tart surprise eaten from the bush! And, not really a berry, I love wild grapes and also persimmons!

    I miss getting persimmons here in Maine!

    A note---so many of the crab and wild apple trees are being cut down for "development" a good crab apple is hard to find, and enough wild apples for cider ain't easy either!
    We're trimming our trees trying to save and keep them!

    Steve
     
  9. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ah, I forgot about our persimmon trees! We have two that I've found so far...one lovely one in the front yard by the pond and one huge one on the edge of the woods. I always nibble a few in the Fall...may try making some persimmon jam this year, but usually I just leave them for the coons and possums.

    I have a tree that I can't figure out. It blooms early in the Spring - white blooms like those ornamental pear trees - has shiny green leaves that make me think it's a pear. The fruit right now looks like clusters of tiny green apples and when I cut one in half with a fingernail it smelled like a green apple. But the skin looks like an unripe pear. The fruit never gets bigger than a large pea and it turns slightly brown.

    Anyone know what that is?
     
  10. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    My mom does the whole round of berries- wild strawberries, juneberries, pincherries, chokecherries, highbush & lowbush cranberries, blueberries, wild raspberries, wild wild blackberries, hazelnuts.
    Chokecherries make a good jelly too- tastes like cranberry. Blueberries are no good here this year but the chokecherries are great.
    Sumac lemonade is made of 1 qt boiling water, 1 "horn" of sumac and sugar to taste. It is good and the "hairs" melt or go away in some fashion.
    Another good one is juneberry, aka serviceberry or shadberry. Sweet, and kind of a cherry/blueberry taste. You can buy these from some nurseries or USDA too.